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Office of Communications and Public Affairs

The Office of Communications and Public Affairs represents the National Endowment for the Humanities in communications with the media and members of the public. Its mission is to disseminate information about NEH grant programs and products and to promote the importance of the humanities our country’s cultural advancement and in enriching the lives of its citizens.

The Office of Communications and Public Affairs publishes news releases and other information, works with the news media to keep them informed of the work of the agency and its grantees, manages the agency’s website and social media, and publishes announcements of NEH grants. The office also responds to media requests, arranges interviews with NEH staff, and coordinates major NEH public events, including the National Humanities Medals and the annual Jefferson Lecture in the Humanities.

To reach NEH’s Office of Communications and Public Affairs, please contact:

telephone: 202-606-8446
email: communications@neh.gov

To find the Grantee Communication Toolkit click here

Recent News

Presidents and the Press: A Pulitzer Centennial Event

NEH Chairman attends Presidents and the Press: A Pulitzer Centennial Event

20 NEH-Funded Films To Watch This Summer

NEH has opened new worlds of learning with noteworthy films

Expanding Our Current Scope | NDNP

NEH & LOC announce the expansion of the chronological scope of the National Digital Newspaper Program

William Craig Rice, Farewell

NEH remembers Director of Division of Education Programs
February 3, 2017

American Dreamer: The Life and Times of Henry Wallace

In this one-act play based on the award-winning book of the same name by Senator John C. Culver and John Hyde, actor Tom Milligan portrays Henry A. Wallace, the agricultural innovator and founder of Pioneer Hi-Bred seed corn company who became US Secretary of Agriculture and later Vice President under Franklin Roosevelt.

February 3, 2017

Crazy Politics: Populism, Conspiracy Theories, and Paranoia in America

With political science professor Cornell Clayton, explore how American politics has become an arena for suspicious and angry minds. Rather than debunking today’s conspiratorial claims, Clayton argues that both populism and a paranoid thinking have always played important roles in American politics. From the fear of the Illuminati, to the Know-Nothing movement in the 1850s, to Father Charles Coughlin, Huey Long, and the John Birchers, there always have been leaders and groups who see politics in apocalyptic terms and believe powerful elites are conspiring against ordinary Americans. Clayton’s talk explains the rise of today’s populist and conspiratorial politics, draws parallels to earlier periods, and describes how populism on the left and right today differ.

January 31, 2017

The Long Haul: Stories of Human Migration

Examine the roots and the routes of human migration from our beginnings in Africa and trace our oft-branching journey into the 21st century. What happens when vast numbers of our fellow humans are on the move? Led by scholar David Fenner, this talk explores the push and pull factors that cause human migration, which in turn can help us understand more fully events in the headlines and better know the mosaic of peoples who have settled in the Pacific Northwest.

January 29, 2017

Poetry & Discussion with Eric McHenry, Poet Laureate of Kansas

The Poet Laureate of Kansas promotes the humanities as a public resource for all Kansans with readings and discussions about poetry in communities across the state.

Eric McHenry of Lawrence is the 2015-2017 Poet Laureate of Kansas. A nationally known poet and associate professor of English at Washburn University in Topeka, his work has been featured in publications such as Poetry International, Slate, Yale Review, and Topeka Magazine, among many others.

January 28, 2017

Beyond Human: Science, Technology, and the Future of Human Nature

Throughout history, religious scholars and philosophers have debated what makes humans unique in the animal kingdom. More recently, evolutionary biologists and cognitive scientists have contributed new thinking to our ideas about human nature. Has the essence of what it is to be human shifted over time? How might science and technology—such as recent rapid advances in bioengineering and other fields—challenge and reshape our understanding of what it means to be human?

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