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Past Events

September 2016

September 27, 2016

Recovering the M4 Enigma Machine, an oral history

During WWII the German navy used a cipher machine called Enigma to encipher and decipher messages. The machine was onboard of the U-85, one of the U-boats operating off the coast of the Outer Banks, and went down with the ship when it sank in April of 1942. The Enigma machine was not recovered and remained entombed in the U-boat until 2001 when it was found by a team of local divers.

September 25, 2016

Home Ground on Montana Public Radio

Home Ground’s guests tell us who they are, what they think and what they are doing about it. Those diverse stories help us to think more deeply – about what we believe and why.

Our guests engage in in-depth conversations about our past, present and future. We talk about the economy, our religious views, schools, courts, wolves, medicine, the timber industry, conservation, life in prison, life on the farm... We discuss our most serious personal, political and community values, and our place in the larger world.

September 22, 2016

Grant Writing Workshop with the Montana History Foundation

These workshops build capacity in Montana's rural arts and cultural nonprofits and allow them to compete effectively for grant dollars from multiple sources.

September 21, 2016 to September 25, 2016

The Montana Book Festival

The Montana Book Festival is a celebration of literary arts held each fall in downtown Missoula that seeks to provide a dynamic, evolving forum for literary engagement, as well as to foster literary community and enthusiasm for the written word among readers of all ages.

September 19, 2016

The Tar Heel Traveler - Stories from the Road

Scott Mason may have the best job in television. He travels all over North Carolina, usually steering clear of highways and bounding instead along bumpy roads and off-beaten paths. He uncovers hidden gems everywhere he goes: people and places full of feeling and flavor—and wonder. In this presentation, he celebrates the colorful characters, out-of-the-way places, and rich history of North Carolina. He will share with audiences the stories behind the stories. North Carolina is brimming with intriguing stories. To take a trip with the Tar Heel Traveler is to experience the wonderful nooks and crannies that form the bedrock of the state.

September 15, 2016

Common Heritage: Sheboygan's Historic Connections (Mead Public Library, Sheboygan, WI)

Mead Public Library hosts the History of Sheboygan series, presented by Beth Dippel, Director of the Sheboygan County Historical Research Center. 

September 14, 2016

Ratification of the Constitution in New Hampshire

The Granite State came very close to voting against ratification of the proposed Federal Constitution. Had it done so, the nation we know today might not exist. What tactics did supporters of ratification use to snatch victory from defeat?

September 11, 2016

Family Stories: How and Why to Remember and Tell Them

Storytelling connects strangers, strengthens links between generations, and gives children the self-knowledge to carry them through hard times. Knowledge of family history has even been linked to better teen behavior and mental health.

September 10, 2016

Freeport Waters Exhibit dedication

Join us for the dedication of the Freeport Waters exhibit, which explores the maritime heritage and traditions of Freeport's history. This permanent exhibit features historic and contemporary photographs, web links and an artistic design along the famed "Nautical Mile."

September 8, 2016

Undocumented Immigrant Youth: Listening to Students and Forging a New Path

New York is home to over 750,000 undocumented immigrants many of whom live in mixed-status families. This presentation will address state and national policies through the lens of some remarkable undocumented youth, to illustrate the realities, challenges and opportunities they face through high school, college, and beyond.

September 8, 2016

A Visit with Abraham Lincoln

Abraham Lincoln, portrayed by Steve Wood, begins this program by recounting his early life and ends with a reading of the "Gettysburg Address." Along the way he comments on the debates with Stephen Douglas, his run for the presidency, and the Civil War.  

September 6, 2016

Poor Houses and Town Farms: The Hard Row for Paupers

From its earliest settlements New Hampshire has struggled with issues surrounding the treatment of its poor. The early Northeastern colonies followed the lead of England's 1601 Poor Law, which imposed compulsory taxes for maintenance of the poor but made no distinction between the "vagrant, vicious poor" and the helpless, and honest poor. This confusion persisted for generations and led directly to establishment in most of the state's towns of alms houses and poor farms and, later, county institutions which would collectively come to form a dark chapter in New Hampshire history.

September 1, 2016

Banjos, Bones, and Ballads

Traditional songs, rich in local history and a sense of place, present the latest news from the distant past. They help us to interpret present-day life with an understanding of the working people who built our country. Tavern songs, banjo tunes, 18th century New England hymns, sailor songs, and humorous stories about traditional singers and their songs highlight this informative program by Jeff Warner.

August 2016

August 30, 2016

Stark Decency: New Hampshire's World War II German Prisoner of War Camp

During World War II, 300 German prisoners of war were held at Camp Stark near the village of Stark in New Hampshire's North Country. Allen Koop reveals the history of this camp, which tells us much about our country's war experience and about our state.  

