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HollandSentinel.com / 7/26

July 26, 2018

A look back at the history of Saugatuck’s weekly newspaper, The Commercial Record, on its 150th anniversary will be the topic of the Saugatuck-Douglas History Center’s next “Tuesday Talk” on July 31, in the Old School House, 130 Center Street, Douglas.

Sharing the role of presenters, former owner/editor of the newspaper Art Lane and current editor Scott Sullivan will reminisce about the evolution of Allegan County’s “oldest newspaper in continuous publication” (not counting two weeks off in 1886), through five different names and 20 different owners.  Together, they also give interesting witness to how the newspaper business has changed dramatically on their watch.

Among SDHC’s archives is a digitized library of The Commercial Record issues dating back to 1868. Soon, thanks to a 2018 Michigan Digital Newspaper Grant offered by the Clarke Historical Library at Central Michigan University, about 9,000 pages from the newspaper’s 1959-69 issues being digitized in high-resolution at the Clarke facility will be accessible online. Each page will be indexed and word-searchable, allowing for efficient searches over the internet from anywhere in the world as part of the Clarke Library’s Michigan Digital Newspaper database.

The CMU/Clarke grant, sought jointly by SDHC and Saugatuck-Douglas District Library, was funded with a 2012 grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities’ National Digital Newspaper Program to digitize culturally significant Michigan newspapers.

Latest NEH in the News

Posted: August 15, 2018 Library of Living Philosophers receives grant for new publication
Southern Illinois University News

On the cusp of its 36th publication, the Southern Illinois University Carbondale Library of Living Philosophers, housed in the philosophy department, will receive funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities in support of a new and unique collaborative research project.

The $39,300 awarded to Sara Beardsworth, Library of Living Philosophers series editor and project director for the collaborative research grant, will support the upcoming publication of “The Philosophy of Julia Kristeva,” which is scheduled for release in 2021.

With the goal of supporting vital research, education and the preservation of educational resources in the humanities, the NEH is an independent federal agency created in 1965. It is one of the largest funders of humanities programs in the United States.

The Endowment accomplishes its mission by awarding grants for the top-rated proposals examined by panels of independent, external reviewers. The organization has only awarded seven grants nationally in the category of collaborative research in 2018.

Posted: August 15, 2018 Grant moves forward WQED's 'The Shanghailanders' documentary
Tribune-Review

A National Endowment for the Humanities grant is helping to move forward the development phase of a 90-minute documentary WQED plans to produce focusing on the social, cultural, and political legacies of European Jews who found refuge in Shanghai, China, during the late 1930s.

The grant award is in the category of media projects, according to a news release, to support film, television, and radio projects that explore significant events, figures, and ideas within the humanities.

“This grant is an important endorsement of our efforts to share this significant point in history with the national PBS system. The financial award is the first step that leads to further funding opportunities to go into actual production,” Darryl Ford Williams, WQED vice president of content, says in the release.

With a working title of “The Shanghailanders,” the documentary will cover the intersection of cultures and conflict. Shanghai had for centuries a complex association with Jewish immigrants, and was the pivotal point for tens of thousands of Jews desperate to flee Nazi persecution during World War II when the rest of the world had turned its back on them, the release adds.

Posted: August 15, 2018 NC school gets grant for African-American Heritage Center
WRAL.com

A historically black university in North Carolina has received a $350,000 grant to turn a 1920s-era school for African-American children into a center to tell the stories of those students and others educated at similar schools.

Elizabeth City State University officials say in a news release that National Endowment for the Humanities gave the grant to pay for the renovation of the Rosenwald School building and the Principal's House on the campus.

ECSU officials said last week that they must match the grant with donations to go toward the $1.5 million cost of turning the buildings into the Northeastern North Carolina African-American Research and Cultural Heritage Center.

Rosenwald Schools were named for Julius Rosenwald, a Sears and Roebuck executive who paid for schools for rural black children across the Southeast.

Posted: August 15, 2018 More old SD newspapers to be digitized
The Capital Journal

Even more old South Dakota newspapers will be viewable and machine searchable from living rooms across the world.

Dozens of archives from papers across the state already have been digitized. The continuation of the project is made possible by a third round of funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

In a news release last week, the South Dakota State Historical Society announced it had received another NEH grant – this one for $280,200 – to digitize old newspapers that were published in the state.

The newspapers will be digitized from microfilm already housed at the state archives. The images and the digital text – which will allow people to search across the entire set of newspapers – will become a part of a U.S. Library of Congress initiative called Chronicling America.

Posted: August 14, 2018 National Endowment for the Humanities awards $43.1 million in grants
Art News Daily

National Endowment for the Humanities awards $43.1 million in grants | The National Endowment for the Humanities has announced its final round of funding for the 2018 fiscal year. More than 200 projects across the US will be awarded a total of $43.1 million in grants. The recipients include visual art projects, academic publications, research centres and cultural hubs. Almost a third of the total amount will constitute the NEH’s new Infrastructure and Capacity-Building Challenge Grants, which support physical and digital arts infrastructure.