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NEH Announces $6.7 Million in Fellowships to 180 U.S. Scholars

Faculty Research Awards Go to 19 at Historically Black, Hispanic-Serving, and Tribal Institutions

WASHINGTON, D.C. (February 9, 2004) -- The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) today announced that it has awarded a total of $6.7 million in fellowships to 180 U.S. scholars for their individual research in the humanities. An additional 19 faculty members at Historically Black, Hispanic-Serving, and Tribal Colleges and Universities will receive a total of $648,000 in Faculty Research Awards for their individual or collaborative projects.

"Through their research on a broad range of humanities topics, NEH fellows and Faculty Research Award recipients will deepen our understanding of ourselves and our world," said NEH Chairman Bruce Cole. "When completed, their work will benefit scholars, students, and lovers of knowledge for many years to come."

NEH fellowships support individuals pursuing advanced research that contributes to scholarly knowledge or to the general public's understanding of the humanities. Recipients usually produce scholarly articles, monographs on specialized subjects, books on broad topics, archaeological site reports, translations, editions, or other scholarly tools. Faculty Research Awards support projects that make similar contributions in the form of publications, presentations, and classroom teaching. Among the NEH fellowships awarded this year are the following:

  • Howard J. Pollack, University of Houston, for "Gershwin: A Critical Biography";
  • Seth L Schein, University of California, Davis, for "An Edition with Commentary of Sophocles's 'Philoctetes'";
  • Anthony Colantuono, University of Maryland, College Park, for "The Culture of Prudence: Advice, Control, and Artistic Creativity in Early Modern Italy"; and
  • Christopher J. Kelly, Boston College, for "Translation of Short Works by Jean-Jacques Rousseau."

Among this year's Faculty Research Award recipients, Robert Murie and Matthew Herman, both of Stone Child College in Box Elder, Mont., will collaborate on "Retrieval, Validation, and Protection of Historical Records of Rocky Boy's Chippewa Cree." The Endowment received 1,289 eligible applications for NEH fellowships and 117 for Faculty Research Awards. Full-term (9- to 12-month) NEH fellowships and Faculty Research Awards carry a stipend of $40,000. Recipients may opt for a shorter term (6 to 8 months), which carries a stipend of $24,000. This year's fellows and Faculty Research Award recipients represent 38 states and the District of Columbia. [A state-by-state list with names and affiliations of this year's recipients is available as an Adobe PDF file in the above box.]

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About the National Endowment for the Humanities

Created in 1965 as an independent federal agency, the National Endowment for the Humanities supports research and learning in history, literature, philosophy, and other areas of the humanities by funding selected, peer-reviewed proposals from around the nation. Additional information about the National Endowment for the Humanities and its grant programs is available at: www.neh.gov.

Media Contacts: Office of Communications at (202) 606-8446 or info@neh.gov