Upcoming and Ongoing Events

June 2017

June 6, 2017

Homestead Dreams

In 1862, Congress passed and President Abraham Lincoln signed one of America’s most important pieces of legislation: The Homestead Act. This far-reaching law impacted Montana then, and does to this very day. Montana has always been a state marked by boom and bust—the fur trade, cattle on the open range, the gold and silver, coal and oil rushes. But no moment in our history has left a mark like that of the “honyocker” or homesteader.

June 3, 2017

Conversation Project: What Are You?

Mixed-Race and Interracial Families in Oregon's Past and Future. The number of mixed-race people and interracial families in Oregon is growing. What are the challenges and benefits of growing up mixed-race, raising mixed-race children, or being an interracial couple in a state that’s historically been mostly white? How can we openly discuss our own ethnic and racial heritage with each other without being regarded as odd or unusual? How have the answers to “What are you?” changed through the decades?

Dmae Roberts, who has written essays and produced film and radio documentaries about being a biracial Asian American in Oregon, leads a discussion of heritage that goes beyond checking one race on US Census forms.

June 3, 2017

Conversation Project: What Are You?

Mixed-Race and Interracial Families in Oregon's Past and Future. The number of mixed-race people and interracial families in Oregon is growing. What are the challenges and benefits of growing up mixed-race, raising mixed-race children, or being an interracial couple in a state that’s historically been mostly white? How can we openly discuss our own ethnic and racial heritage with each other without being regarded as odd or unusual? How have the answers to “What are you?” changed through the decades?

Dmae Roberts, who has written essays and produced film and radio documentaries about being a biracial Asian American in Oregon, leads a discussion of heritage that goes beyond checking one race on US Census forms.

May 2017

May 31, 2017

Somerville's Oldest Commercial District: Union Square

The Somerville Council on Aging will host a slideshow and discussion about the economic history of Somerville's oldest commercial district, Union Square. The discussion will profile some of the Square's biggest employers beginning in the 1800s, including the meat-packing, glass-blowing, and textile finishing industries. The event will also feature a selection of photographs and histories of businesses spanning the last 100 years

May 30, 2017 to June 27, 2017

Crossroads of Empire: Early Printed Maps of the American Southwest

Based on an exhibition organized by the Amon Carter Museum and The University of Texas at Arlington Library, this Humanities Texas traveling exhibition spans the mapmaking enterprise, beginning with the earliest known map to show the Texas edge of the Gulf (1512) and ending with an 1873 map of Texas showing the right of way granted to railroads.

May 30, 2017

Supporting Pollinators

Join the High Desert Museum for the second event in their series about the role of pollinators in our communities. Pollinators are vulnerable to pests, diseases, and environmental change. This discussion will explore what is being done to help native pollinators and what else we can do to support these vital species. Hear from a range of experts including Dirk Renner of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Katya Spiecker, founder of Monarch Advocates of Central Oregon.

May 26, 2017

Nebraska Spirit: The North Platte Canteen

During World War II, American soldiers from across the country rolled through North Platte, Nebraska, on troop trains en route to Europe and the Pacific.  Learn the story of the community that turned a railroad depot into a legend and touched the lives of more than six million soldiers from 1942 to 1946.  Charlotte salutes our humble Veterans who served in the military.  This program is excellent for Memorial Day, July 4th, and Veterans Day.

May 26, 2017

Nebraska Spirit: The North Platte Canteen

During World War II, American soldiers from across the country rolled through North Platte, Nebraska, on troop trains en route to Europe and the Pacific.  Learn the story of the community that turned a railroad depot into a legend and touched the lives of more than six million soldiers from 1942 to 1946.  Charlotte salutes our humble Veterans who served in the military.  This program is excellent for Memorial Day, July 4th, and Veterans Day.

May 25, 2017

INconversation with Adrian Matejka

Adrian Matejka wasn’t the first Hoosier kid to dream about outer space. Growing up in Indianapolis in the 1980s, a time of space shuttles and the Strategic Defense Initiative, Star Trek and Sun Ra, the stars both guided and obscured the earthly complexities of race, poverty, masculinity and migration. We’re proud to host the Circle City launch of Pulitzer Prize finalist Adrian’s newest volume of poetry, in partnership with Indy Reads Books. Join us to hear Adrian read from Map to the Stars, talk about his inspirations and answer questions from the audience.