August 24, 2016

The Music History of French-Canadians, Franco-Americans, Acadians, and Cajuns

Lucie Therrien follows the migration of French-Canadians and the evolution of their traditional music:  its arrival in North America from France; the music's crossing with Indian culture during the evangelization of Acadia and Quebec; its growth alongside English culture after British colonization; and its expansion from Quebec to New England, as well as from Acadia to Louisiana. 

August 21, 2016

Lafayette and the Farewell Tour: An American Idol

General Lafayette, born the Marquis de Lafayette in Auvergne, France, was truly an American Idol in the 19th century. One proof is that more than 80 American counties, cities, towns, and countless roads were named in his honor, from Lafayette Road in Portsmouth to Mount Lafayette in Franconia. Lafayette's extraordinary reputation was based on his military record in the Revolution, his friendship with George Washington, his continued support of American interests, his story-book life, and perhaps most importantly, his Farewell Tour of America when he visited all 24 states and Washington D.C. as the last surviving major general of the Continental Army.

August 18, 2016

Common Heritage: Sheboygan's Infrastructure: From its Scenic Parks to its Fire Department (Mead Public Library, Sheboygan, WI)

Mead Public Library hosts the History of Sheboygan series, presented by Beth Dippel, Director of the Sheboygan County Historical Research Center.

August 16, 2016

Home Ground on Yellowstone Public Radio

Home Ground’s guests tell us who they are, what they think and what they are doing about it. Those diverse stories help us to think more deeply – about what we believe and why.

August 14, 2016

New England's Colonial Meetinghouses and their Impact on American Society

New England's colonial meetinghouses embody an important yet little-known chapter in American history. Built mostly with tax money, they served as both places of worship and places for town meetings, and were the centers of life in colonial New England communities.

August 13, 2016

Hands-on History: Visions from the Past Family Day

How do historians use primary sources to figure out what happened in the past? Children will have the opportunity to handle vintage letters or postcards and get creative trying to figure out what the people who sent them might have looked like or how they might have lived.

August 11, 2016

Ancient Wars/Modern Vets

Peter Meineck offers short readings from contemporary translations of ancient texts to elucidate the connections between the experience of the American veteran community and the ancient Greeks and Romans.

August 11, 2016

Mary Todd Lincoln: Wife and Widow

Living historian Sally Mummey portrays Mary Todd Lincoln as she muses on her life from her dreams as a girl to her years as First Lady during the Civil War. Mrs. Lincoln shares stories of her life with President Lincoln and the events of that evening in Ford's Theatre when the assassin's bullet not only changed the course of the nation but destroyed her life as well.

August 8, 2016

Poor Houses and Town Farms: The Hard Row for Paupers

From its earliest settlements New Hampshire has struggled with issues surrounding the treatment of its poor. The early Northeastern colonies followed the lead of England's 1601 Poor Law, which imposed compulsory taxes for maintenance of the poor but made no distinction between the "vagrant, vicious poor" and the helpless, and honest poor.

August 5, 2016

The Indian Education of Lewis and Clark with Dr. Hal Stearns

A soldier-humanist, retired general Dr. Hal Stearns has traveled the trail from Monticello to Fort Clatsop. In this presentation, he is Captain William Clark looking back in time. Without question, the Corps to the Northwest needed Native Americans to succeed in accomplishing their two-plus year trip. Indians provided knowledge, food, great generosity, stories, and momentous moments. The trek West by the Corps was and is America's great land expedition. Indians and "Indian ways" added much to their success.

August 4, 2016

Democratic Vistas: Environmental Democracy

New York  Assemblyman Englebright and Meteorologist Tom Wysmuller will lead a Panel discussion about Long Island environmental concerns, including Sea Level issues.

August 2, 2016

Exploration and Discoveries of George Bird Grinnell, Father of Glacier Park with Hugh Grinnell

The great West that George Bird Grinnell first encountered in 1870 as a 21-year-old man was shortly to disappear before his eyes. Nobody was quicker to sense the desecration or was more eloquent in crusading against the poachers, the hide-hunters, and the disengaged U.S. Congress than George Bird Grinnell, the “Father of American Conservation.”

July 2016

July 31, 2016

Water/Ways - Museum on Main Street

In Minnesota, the Humanities Center and its partners are developing two complementary traveling exhibits that tell a Minnesota story.

We Are Water is an interactive story collecting exhibit that focuses on individuals’ relationships with and responsibilities to water. The exhibit includes stories from people reflecting on the meaning and experience of water in the state of Minnesota as a whole, stories from people local to a host site community, and space for visitors to the exhibit to add their own stories and images. Water connects. Listen to others. Share your stories.

