MUSSELS, MOONSHINE, MUSIC: MISSISSIPPI VALLEY MIGRANTS IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY

November 27, 2016

A Road Scholar Program by Dennis Stroughmatt

In a time almost forgotten, the Midwest and upper South were home to thousands of Americans who lived and worked along or on the rivers as sharecroppers, fishermen, mussel shellers, button cutters, traveling minstrels, and even moonshiners. Work was their lives, and the work was hard. Although they were the backbone of industry in cities like Muscatine, Iowa, and Cairo, Illinois, they played too, enjoying the music of Memphis and St. Louis along their way.

Musician and cultural historian Dennis Stroughmatt will lead a voyage of discovery incorporating artifacts, photographs, folktales, and performances in river-based musical styles passed down from his mussel-shelling and river-working grandfather Chancy Stroughmatt’s generation. He will invite audiences to visit the history of early-20th-century Illinois and even sing along to the music of the age.

This event is Free and Open to the public.

Funded project of the Illinois Humanities, supported in part by the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) and the Illinois General Assembly [through the Illinois Arts Council Agency], as well as by contributions from individuals, foundations and corporations.

For more information regarding this event:

Time: 2:00 pm

Contact: Illinois Humanities Phone: (312) 422-5580
Batavia Public Library District
10 S Batavia Avenue
Batavia, IL 60510-2449
United States
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