May 24, 2017

Immigration and Somerville's Economy: A Historical Perspective

A panel discussion on the historical role of immigration in the city's economic development. How did immigrants from Ireland, Italy, Greece, and other countries shape early Somerville? More recently, immigrants have come to the city from all over the world including Brazil, Haiti, and Cape Verde. What are the participants' hopes for the future of immigration and economic life of the city? How is the role of immigration in Somerville's history significant?

May 21, 2017

Celebrate 15 Years of Reading Across Rhode Island

Come celebrate all that we’ve accomplished together to promote literacy and community connections across our state!

May 20, 2017

Bdote Field Trip - Dakota in the Twin Cities

Spend the day visiting local sites of significance to Dakota people and learning about them from Dakota perspectives. As you experience these places, you will challenge assumptions made about Dakota history and identity and gain a deeper understanding of the significance of places like Pilot Knob, Wakan Tipi, and Mounds Park to this land’s first people.

May 19, 2017

Patchwork of the Prairie

Hollenbeck presents a trunk show of approximately 30 quilts made by members of the same family spanning 135 years. The stories behind both the quilters and the quilts themselves are shared and accompanied with some of Hollenbeck’s own cowboy/cowgirl poetry.

May 18, 2017

Genealogy Roundtable

Library patrons interested in researching their own family histories get together to discuss problems in their research and share tips on sources and methodology. Both beginners and longtime researchers welcome.

May 18, 2017

Hervey Bowden Essay Contest

High School students explore local and regional history topics.

May 16, 2017

History of Anatomy & Human Dissection

Jan Kletter, MD, WVU Assistant Professor of Surgery, will lecture on the History of Anatomy & Human Dissection as part of the Pylon Medical History Lecture Series. Sculpted by the late Milton Horn, the pylons of WVU Health Sciences Center are an iconic representation of art, history, and education in the form of seven foot marble pillars.

May 15, 2017

A Musical Journey Across America: Songs that Helped Shape a Nation

From the engaging sea shanties of the Eastern Seaboard to the haunting songs of the Appalachian Mountains, from the blues of Mississippi to the pioneer songs of the American West, Chris Sayre brings to life the rich and varied music of the continental United States.

May 13, 2017

Nebraska Warrior Writers Workshops

Professional instruction, support, and skill development for veterans and active duty military, regardless of experience or writing style.

May 11, 2017

Combating Islamophobia

At this moment in our nation’s history, there is an unprecedented need for interreligious education and engagement around Islam.


 

May 10, 2017

“Agriculture on Display: 1900-1950”

Kent County is paying tribute to workers who have made their county what it is today. Inspired by the Smithsonian traveling exhibition, The Way We Worked, almost 30 events and exhibits are being offered in celebration.  


 

May 8, 2017

From the Ground Up: Exhibition of works by artist Gil Martin

The Capital City Arts Initiative [CCAI] presents its exhibition, From the Ground Up, by artist Gil Martin at the CCAI Courthouse Gallery. Martin's  latest body of work has unmistakable references to Western landscapes. He neither foster those images, nor eschew them. They mainly come about by working horizontal bands of color against one another until the painting unifies. His goal is to create a provocative visual experience, first for himself, then, hopefully, for other viewers.

May 7, 2017

At the Crossroads of Many Cultures

A George R. Mather Sunday Lecture Series.

May 7, 2017

Poetry of Women of the Land

Women pioneers and homesteaders played an important part in the development and heritage of Nebraska. In this program, Marge Saiser and Lucy Adkins will honor them, sharing poetry they have written from the point of view of Nebraska women living from the 1890’s to the present. In addition, to provide a flavor of daily living in early Nebraska, they will feature excerpts from diaries and letters of plains women from the past.

May 6, 2017

History Alive - Gabriel Arthur

History Alive is a program of first-person portrayals of historical figures by presenters who have conducted scholarly research on their characters. Gabriel Arthur is believed to have been the first European American to see the Kanawha Valley while traveling with a band of Indians in 1674. During this time, he followed either the Big Coal River or Paint Creek to the Kanawha River, where he and his party were welcomed at a large Moneton Indian town in the lower Kanawha Valley.

May 4, 2017

American History Told Through Mexican American Eyes

The story of how historical events tie  Americans in general to the Spanish experience in the Americas.….from Cortez to Dia de los Muertos, the co-mingling of cultures contributes to our national heritage.   A quick study to help understand the relevance of Cinco de Mayo, Mexican Independence Day, Hispanic Heritage Month, Dia de los Muertos, Dia de los Ninos and other commemorations crossing over to American mainstream culture.