How’s the Water? focuses on water quantity and quality and Minnesota’s unique position as the source of three major U.S. watersheds. Exhibit-goers learn about overall conditions of Minnesota’s lakes, rivers, streams, groundwater, and water infrastructure. How’s the Water? also raises awareness about health equity issues and water in our state. The exhibit then connects Minnesotans to solutions, providing ways to sign up to be a citizen scientist, use water sustainably, and manage runoff.

July 30, 2016

In the Kitchen with Laura

 In the Kitchen With Laura mixes stories and information about Laura Ingalls Wilder’s life with food history and hands on cooking. It’s the 1930s and we find ourselves in Laura’s kitchen as she’s dealing with all the food coming in from a bountiful summer garden.

July 29, 2016

Increase Engagement Through Absent Narratives

Increase Engagement Through Absent Narratives is an all-day workshop that prepares participants to have meaningful engagement with their communities. Participants will come away with broadened worldviews and the skills to deepen their personal and professional relationships — outcomes that set a foundation for increased engagement.

July 27, 2016

Veterans Book Group 2016: VA Medical and Regional Office Center

Veterans Book Groups create an opportunity for veterans to explore books, poetry, articles, and short stories, with the goal of fostering camaraderie and a safe space to reflect and share ideas and questions. This series is open to any former Service Member who served in a combat theater.

July 24, 2016

Forgotten Women of the First World War

One hundred years ago, a full generation before Rosie the Riveter, women rolled up their sleeves and entered war industries where they had never been welcome before. They ran powerful machinery, learned new skills, and faced the sullen hostility of the men in the shops. In this illustrated lecture, historian Carrie Brown reveals their courage and their hard work, and explores how these women helped shape the work that their more famous daughters would do in the next World War.

July 21, 2016

Jazz and the American Spirit: Swing, The Great Depression and WWII

Although the country was facing unprecedented hardship, Swing music elevated jazz to new heights — making it the first and only time jazz was America’s popular music.This talk will illuminate the origins of the Great Depression and the key musicians who helped revive the American spirit. Music of the 1930s and 1940s will illustrate the importance of this uniquely American art form and the cultural significance it has played in our country’s history. From the advent of V-Discs (victory discs) and the USO, evidence will be provided on music’s ability to heal a nation through economic devastation and the turmoil of war.

July 21, 2016

Common Heritage: First Familes of Sheboygan: Those Who Built the City (Mead Public Library, Sheboygan, WI)

Mead Public Library hosts the History of Sheboygan series, presented by  Beth Dippel, Director of the Sheboygan County Historical Research Center.

July 17, 2016

Why Treaties Matter: Self-Government in the Dakota and Ojibwe Nation

This traveling exhibit explores relationships between Dakota and Ojibwe Indian Nations and the U.S. government in this place we now call Minnesota. Learn, through a video presentation and 20 banners featuring text and images, how treaties affected the lands and lifeways of the indigenous peoples of this place, and why these binding agreements between nations still matter today.

July 16, 2016

Dutch Oven Cooking Centennial

Wyoming people embrace outdoor camping. This experience can be enhanced with the incorporation of a meal made using a Dutch oven. Jessica Flock explores the history and culture of Dutch oven cooking in this interactive presentation.

July 16, 2016

Common Heritage: Sheboygan's Main Streets: Center Avenue, Pennsylvania Avenue, and 8th Street (Mead Public Library, Sheboygan, WI)

History of Sheboygan series, presented by Beth Dippel, executive director of the Sheboygan County Historical Research Center, on the third Thursday, April through September, at Mead Public Libra

July 15, 2016

Common Heritage: Seneca Veterans Pow Wow (Seneca Nation of Indians, Salamanca, NY)

The two-day event will allow community members to come to our digital booth to scan and copy photos.

July 14, 2016

Brother, Can You Spare A Dime?

 "Brother, Can You Spare a Dime?" views the Depression, with a glance at Montana's early start, not through history and literature, but through songs and "illiterature," looking at what happened to the common folks most affected by it.

July 12, 2016

The Vermont Civil War Songbook

Singer and researcher Linda Radtke, dressed in period costume and joined by pianist Arthur Zorn, shares songs popular in Vermont during the Civil War as well as letters from Vermonters from the era. From sentimental songs about the girl back home to satirical ballads, Ms. Radtke traces the evolution of tone in Vermont popular song, from patriotic to elegiac as the war continued.

July 10, 2016

The Northwest Passage in the Era of Climate Change

This presentation includes a more in-depth look at the science of climate change with the emphasis on the Arctic.

July 9, 2016

The Medicines of Lewis and Clark

 The Lewis and Clark Expedition of 1803-1806 that took approximately 28 months, covered nearly 8000 miles and lost the life of only one member, had a very interesting medical supply list. What were the medicines and the medical practices of the time? Why didn’t Thomas Jefferson send a doctor along? What allowed the members to survive the incidents that occurred? Could this feat be accomplished today?

