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Special Edition

Black Muslim rally, Harlem, 1963

Civil Rights and the Changing World

How history was made and how it's being written

By Earl Lewis

Volume 34, Issue 1.5

Mother's Day, May 14, 1961: a Greyhound bus carrying the Freedom Riders was attacked by a mob who slashed its tires, and then firebombed the disabled vehicle outside of Anniston, Alabama.

Birmingham Civil Rights Institute

  • Features

    NAACP parade with marchers carrying a coffin for Jim Crow.

    From Freedom to Equality with NEH

    “We hold these truths to be self-evident,” wrote Thomas Jefferson in the Declaration of Independence.

    By David Skinner
    Rosa Parks, arrested, Montgomery, December 1, 1955

    From Freedom to Equality Around the Nation

    “We hold these truths to be self-evident,” wrote Thomas Jefferson in the Declaration of Independence.

    By David Skinner
    Fannie Lou Hamer at the Democratic National Convention in August 1964.

    Living History in Mississippi

    Oral history, an essential ingredient in capturing state's role in civil rights movement.

    By Esther Ferington
    Actors from Slavery by Another Name

    Re-enslaved

    How African-American bondage came back after emancipation.

    By Lynette Holloway
    Scene from "The Abolitionists"

    The Agitator

    William Lloyd Garrison burned the Constitution as he roared against the injustice of slavery.

    By James Williford
    Image of segregated bus station in Durham, North Carolina, 1940

    Freedom Riders

    Telling 436 stories in one documentary.

    By Amy Lifson
    Richard and Mildred Loving in 1965.

    The Right to Love

    The freedom to marry across racial lines was tested by a shy Virginia couple, who were very much in love.

    By Donna M. Lucey
  • Departments

    EdNote

    Chairman's Note

    To mark the one hundred and fiftieth anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation and the fiftieth anniversary of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, the National Endowment for the Humanities is highlighting the arc of American history that scholars have called “the long civil rights movement.”

    By Jim Leach

    Special support has been provided by the following corporations:

     

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