May 4, 2017

Reporting the War: Freedom of the Press from the American Revolution to War on Terrorism

Join WSU scholar Branden Little in a discussion of "Reporting the War: Freedom of the Press from the American Revolution to War on Terrorism" by John Byrne Cooke.  John Byrne Cooke's fascinating look at wartime reporting from the American Revolution to Iraq. The press has influenced public perception of wars, and often affected their course.

May 3, 2017

Lewis and Clark: What Was Their Value Worth? --Seaman, York, Sacagawea and Pomp Stories

The Corps of Discovery was a fascinating group of individuals. But there were four members of the corps that were “valuable” but not paid. Hunt discusses these four members and tells stories of their adventures. She also dispels a few myths about these members.

May 1, 2017

Martha C. Nussbaum, world-renowned philosopher, distinguished author, and law professor, will deliver the 2017 Jefferson Lecture in the Humanities.

Nussbaum is the University of Chicago’s Ernst Freund Distinguished Service Professor of Law and Ethics. In November 2016, Japan’s Inamori Foundation awarded her the Kyoto Prize in Arts and Philosophy, noting that she “has led global discourse on philosophical topics that influence the human condition in profound ways.” 

Her Jefferson lecture topic, “Powerlessness and the Politics of Blame,” will draw from her latest book project. The project brings a philosophical view to political crises in America, Europe, and India by offering a deeper understanding of how fear, anger, disgust, and envy interact to create a divisiveness that threatens democracies.

May 1, 2017

Law Day 2017 – The 24th Amendment and Just Mercy

Law Day is held on May 1st every year to celebrate the role of law in our society and to cultivate a deeper understanding of the legal profession.

May 1, 2017 to May 31, 2017

Architects and Architecture of the West Virginia Coalfields

The exhibit will feature the careers of several prominent architects including Hassel Thomas Hicks and Alex B. Mahood who designed many of the buildings that were built in the region. The exhibit will also feature many prominent buildings designed by these men as well as the work of other architects.

May 1, 2017 to May 31, 2017

Texas Writers

This Humanities Texas traveling exhibition surveys the vitality and breadth of creative writing in Texas from the mid-twentieth century to the turn of the twenty-first century. It provides an overview of the literary accomplishments of Texas writers in a series of panels featuring portraits of authors, books, workplaces, narrative settings, and evocative quotations.

April 2017

April 29, 2017

Telling Veterans Story: Southwest Florida

Don’t miss this dramatic performance by veterans in the Naples/Fort Myers area who will share their riveting personal stories of life and the military on stage in Telling: Southwest Florida. Their presentations–scripted using their own words–are followed by a moderated question-answer session with the audience.

April 27, 2017

Camp Dodge: Home Away from Home, 1917-1918

Camp Dodge: Home Away From Home, 1917-1918 - A forty-five minute presentation on the organization, construction, disease, camp life, and other facets of military training conducted at Camp Dodge during World War I. The presentation includes an accompanying slide show of period photographs from the Iowa Gold Star Military Museum collection.

April 26, 2017

What Do Our Constitutions Mean?

Anthony Johnstone considers today’s legal and political controversies through the lens of the United States and Montana Constitutions. He draws on the text and history of those documents, as well as the principles and practices of We the People, that work together to shape constitutional meaning from the halls of the United States Supreme Court to the streets of Montana. Through lively and wide-ranging discussions, participants will explore sometimes surprising perspectives that take us beyond current divisions and into the shared civic vocabulary found in our federal and state constitutions.

April 24, 2017

Writers from North Carolina's Literary Hall of Fame

The shared past of these authors is the Civil War and its aftermath which gave North Carolina a distinctive history, literature, music, and lifestyle. We will find common motifs in this series including attachment to place as well as the effects of racism.  They are: Charles Chesnutt, Thomas Wolfe, John Ehle, Reynolds Price, and  Lee Smith.

April 22, 2017

Walt Whitman: “The Good Grey Poet”

Whitman sought to create “a new gospel of beauty”: a uniquely American voice. He escaped the Classic Structures demanded of verse, and gave us the free form voice that has become standard today. His work influenced the beat movement (Jack Kerouac and Alan Ginsberg), anti-war poets & even Bram Stoker (Dracula). Whitman, a volunteer in military hospitals during the civil war, mourned the assassination of President Lincoln with the well-known “Captain, oh my Captain. His last days were spent in Camden, NJ and in his refuge in nature at the Stafford Farm and Timber Creek.

