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Posted: August 18, 2017 SMCM Prof. of Anthropology Julia King Awarded $240,000 Grant for Native American Study
Southern Maryland Online

St. Mary's College of Maryland Professor of Anthropology Julia King, in collaboration with the Virginia Department of Historic Resources (DHR), Chesapeake Conservancy, and the state-recognized Rappahannock Tribe of Virginia, have been awarded a $240,000 grant by the National Endowment for the Humanities to trace the history and development of the Rappahannock Indians in early American history (200-1850 AD). The grant was one of 245 humanities projects from across the country awarded a combined $39.3 million from the NEH. Competition for these grants is rigorous, with a 14 percent success rate.

"Thanks to the NEH grant, we will be able to start addressing some of the recommendations from the original study we conducted in 2016," King said. "We hope to assemble a detailed culture history for the Rappahannock Indians in the river valley over the last 2000 years, including archaeological collections-based analysis and a regional survey."
 

Posted: August 18, 2017 To understand the US's complex history with slavery, look to Thomas Jefferson
The Guardian

Last year Monticello, with the National Endowment for the Humanities and University of Virginia (founded by Jefferson), hosted a public summit on the legacies of race and slavery. It has also launched an app, “Slavery at Monticello”, and is restoring Mulberry Row, the principal plantation street that was the center of life for free white and black people, indentured servants and slaves. Work is under way to preserve or reconstruct its dwellings, workshops and storehouses.

Posted: August 18, 2017 An American Dialect Dictionary Is Dying Out. Here Are Some Of Its Best Words.
Huff Post

There are few resources other than DARE and projects like Vaux’s Cambridge Online Survey of World Englishes that are taking the time to not only track new regionalisms across the U.S., but safeguard the local words and phrases whose usage is dwindling ― from Gullah words on the southern coasts to Mormon and Amish sayings in the heartland to Spanish-infused speech in the American Southwest. Due to lack of funding, Hall says that DARE will be winding down its services by the end of the year. Any future funding ― be it from federal agencies like the National Endowment for the Humanities or private foundations like the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation ― will be used to continue to update the digital version of DARE, but the organization will cease plans to continue its fieldwork and in-person research. 

Posted: August 17, 2017 Award-winning Author Kwame Alexander will headline local black book festival
Moultrie News, SC

Alexander believes that poetry can change the world, and he uses it to inspire and empower young people through his Writing Workshop. A regular speaker at schools and conferences in the U.S., he also travels the world—including Singapore, Brazil, Italy, France, Shanghai, and recently, Ghana—planting seeds of literary love.

“We are thrilled that Kwame, one of the most inspiring authors in America today, will join us for our second festival,” announced Brittany Mathis, director of the Charleston Friends of the Library, one of the sponsors of the festival. Other sponsors include the South Carolina Humanities, the YWCA of Greater Charleston, the YMCA of Greater Charleston, the Avery Research Center, CharlestonGood, and the Lagunitas Brewing Company .

South Carolina Humanities receives funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities as well as corporate, foundation and individual donors

Posted: August 17, 2017 A creative collaboration results in a $150,000 grant to chronicle Brattleboro's publishing and literary history
The Commons, Vermont

Earlier this month, The National Endowment for the Humanities chose Brattleboro as the site for a new $150,000 multi-year “Creating Humanities Communities” matching grant to illuminate and share greater Brattleboro area’s rich history of words — stories, literature, publishing, printing — with a goal of cultivating a greater sense of place for those who live, work, play, and raise families here, as well as to attract and inform visitors.