July 8, 2016

Walt Whitman Live!

In this one hour program, Walt Whitman, portrayed by Dr. Bill Koch, will highlight major poems from his collection Leaves of Grass, as he celebrates 2005 as the 150th anniversary of the publication of Leaves of Grass. In addition, Whitman will pay tribute to Abraham Lincoln, on the occasion of the 140th anniversary of the Lincoln assassination, with a description of the nation’s obsequies, and recitations of the Gettysburg Address and “O Captain, My Captain."

July 7, 2016

History in your Backyard - A Coast Salish Woman’s Life on Oyster Bay

“So many stories, all changing by the minute, all swirling and braiding and weaving and spinning and stitching themselves one to another,” writes Brian Doyle in the novel Mink River. These words could just as well apply to LLyn De Danaan’s book Katie Gale: A Coast Salish Woman’s Life on Oyster Bay, about a pioneering Native woman whose extraordinary life swayed wildly between triumphs and tragedies. The book forms the foundation of her Speakers Bureau talk “History in your Backyard,” a discussion of how she discovered this local history and how chance, perseverance, and interpretive storytelling can lead you to find fascinating history in your own community. Her talk shows the people and the artifacts that helped “stitch” Gales story together, and helps guide you in uncovering your own "backyard" tale.

July 6, 2016

The Finest Hours: The True Story Behind the U.S. Coast Guard’s Most Daring Sea Rescue

Author Michael Tougias tells the story of the historic rescue of 70 sailors on two sinking ships during a 1952 blizzard off the coast of New England. Tougias will use over fifty original photographs of the rescue and explain some of the acts of heroism and leadership so astonishing that Disney has collaborated with Tougias to make a movie about the event.

July 2, 2016

A Visit with Teddy Roosevelt with Arch Ellwein

Meet the vibrant 26th president of the United States, Theodore Roosevelt. Even Roosevelt's critics admired the man who took on the corporate trusts, charged up San Juan Hill, defied the Party "bosses," built the Panama Canal, defined conservation and won a Nobel Peace Prize. Hear his views on conservation, agriculture, and democracy, all shaped by his Western experience. Portrayed by Ellwein, President Roosevelt talks of his experiences in Montana as a rancher and sportsman. Following his "press conference," the actor/historian comes out of character for further discussion.

June 2016

June 30, 2016

The Girl Who Struck Out Babe Ruth

Back in the old days, long before spring training became a well-oiled, money-making machine, teams would head down south somewhere to sweat out the winter pounds and get ready for the new season. On the way home -- via train, of course -- teams would stop off in towns and cities along the way and play exhibition games.

One of those stops for the New York Yankees in 1931 came in Chattanooga, Tennessee on April 2. Joe Engel, the new president of the Double-A Lookouts, was a showman and promoter as much as a baseball guy. A few days before the Yankees arrived, he announced he had signed a 17-year-old pitcher named Jackie Mitchell.

Jackie was a girl.  And she was going to pitch against the Yankees.

What happened from there is a matter of folklore.

June 28, 2016 to July 26, 2016

The Blessings of Liberty: The U.S. Constitution

This exhibition seeks to explain the immense importance of a document that holds answers to challenging questions of government and features twelve panels charting the progress of former colonies to a united nation.

June 27, 2016

Invisible New England: The Real New England?

Let's Talk About It is a free, library-based reading and discussion program for people who want to talk with others about what they have read, presented in collaboration with the Maine State Library!

 

June 24, 2016

The Dog Soldier Ledgerbook

The Dog Soldier ledger book was picked up on the Summit Springs battlefield in 1969. It provides a history of the Cheyenne Dog Soldiers between the Sand Creek Massacre in 1864 and Summit Springs in 1869. Cheyenne people assisted in identifying artists (the book is the work of multiple artists), individuals and events. Thus the publication of the ledger book draws on both Cheyenne oral history and archival research. Cheyenne mixed blood George Bent expressed the wish that a photographer had been able to capture the Dog Soldiers in all their glory, but the ledger book provides a worthy substitute for photography. It provides an accurate account of Dog Soldier history and is so accurate in details that one can identify weapons and uniform items used by soldiers such as Smith carbines and Colt revolving carbines. That evidence, combined with research in military records allows the identification of U.S. military units and specific events.

June 23, 2016

Reflections West on Yellowstone Public Radio

Reflections West's aim is simple: to circulate—as widely as possible—wonderful passages of literature and history of the West in a thoughtful and thought-provoking way. In short, we present reflections in order to spur further reflections from our listeners based on their own knowledge and experience.

June 21, 2016

Fly! Bessie! Fly!