April 20, 2017 to June 3, 2017

Black Art—Ancestral Legacy: The African Impulse in African American Art

This exhibition addresses the question posed by African American poet Countee Cullen in 1926: “What is Africa to me?”  This exhibition provides a number of examples from twentieth-century African American artists—both trained and untrained—that visually respond to this question. These modern artists draw heavily on African influence, while simultaneously reinterpreting it for a different time and place

April 19, 2017

Black National News Service – The Associated Negro Press: The best kept secret of American journalism history

Tuskegee Institute graduate Claude Barnett established the Associated Negro Press in 1919 in Chicago. From the year of its founding through 1964, ANP serviced what is arguably America’s greatest ethnic/group press with a national and international news coverage that was remarkable for its substance and scope.

April 18, 2017

The Battle Over the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint Water Basin

For more than two decades, increasing demands on the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint water basin by Georgia residents, farmers, and other stakeholders have had substantial impacts on the river system in Florida, most dramatically in 2012 when the Bay was declared a fishery disaster by federal officials.

April 17, 2017

New Jersey’s Modern Politics

A survey of the state’s politics and governmental institutions under the Constitution of 1947. In particular, New Jersey’s modern governors will be surveyed.

April 16, 2017

Storysharing at the Institute Library

The Institute Library is sponsoring a monthly story sharing group on the third Thursday of each month from 6:00pm-8:00pm.  The group gives its members an opportunity to share stories in a very informal atmosphere. The stories may be of any kind – traditional folk tales, myths, stories of personal experience, etc. The group is open to all levels of experience, so people with no formal experience of storytelling can try things out in a supportive atmosphere. No one is required to tell; if you simply want to listen for a while that’s fine. If you feel so moved come to the first session with a story ready.

April 15, 2017

"In the Winners Circle" with The Daly Mansion Spring Lecture Series

Lecture series featuring engaging, entertaining presentations topical to Montana History. "In the Winners Circle" will be presented by researcher and writer Cathy Moser.

April 13, 2017

Bandanas to Badges: Songs and Stories of Northwest Workers

Real people and real experiences are the foundation of folk music and stories, and are codified in the lasting representations found in our oral histories. Acoustic trio Trillium-239 shares stories and songs of working life in the Northwest, beginning with American settlement of the West and ending with modern high-tech industries.

April 13, 2017

U.S. Railroad Operations During World War I

U.S. railroad history during World War I, in both its civilian and military aspects, is a fascinating and incredible story. Domestically, the federal government actually “took over” the Class I railroads until 1921. Overseas, the United States Army operated its own trains with American equipment in France. It constructed over 1,000 miles of standard gauge rail in France and hundreds of miles of narrow gauge to the trenches. The Army also sent soldiers to north Russia and to Siberia to operate and to protect American locomotives and freight cars.

April 12, 2017

IN SHAKESPEARE'S GARDEN

 In this illustrated presentation, art historian Laura Mueller will explore plant and garden imagery in the works of William Shakespeare. She will discuss plants with which Shakespeare was familiar, as well as paintings of gardens in Shakespeare’s time and place and in the times and places in which selected scenes from his plays are set.

April 11, 2017

Book Voyagers

A Cartooning Workshop with author/illustrator/teacher Jason Deeble.  Jason Deeble is an American author/illustrator. His first picture book, Sir Ryan's Quest, was published by Roaring Brook Press in 2009.

April 10, 2017

Pope Joan: The History of a Myth

Was there really a pope named Joan? The historical evidence says —that the story is just a myth. But every myth has a history and the history of this particular myth can teach us a great deal about religion, gender relations, and depictions of women in faith and culture from the early Middle Ages to today.

April 8, 2017

Coming Home: How the Humanities Helps Soldiers Find Meaning After War

This talk shares stories of the men and women who signed up to serve during the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, and incorporates experiences and insights from famous writers and philosophers about war and its aftermath. Drawing from hundreds of hours spent with veterans, author and professor Jeb Wyman discusses the profound moral and emotional impact the experience of war has had on them, and how war forever changes those who return from it.

April 6, 2017

The Long Haul: Stories of Human Migration

For more than 200,000 years, Homo sapiens have been moving around the planet, sometimes drawn and sometimes driven by a host of natural and man-made forces: drought, floods, crop failure, war, the quest for survival, or the hope of a better future.  Examine the roots and the routes of human migration from our beginnings in Africa and trace our oft-branching journey into the 21st century.

