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Office of Communications 

The Office of Communications represents the National Endowment for the Humanities in communications with the media and members of the public. Its mission is to disseminate information about NEH grant programs and products and to promote the importance of the humanities our country’s cultural advancement and in enriching the lives of its citizens.

The Office of Communications publishes news releases and other information, works with the news media to keep them informed of the work of the agency and its grantees, manages the agency’s website and social media, and publishes announcements of NEH grants. The office also responds to media requests, arranges interviews with NEH staff, and coordinates major NEH public events, including the National Humanities Medals and the annual Jefferson Lecture in the Humanities.

To reach NEH’s Office of Communications, please contact:

telephone: 202-606-8446
email: communications@neh.gov

To find the Grantee Communication Toolkit click here

Recent News

Costica Bradatan

Q&A with NEH Public Scholar Costica Bradatan

NEH Public Scholar Costica Bradatan discusses his book In Praise of Failure

Presidents and the Press: A Pulitzer Centennial Event

NEH Chairman attends Presidents and the Press: A Pulitzer Centennial Event

20 NEH-Funded Films To Watch This Summer

NEH has opened new worlds of learning with noteworthy films

Expanding Our Current Scope | NDNP

NEH & LOC announce the expansion of the chronological scope of the National Digital Newspaper Program
April 20, 2017  to  June 3, 2017

Black Art—Ancestral Legacy: The African Impulse in African American Art

This exhibition addresses the question posed by African American poet Countee Cullen in 1926: “What is Africa to me?”  This exhibition provides a number of examples from twentieth-century African American artists—both trained and untrained—that visually respond to this question. These modern artists draw heavily on African influence, while simultaneously reinterpreting it for a different time and place

April 13, 2017

Bandanas to Badges: Songs and Stories of Northwest Workers

Real people and real experiences are the foundation of folk music and stories, and are codified in the lasting representations found in our oral histories. Acoustic trio Trillium-239 shares stories and songs of working life in the Northwest, beginning with American settlement of the West and ending with modern high-tech industries.

April 8, 2017

Coming Home: How the Humanities Helps Soldiers Find Meaning After War

This talk shares stories of the men and women who signed up to serve during the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, and incorporates experiences and insights from famous writers and philosophers about war and its aftermath. Drawing from hundreds of hours spent with veterans, author and professor Jeb Wyman discusses the profound moral and emotional impact the experience of war has had on them, and how war forever changes those who return from it.

April 6, 2017

The Long Haul: Stories of Human Migration

For more than 200,000 years, Homo sapiens have been moving around the planet, sometimes drawn and sometimes driven by a host of natural and man-made forces: drought, floods, crop failure, war, the quest for survival, or the hope of a better future.  Examine the roots and the routes of human migration from our beginnings in Africa and trace our oft-branching journey into the 21st century.

April 6, 2017

"Growing and Aging" Library Series

The schedule of readings for the Spring 2017 NYH R & D Program follows: March 16–Introductory/ Orientation Session: selected readings from A History Of Old Age, Ed. Pat Thane; March 23–Tinkers by Paul Harding; March 30–Selected Readings from A History Of Old Age, Ed. Pat Thane, with individual participants’ presentations on selected readings; April 6–Selected Readings from Literature And Aging: An Anthology, Eds. Martin Kohn, et al., with individual participants’ presentations on selected readings; April 13th.  Selected Readings from Literature And Aging: An Anthology, Eds. Martin Kohn, et al., with individual participants’ presentations on selected readings; and April 20–Selected Readings from In Our Prime: The Invention of Middle Age by Patricia Cohen, with individual participants’ presentations on selected readings, and concluding remarks. Program readings are available at the Roxbury Library or through the Four County Library System.

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