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July 2014

 

the latest from FedState — July 17, 2014



The National Council on the Humanities met the Digital Public Library of America at its July meeting. NEH helped get DPLA off the ground. Click the image for a universe of possibilities.


working together / National History Day


Acting NEH Chair Carole Watson awarded six NEH prizes to California students during National History Day in June.
Acting NEH Chair Carole Watson awarded six NEH prizes to California students during National History Day in June.

NEH sponsors the National History Day first-prize winners of exhibits, documentaries, performances, papers, and websites. During the national competition in June, it held an educators' workshop on Chronicling America and EDSITEment, awarded two "Chronicling America: Historic American Newspaper" prizes, and hosted a breakfast on Capitol Hill and meetings of NHD contestants with their members of Congress. This year the Maryland Humanities Council, coordinator of History Day in Maryland, won its second Gold Medal. Congratulations!


 


how do you say that? how do you talk about that?


"Do you live in Washington or WaRshington? If it-s the latter, you almost certainly drink waRter." -Washington Post
"Do you live in Washington or WaRshington? If it’s the latter, you almost certainly drink waRter." —Washington Post

Garage, water, route, tomato, aunt, wash, oil, theater, iron, salmon, fire, sure, crayon, toilet, New Orleans, pecan, again, probably, spitting image, Alabama,coupon, mayonnaise, syrup, pajamas

Does DC have dialects? The Washington Post reports that the Humanities Council of Washington, DC hosted a forum on DC dialects with Minnie Annan, a Georgetown University linguistics doctoral student. "'Start talking about a D.C. dialect, and you’re pretty much guaranteed ... an animated discussion,' says Annan.


 

Has the essence of what it is to be human shifted over time? How might science and technology challenge and reshape our understanding of what it means to be human?

Prakash Chenjeri addresses these questions during an Oregon Humanities Conversation Project program, part of the "Beyond Human?" series. Other series are "Life after War," "Why Aren't There More Black People in Oregon?," and "Church and State."
 


"skin in the game"


Rebecca Lyon, Tlingit/Haida Woman (detail; copper, glass, dentalium shells, hide, shell buttons). Rasmuson Foundation Art Acquisition Fund to the Anchorage Museum.
Rebecca Lyon, Tlingit/Haida Woman (detail; copper, glass, dentalium shells, hide, shell buttons). Rasmuson Foundation Art Acquisition Fund to the Anchorage Museum.

Jeff Baird writes in the Rasmuson Foundation blog that "one of the primary responsibilities of a board is to ensure the nonprofit they lead is on sound financial footing. When board members make cash gifts ..., they show their understanding that raising funds is essential to the financial stability of their organization.... [V]olunteering is extremely valuable. But dollars and services are not interchangeable. Volunteerism can’t do it all." Banker Elmer Rasmuson believed in the importance of "having 'skin in the game'" before asking others to invest.



 


Follow "John Doy's Escape," a Kansas Humanities Council Shared Stories of the Civil War reader's theater script, on Twitter #JD1859.


 

When tornadoes hit the small northeast Nebraska town of Pilger in June, Humanities Nebraska was hosting Chautauqua in the nearby town of Norfolk. To help the community, the performers organized an event at a restaurant/bar with the free will donations to benefit the local tornado relief efforts.
 

Arizona Humanities presents musician/educator/journalist Janice Jarrett who talks about how math and music interplay through resonance, harmony, sympathetic vibrations, overtones, and timbre.

 

Journalist Roxana Saberi hosts Game Changer, the North Dakota Humanities Council's annual event that will go behind the headlines of "America and the Middle East" in Fargo on October 9th.

 

Two NEH supported documentaries have been nominated for Emmys: "Superheroes: A Never-Ending Battle" and "The African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross with Henry Louis Gates, Jr."

 

Minnesota Humanities Center's Braided Lives: An Anthology of Multicultural American Writing amplifies over forty different voices, bringing their distinctive sounds and stories to high school readers. Now out of print, the entire contents are available as free pdf downloads on the Absent Narratives Resource Collection.


 

FEDERAL/STATE PARTNERSHIP
National Endowment for the Humanities
400 7th Street, SW, Washington, DC 20506
202.606.8254, main number — 202.606.8365, fax

Edie Manza, director, 202.606.8257 [ about ]
Kathleen Mitchell, senior program officer, 202.606.8302 [ about ]
Meg Ferris McReynolds, program officer, 202.208.7100 [ about ]
Shirley Newman, program assistant, 202.606.8254 [ about ]

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