April 6, 2017

"Growing and Aging" Library Series

The schedule of readings for the Spring 2017 NYH R & D Program follows: March 16–Introductory/ Orientation Session: selected readings from A History Of Old Age, Ed. Pat Thane; March 23–Tinkers by Paul Harding; March 30–Selected Readings from A History Of Old Age, Ed. Pat Thane, with individual participants’ presentations on selected readings; April 6–Selected Readings from Literature And Aging: An Anthology, Eds. Martin Kohn, et al., with individual participants’ presentations on selected readings; April 13th.  Selected Readings from Literature And Aging: An Anthology, Eds. Martin Kohn, et al., with individual participants’ presentations on selected readings; and April 20–Selected Readings from In Our Prime: The Invention of Middle Age by Patricia Cohen, with individual participants’ presentations on selected readings, and concluding remarks. Program readings are available at the Roxbury Library or through the Four County Library System.

April 5, 2017

Emerging Writers Series: Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi

Azareen Van Der Vliet Oloomi is the author of Fra Keeler and Call Me Zebra (forthcoming from Houghton Mifflin Harcourt in February 2018). She is the winner of a 2015 Whiting Writers' Award, a National Book Foundation "5" under 35" honoree, the recipient of a MacDowell Fellowship, and a Fulbright Fellowship in Fiction to Catalonia, Spain. Her work has appeared in The Paris ReviewGRANTA, Guernica, BOMB, and the Los Angeles Review of Books Quarterly Journal, among other places. She has lived in Iran, Spain, Italy, the United Arab Emirates, and currently teaches in the M.F.A. Program in Creative Writing at the University of Notre Dame.

April 4, 2017

Washington at War: The Evergreen State in WWI

The reading covers the period between the successful Prohibition referendum in 1914 through Seattle’s General Strike and President Woodrow Wilson’s visit to Washington in 1919. Learn about and discuss this dramatic period of immigration, wartime industrialization, women’s rights, social change, radical labor, epidemic disease, and worldwide turmoil

April 3, 2017

Leaders and Scholars in American Indian Academia

Sponsored By: Center for American Indian Studies, BHSU.

April 2, 2017

Home Ground on Montana Public Radio

Guests engage in in-depth conversations about our past, present and future. We talk about the economy, our religious views, schools, courts, wolves, medicine, the timber industry, conservation, life in prison, life on the farm... We discuss our most serious personal, political and community values, and our place in the larger world.

April 1, 2017

A Fierce Language: Falling in Love with Poetry

Drawing on diverse poets, including the rich contribution of Washington State’s poets, poet and performer Judith Adams takes us on a journey to rediscover the music, power, humor, and strength of poetry, showing how it can radically enhance, change, and even save our lives. She’ll also discuss the joy of reciting poetry by heart, listen to audience members’ experience with poetry, and lead exercises to fire up the poet in all of us.

April 1, 2017

Cubans and Cuban-Americans Communities of Yesterday and Today: A Bilingual Exhibition

An exhibition highlighting the presence of Cubans and Cuban-Americans in West-Central Florida, including the 19th century Cuban ranchos fishing industry, the late 19th century Ybor City cigar industry, and the unique stories of individual Cubans and Cuban-Americans who live in south-west Florida and contribute to our communities today.

March 2017

March 30, 2017

Free Speech in Times of Crisis

 "Congress shall make no law...abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press..." With these simple words in the First Amendment, U.S. citizens are granted an inalienable right to express their opinions, a right that does not dissipate at times when society us under stress and disagreements get heated. Even when we do not agree with someone's language, we believe in the speaker's right to utter it -- and that if we disagree with someone's speech, the best response is more speech.

January 2017

January 2, 2017 to March 31, 2017

The Road to the Promised Land: Martin Luther King Jr. and the Civil Rights

Featuring photographs, facsimiles of landmark documents, and quotations by Dr. King and others engaged in the struggle for civil rights, this Humanities Texas traveling exhibition surveys the Civil Rights Movement from the emergence of Martin Luther King Jr. in the Montgomery bus boycott of 1955 through the 1990s.

December 2016

December 2, 2016 to March 31, 2017

Remnants of the Rice Culture: Agricultural History as Art

Remnants of the Rice Culture – Agricultural History As Art, an exhibition of photographs by David Shriver Soliday, showcases the genesis and genealogy of the coastal rice production complex once known as the Rice Empire. This collection documents man’s 300-year-old record upon the landscape and explores the intersection between agricultural history and art.

January 2014

January 15, 2014 to December 31, 2017

In Pursuit of Freedom

Exhibition on the unsung heroes of Brooklyn’s anti-slavery movement