In 1921 Bessie Coleman became the first African American woman to earn a pilot’s license. Never one to let other people define her limitations, she traveled to France to learn to fly when American flight schools refused her because of her race. In later years she shared her experiences with children, encouraging them with the words, “you too can fly.”

June 19, 2016

Muslim Journeys

The books in "Muslim Journeys" tell provocative and gripping stories about the experiences of Muslims around the world and in the United States, providing insight into a diverse array of contemporary Muslim lives.

June 18, 2016

Neighbor2Neighbor Series: Islamic Family Experience

A unique opportunity to engage in meaningful dialogue with our Muslim neighbors. The Neighbor2Neighbor Series is part of Humanities Tennessee's Conversations Bureau program and is presented in partnership with the Faith & Culture Center, the Muslim Women & Council, and the Nashville International Center for Empowerment, with generous support from the Nissan Foundation of Middle Tennessee.

June 18, 2016

Common Heritage: Community History Harvest (Grand Valley State University, Allendale, MI)

We will be recording oral histories and digitizing old photos, scrapbooks, letters, and other materials related to the history of Oceana County, Michigan.

June 18, 2016

Common Heritage: Community Scanning Day (Troy University, Troy, AL)

Area residents are invited to bring up to 12 items of family history to be scanned. The Wiregrass Archives will upload the scans with index information to Alabama Mosaic.

June 18, 2016

Common Heritage: Scan Day (Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum, Cleveland, OH)

The Rock & Roll Hall of Fame’s Library and Archives is asking the community to help preserve rock and roll history!

June 16, 2016

Poetry & Discussion with Eric McHenry, Poet Laureate of Kansas

The Poet Laureate of Kansas promotes the humanities as a public resource for all Kansans with readings and discussions about poetry in communities across the state.  Eric McHenry of Lawrence is the 2015-2017 Poet Laureate of Kansas. A nationally known poet and associate professor of English at Washburn University in Topeka, his work has been featured in publications such as Poetry International, Slate, Yale Review, and Topeka magazine, among many others.  A fifth-generation Topeka native, Eric has been nominated for the Pushcart Prize for poetry seven times and received the Theodore Roethke Prize in 2011. His first book of poems, Potscrubber Lullabies, earned him the prestigious Kate Tufts Discovery Award in 2007, the largest American prize for a first book of poetry.

June 15, 2016

"Color-Brave" Community Read: Between the World and Me

Fit Oshkosh,Inc. has been facilitating conversations about race in the Fox Valley and nationally since 2012. This year's Color-Brave read is the #1 New York Times bestseller and National Book Award finalist book entitled 'Between the World and Me' (2015) by Ta-Nehisi Coates and published by Spiegel & Grau. 'Between the World and Me' is written as a letter to the author's teenaged son about the feelings, symbolism, and realities associated with being black in the United States.

 

June 14, 2016

American Diplomatic History: From George Washington to Barack Obama

Professor Michael Rockland’s first career was in diplomacy, serving with our embassies in Argentina and in Spain as a cultural attaché. One of the latest of his books is An American Diplomat in Franco Spain and he has long taught the course, “The United States as Seen From Abroad” at Rutgers. Thus, diplomacy has been both his vocation and his avocation for many years. In lecturing on American diplomacy he endeavors to trace the evolution of the United States from a nation dedicated to George Washington’s argument in favor of “no entangling alliances” to a nation that has, in some instances, gone in the other direction.

June 13, 2016 to July 22, 2016

Crossroads of Empire: Early Printed Maps of the American Southwest

Based on an exhibition organized by the Amon Carter Museum and The University of Texas at Arlington Library, this Humanities Texas traveling exhibition spans the mapmaking enterprise, beginning with the earliest known map to show the Texas edge of the Gulf (1512) and ending with an 1873 map of Texas showing the right of way granted to railroads.

June 11, 2016

Oldies But Goodies: Music of the Early 1960s

This walk down memory lane concentrates on the music of the beginning of the decade of massive cultural change prior to the “British Invasion.” The discussion will include America’s emphasis on its youth through the music of: The Beach Boys; Bob Dylan; James Brown; The Righteous Brothers; The Ronettes; etc. Included are audio and video examples of the above-mentioned artists plus early newsreels.

June 11, 2016

Common Heritage: Uncommon Quilts Exhibition and Digitization Event (Montclair Historical Society, Montclair, NJ)

On June 11 at 10 AM textile conservation expert Alison Castaneda presents a Quilt Preservation Workshop.

June 10, 2016 to September 5, 2016

American Epics: Thomas Hart Benton and Hollywood

This ambitious exhibition of Thomas Hart Benton (1889–1975), the first in more than twenty-five years, reveals the important but overlooked connection between Benton’s experience wor

June 8, 2016

Frank Lloyd Wright or was he wrong?

