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Women Voted in New York Before Columbus

March 26, 2016

Imagine that women have the right to choose all political representatives, removing from office anyone who doesn't make wise decisions for the future. Living in a world free from violence against them, women will not allow a man to hold office if he has violated a woman. Economically independent, they have the final say in matters of war and peace and the absolute right to their own bodies.

This is not a dream. Haudenosaunee (traditional Iroquois) women have had this authority and more -- since long before Christopher Columbus came to these shores.

While white women were the property of their husbands and considered dead in the law, Haudenosaunee women had more authority and status before Columbus l than New York State women have today. Women of the Six Nation Iroquois Confederacy (the Haudenosaunee) had the responsibility for putting in place the male leaders. They had control of their own bodies and were economically independent. Rape and wife beating were rare and dealt with harshly; committing violence against a woman kept a man from becoming Chief in this egalitarian, gender-balanced society. When women in New York State began to organize for their rights in 1848, they took their cue from the nearby Haudenosaunee communities, where women lived in the world that non-native women dreamed. Amazingly, despite the assimilation policy of the United States, Haudenosaunee women still maintain much of this authority today.

The 2017 centennial of woman suffrage in New York State opens the opportunity for us to explore this new -- yet very old -- and unknown history of our region. The format of the talk is an informal, story-telling presentation followed by interaction with the audience designed to give you a platform to share knowledge, insights and experiences.

Funded project of the New York Council for the Humanities.  The mission of the New York Council for the Humanities is to provide leadership and support across the state’s intellectual and cultural sectors through grants, programs, networking and advocacy in order to encourage critical thinking and cultural understanding in the public arena.

Founded in 1975 as the National Endowment for the Humanities’ partner in New York State, the New York Council for the Humanities is the sole statewide proponent of public access to the humanities.  The Council is a private 501(c)3 that receives Federal, State, City and private funding.

For more information regarding this event:

Time: 1:00 pm

Contact: Cheri Crist Phone: (585) 428-7300
Rochester Public Library
115 South Avenue
Rochester, NY
United States
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