Skip to main content

Newsroom

NEH in the News

Selected articles on NEH-supported projects.
Posted: April 3, 2017 Project Would Give Native Americans Voice in Films about Them
Arizona Public Media

The National Endowment for the Humanities has awarded $291,00 to a project at the University of Arizona to record new narrations for mid-century educational films about the native tribes of the Southwest.

The films were made soon after World War II and shown widely in social studies classes in what was then called Junior High School, said UA professor Jennifer Jenkins.

"And it was a way for our still largely rural population to learn about other parts of the world," she said.

Many of these films featured the Native American tribes in and around Arizona. However, the tribes themselves were never involved in the filmmaking process, said Jenkins.

"Quite often they would go into villages, set up the cameras, shoot, never talk to the people who actually live there."

Jenkins’ project aims to rectify that.  "We’re going to return the films to the communities and have them tell the stories of what they see on screen."

Posted: March 31, 2017 STEM and the humanities are equally important, and should be taught together
The Diamondback (UMD)

With the global push toward STEM, more and more academic institutions are pushing for an education that divides sciences from the arts, humanities and social sciences. Just a few weeks ago, President Trump's federal budget plan proposed cutting the National Endowment for the Arts and the National Endowment for the Humanities — which no American president has proposed before. It is dire moments like these when we must realize more than ever the importance of the humanities and the sciences, that we need a vast education to create tangible change in our country. The two cannot be separated and it's more important than ever that they coexist.

Posted: March 31, 2017 Governors State University Receives Prestigious National Humanities Grant
Enews Park Forest, IL

The College of Arts and Sciences (CAS), in conjunction with the Veterans Resource Center at Governors State University, has been named one of ten Illinois organizations to receive $100,000 in National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) funding for a project that broadly explores the ways in which members of the military, and their families, experience trauma. The Dialogues on the Experience of War project was designed by GSU Professor Rosemary Johnsen and CAS Interim Dean Andrae Marak, experts on WWI literature and the oral histories of war veterans. In total, 208 humanities projects were funded nationally, in the amount of $21.7 million.

Posted: March 31, 2017 Community Invited to Free Workshop on Preserving Family Heirlooms
Southeast Missouri News

Kent Library is offering the workshop thanks to a $5,910 Preservation Assistance Grant for Smaller Institutions awarded in December to Kent Library’s Special Collections and Archives by the National Endowment for the Humanities. In addition to the workshop, the funding is being used to conduct a holistic preservation assessment of Special Collections and Archives beginning in April. The grant makes it possible for Kent Library to hire a preservation consultant to assess environmental conditions, storage policies, and provide strategies to optimize preservation, including development and implementation of a disaster preparedness and recovery plan. The consultant’s assessment will include a long-range preservation plan, but may also include some short-term steps to be implemented right away. The library hopes to begin implementing short-term recommendations and work on fundraising possibilities to implement long-term preventative conservation strategies by November.

Posted: March 31, 2017 Don't cut our progress
The Michigan Daily

The national effect of placing such little value on the arts, humanities and research and so much on defense depicts the United States as a defensive and shortsighted nation. The NEA and NEH, which each received around $148 million last year out of a $4 trillion budget, have brought about lasting celebration and appreciation of the arts. Eliminating these agencies is a shameless ignorance of the invaluable output that has been generated from a merely fractional input. The NIH has been — and continues to be — a chief funder of research and the sciences. Slashing its funding by 20 percent is a surefire way to usher in a “lost generation” of scientific innovation and careers. Investments in these three programs have led to or supported thousands of jobs.

Posted: March 31, 2017 People won't read if federal arts programs are defunded
The Washington Examiner

New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof said federal humanities programs may seem "irrelevant," but they play a role in spreading freedom.

"The world has been transformed over the last 250 years by what might be called a revolution of empathy driven by the humanities," Kristof wrote. "Previously, almost everyone (except Quakers) accepted slavery and even genocide. Thomas Jefferson justified the 'extermination' of Native Americans; whippings continued in American prisons in the 20th century; and at least 15,000 people turned up to watch the last public hanging in the United States, in 1936. What tamed us was, in part, books."

He went on to cite Harriet Beecher Stowe's Uncle Tom's Cabin (1852) and Anna Sewell's Black Beauty (1877) as examples of literature that made Americans more empathetic, though both books were published nearly 100 years before the National Endowment of the Arts and National Endowment for the Humanities were established.

Posted: March 31, 2017 The National Endowment for the Humanities Funds the ANS’s Hellenistic Royal Coinages Project
Pocket Change is a blog of the American Numismatic Society

We are thrilled to announce that the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) has awarded the American Numismatic Society (ANS) a substantial grant of $262,000 to fund the web-based Hellenistic Royal Coinages (HRC) project. Under the direction of Curator Dr. Peter van Alfen and Director of Data Science Ethan Gruber, this three-year project (Phase 1, planned for 2017–­2020) promises to radically transform the ability of students, scholars, or collectors to identify and research Hellenistic royal coinages, and to incorporate this numismatic material into broad analyses of political, economic, and social history. The funds from this grant will be used solely to hire assistants to aid in the extensive photography, cataloguing, and typology work that lies at the heart of the project.

Posted: March 31, 2017 Curating Kisumu
Sponsored by a grant from the Office of Digital Humanities at the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH), Curating Kisumu: Adapting Mobile Humanities Interpretation in East Africa, launches in 2014-15. A partnership between Cleveland State University and Maseno University in Kisumu, Kenya, the project will explore challenges associated with extending the Curatescape mobile app concept to East Africa beginning with western Kenya.

Sponsored by a grant from the Office of Digital Humanities at the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH), Curating Kisumu: Adapting Mobile Humanities Interpretation in East Africa, launches in 2014-15. A partnership between Cleveland State University and Maseno University in Kisumu, Kenya, the project will explore challenges associated with extending the Curatescape mobile app concept to East Africa beginning with western Kenya.

Posted: March 31, 2017 Budget cuts may impact humanities
Dodge City Daily Globe

The work of the Kansas Humanities Council, as of all state councils, is funded primarily by the National Endowment for the Humanities. This has been the case since President Lyndon Johnson signed federal legislation in 1965. Since then, the NEH has benefited from bipartisan support, every Congress since having believed in the power of the humanities to make a difference in the lives of Americans.

Now, however, the current proposed federal budget would eliminate all funding for the NEH, putting at risk our own KHC, putting at risk humanities events in our communities. Yet the federal investment in the NEH costs less than the price of a stamp per each American per year. Less than one-tenth of one percent of annual federal spending goes to the NEH.Will you join your fellow Kansans, and fellow Americans, in speaking up to support funding for the Humanities? Contact Representative Roger Marshall and Senators Pat Roberts and Jerry Moran. Remind them that funding for the National Endowment for the Humanities enables our Kansas Humanities Council to award grants and support programs that engage Kansans with the history and ideas that make our community a better place to live.

Cutting the NEH would negatively affect our community's quality of life.

Posted: March 31, 2017 $100,000 NEH Grant to Fund Veterans Dialogue Project at St. John Fisher College
St. John Fisher College

The College is just one of 15 recipients of the NEH’s special Dialogues on the Experience of War grant program, which supports the study and discussion of important humanities sources about war and military service.

Set to launch in spring 2018, it will be managed by Dr. Carolyn Vacca, associate professor and chair of the History Department, and will include Dr. Frederick Dotolo, associate professor of history.

“Through the study of humanities sources about war and public discussions, we hope to enhance our understanding of the historical resonance of war experiences and the pressing moral and ethical issues associated with war,” said Vacca.