There is a story (true or not) that Frank Lloyd Wright once testified in court that he was the world’s greatest living architect. “I had no choice,” he later explained, “I was under oath.” During his extended lifetime (he lived into his nineties), Wright and his architecture were far less admired than today. He was almost always controversial, as much for his single-mindedness and his point-blank way of speaking as for his architectural achievements. Regrettably, these same aspects tend to distract our attention from a full, more complete understanding of the traditions that Wright had inherited from the Victorian era, and in turn the amazing influence he had on younger architects in the twentieth century.

June 7, 2016 to June 11, 2016

Ohio Chautauqua – Brimfield

Building on the 19th-century tradition established on the shores of New York’s Chautauqua Lake, Ohio Chautauqua is a five-day community event that combines living history performances, music, education, and audience participation into a one-of-a-kind cultural event the entire community will enjoy.

June 7, 2016 to June 11, 2016

Ohio Chautauqua – Brimfield

Building on the 19th-century tradition established on the shores of New York’s Chautauqua Lake, Ohio Chautauqua is a five-day community event that combines living history performances, music, education, and audience participation into a one-of-a-kind cultural event the entire community will enjoy.

June 7, 2016

"A Scattered People: An American Family Moves West"

A Scattered People: An American Family Moves West by Gerald McFarland. McFarland offers a vivid, personal history of five generations of his family who migrated west over the course of two centuries. Their struggles, successes, and causes (one relative was John Brown) mirror our country's history and dreams.

June 7, 2016

History of the Negro Baseball Leagues

Through a first-person interpretation of Baseball Hall of Famer William “Judy” Johnson, learn the history of the Negro Baseball Leagues prior to Jackie Robinson’s participation in the major leagues of American baseball.

June 6, 2016

White Frame/Black Frame: The Hidden Roots of Racial Realities

Understanding US racial history helps us make sense of current social inequities. ABHM presents a series of public programs and online exhibits exploring the origins of our racially divided society. These programs expand on topics and practices developed in their successful 2014-2015 project "Hidden from History." Programs are based on sociologist Joe Feagin's paradigm of the white frame/black counter-frame, as well as the work of historians like Nell Irvin Painter and educators like Robin DiAngelo.

June 4, 2016

Common Heritage: Preserving Your Family Archives Workshop (Troy University, Troy, AL)

Dana Chandler, presenter, discusses storage supplies, environmental conditions, reducing damage risks, and other solutions to physical preservation and storage of family historical materials.

June 3, 2016

The Roots of Music – Exploring Earth’s Soundscapes

In a compelling presentation that weaves together music and ecology, biologist George Halekas surveys the unique beauty of nature’s soundscape, and explores why Earth is considered a ‘sonic jewel’ and ‘singing planet.’ The vibrant musical heritage of humanity is a wonderful component of this rich soundscape diversity, and the conversation will begin by looking at the emergence of music in ancient hunter gatherer societies from an ecological perspective.

June 1, 2016

The Cold War, The Early Years

Audiences will gather together for a variety of historical enactments, workshops, and informal discussions at the 2016 Oklahoma Chautauqua in Altus. This year's event will focus on the theme "The Cold War, The Early Years," when heightened tensions between the United States and the Soviet Union following World War II led to mutual suspicions, proxy wars, and fears of mass nuclear destruction.

May 2016

May 29, 2016

The Honorable Harvest

The Honorable Harvest is an insightful first-hand account of the Haudenosaunee original instructions given to humankind by the Peacemaker to enjoy the bounty of nature in a sustainable manner; to give thanks to the life we are gathering; and to gather only what is given. In this 90-minute presentation and discussion, Onondaga Clanmother Freida Jacques, asserts that if these concepts were understood by all peoples and nurtured throughout time, many atrocities against the natural world may have been prevented.

May 28, 2016

Telling It Like It Was: Interviews with Arizona Pioneer Women

During the Depression the Federal Writers Project conducted interviews with over 144 women who arrived in the Territory between 1850 and 1890. The women spoke of their long and dangerous journeys, and with their words paint pictures of the hardships and life threatening situations of their frontier existence. Through hard work, dedication, tenacity and humor they conquered and helped make a state. Hear the story of the original Arizona pioneer families including the Udalls, Flakes, Kartchners, Luceros, Romeros, and Jennings.

May 27, 2016

Family Diversity: Past, Present, and Future

What do we envision when we hear “American family?” How is the definition of ‘family’ changing and why? Whether nuclear, step, foster, extended, transnational, adoptive, or informal, American families are more diverse than ever. The structures of families are changing. Families, now more than ever, are influenced by other social and cultural shifts, such as the rise of single parent households, divorce, opting for cohabitation over marriage, and same-sex marriage. Each of these new definitions of family is rooted in broader economic and social changes that are underway in the U.S. and around the world.


 

May 27, 2016

Homecomings and the Humanities: Standing Together with American Veterans

Join the National Endowment for the Humanities for a public presentation on NEH's Standing Together initiative, which seeks to promote the understanding of the military experience and to support returning veterans.

May 26, 2016

Iowans who fought against the Union

Most Iowans think that the state was solidly pro-Union during the Civil War. After all, some 76,500 residents fought for the North. In reality, Iowa Democrats formed a spectrum of dissent. The majority of Democrats opposed abolishing slavery (and yet favored the Union war effort); the minority sympathized with the South. Out of this group, at least 60 Iowa residents served the Confederacy. This talk will focus on four or five of them.

May 24, 2016

The Irish Bridget

Who was the Irish Bridget? What relevance does her story have to the history of Irish immigration to America? Learn the answers to these questions in Margaret Lynch-Brennan's presentation "The Irish Bridget: Irish Immigrant Women in Domestic Service in America, 1840-1930" which is based on her book of the same name. Lynch-Brennan will use photographs and personal letters the Irish Bridgets wrote to one another to give insight into the lives of these young immigrant girls. She will discuss their work life, their social life, the impact they had on Irish-American life, and their contribution to American ethnic history, labor history and women's history.

May 23, 2016

"Leading the Charge: The Ongoing Legacy of Anthony and Douglass"

"Leading the Charge: The Ongoing Legacy of Anthony and Douglass" is a free community symposium that features the speeches of Susan B. Anthony and Frederick Douglass with an interactive panel discussion to follow.

May 22, 2016

The Vermont Civil War Songbook

Singer and researcher Linda Radtke, dressed in period costume and joined by pianist Arthur Zorn, shares songs popular in Vermont during the Civil War as well as letters from Vermonters from the era. From sentimental songs about the girl back home to satirical ballads, Ms. Radtke traces the evolution of tone in Vermont popular song, from patriotic to elegiac as the war continued. The sheet music collection from the Vermont Historical Society is brought to life in this presentation. Radtke will read letters from local soldiers, dedicating songs to those from the area who served.

May 21, 2016

Ancient Wars/Modern Vets

In this ninety-minute illustrated presentation, Peter Meineck offers short readings from contemporary translations of ancient texts to elucidate the connections between the experience of the American veteran community and the ancient Greeks and Romans.

May 21, 2016

Natchez Southern Musical Theatre Conference

The Southern Musical Theatre Conference is a free, public event hosted by the Natchez Opera Festival. This annual event is establish to benefit professionals in the musical theatre industry as well as interested citizens in the state of Mississippi. The conference is deeply seeded in the humanities discipline of Fine Art. The lectures offered highlight the different aspects of theatrical performance, the visual arts considerations made during the performance, musical contributions to the art forms, and the historical contributions of the art form throughout American history

May 21, 2016

Common Heritage: African American Genealogical Research in Alabama (Troy University, Troy, AL)

The Wiregrass Common Heritage Project will host a workshop on African American Genealogical Research in Alabama.

May 21, 2016

Common Heritage: Fishing Heritage Digitizing Day (New Bedford Fishing Heritage Center, New Bedford, MA)

Fishing community members are invited to bring photographs, documents and/or artifacts reflecting their fishing heritage.

May 21, 2016

Common Heritage: Family Treasures (Museum of Chinese in America, New York, NY)

Wonder how to keep your grandma’s teacup in tact? What about your uncle’s family album or sister’s ticket stubs?

May 19, 2016

Writing with Scissors: The American Scrapbook in History

Men and women 150 years ago grappled with information overload by making scrapbooks ��" the ancestors of Google and blogging. From Abraham Lincoln to Susan B. Anthony, African-American janitors to farmwomen, abolitionists to Confederates, people cut out and pasted down their readings. In scrapbooks, 19th-century readers spoke back to the media; they treasured what mattered to them. African Americans and women's rights activists collected, concentrated, and critiqued accounts from a press that they did not control to create "unwritten histories" in books they wrote with scissors. Whether scrapbook makers pasted their clippings into blank books, sermon collections, or the pre-gummed scrapbook that Mark Twain invented, they claimed ownership of their reading. They created their own democratic archives.



 

May 19, 2016

Unlocking the History of an Old House

Just as families have a past, old houses and the land they are built on have histories. This practical lecture is designed to show you how to uncover that past and answer questions such as when was the structure built, who lived in it, how has it changed over time, and what are its stories. The discussion centers on implementing an organized research process, what records are available, where to look for documents, and interpreting the findings. The discussion concludes by presenting suggestions for creating a history of an old house. If you know where to look, you may find the clues to the past.

May 19, 2016

Common Heritage: Sheboygan's Lakefront and Riverfront, A City Defined by Water (Mead Public Library, Sheboygan, WI)

Mead Public Library is sponsoring this program. Beth Dippel, Director of the Sheboygan County Historical Research Center, is the presenter.

May 18, 2016

"Another Turn of the Crank" by Wendell Berry

Book discussion.  “Green” and “sustainable” have become such buzzwords, they have almost lost their meanings. This series explores how different authors and communities understand the multiple definitions and connotations of ecological sustainability and try to make it work in the world.

May 17, 2016

Undocumented Immigrant Youth: Listening to Students and Forging a New Path

New York is home to over 750,000 undocumented immigrants (Pew Hispanic Center, 2014), many of whom live in mixed-status families. This presentation will address state and national policies through the lens of some remarkable undocumented youth, to illustrate the realities, challenges and opportunities they face through high school, college, and beyond.

May 17, 2016

Common Heritage: Franco-American Veterans: Heritage of Service (University of Southern Maine, Portland, ME)

On Tuesday, May 17, at 7pm, Mary Rice DeFosse will give an overview of Franco-American participation in the military, focussing on personal stories from World War I. Ms.

May 14, 2016

Common Heritage: Community History Digitization Project (Clearwater Public Library, Clearwater, FL)

To celebrate its 100th anniversary, the Clearwater Public Library System will digitize historical documents, photographs, and artifacts held by residents of the city.

May 14, 2016

Common Heritage: Digitization Day at the Artesia Library (South Asian American Digital Archive, Philadelphia, PA)

SAADA (the South Asian American Digital Archive) hosts a digitization event for family photographs, letters, newspaper clippings, home movies, and more in Artesia, CA.

May 14, 2016 to September 11, 2016

Impressionism: American Gardens on Canvas

Experience the horticultural inspiration behind American Impressionism.

May 13, 2016

Women as Political Change Agents: From the late 1800's to the present

The conversation will include a parallel examination of male leadership roles and a discussion about what is needed to increase representation of women and women of color in politics today. 


 

May 11, 2016 to September 11, 2016

Coney Island: Visions of an American Dreamland, 1861–2008

Exhibition explores the lure that Coney Island exerted on American culture over a period of 150 years

May 11, 2016

I’ll Fly Away: A Sojourn through Poetry and Spirituals

This interactive presentation covers the sometimes hidden meanings of specific spirituals and poems, including how the art helped people cope as they were transported from another culture. During the discussion, audience members can learn how to connect directly with the tradition of spirituals in their local community.

May 11, 2016

Common Heritage: The Struggle for Equality in an Abolition City (Knox College Library, Galesburg, IL)

A lecture given by historian Matthew Norman will focus on African Americans in Galesburg, Illinois from the mid-nineteenth to the early 20th centuries.

May 10, 2016

Saffron & Honey: Muslims, Jews & Christians in Medieval Spain

What are the commonalities? What are the connections? Tensions and conflicts between Jews, Muslims and Christians appear in the news every day. But what can we learn when we examine the historical threads and unravel stories of connection and collaboration that defy those headlines? Drawing from a story of personal discovery, Davidson-Gómez leads a vivid and vigorous discussion that reveals medieval Spain as a crossroads connecting the Golden Age of Islam, Sephardic Judaism, the Middle Ages, and the Renaissance. Davidson-Gómez shows how Spain, as a channel for the flow of ideas and technology into a Europe that was parched by relative isolation, led advances in science, math, poetry, music, architecture, and politics that would ripple across the world.

May 10, 2016

Common Heritage: Industry Antiques Road Show (New Bedford Fishing Heritage Center, New Bedford, MA)

Join us for a sneak peak at the New Bedford Fishing Heritage Center (opening to the public on June 25th).

May 9, 2016

The 2016 Jefferson Lecture in the Humanities

 Ken Burns, the award-wining documentarian who pioneered a new genre of historical filmmaking, will deliver the 2016 Jefferson Lecture in the Humanities.  Burns will deliver the lecture on May 9 at the John. F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts at 7:30 p.m. The lecture is a free public event and will also stream live online. Burns will talk about race in America, a topic he has illuminated and confronted through his nearly 40 years of directing and producing acclaimed historical documentaries.

May 8, 2016

A Playground for Empire: Historical Perspectives on Cuba and the U.S.A.

The Spanish-American war of 1898 ended Spain’s four-hundred-year rule of Cuba. Cuba became a U.S. protectorate and decades of instability followed, culminating in Batista’s military dictatorship. The 1959 Cuban Revolution is one of the great underdog stories in history, in which a tiny band of young rebels prevailed against all odds. This nationalist revolution quickly fell under the sway of the USSR and Cuba’s previously close ties with the U.S. were abruptly severed.

May 7, 2016

Folk Art & Culture

Folk art is the art produced by self-taught people. Every culture has its share of folk artists, yet art historians often deny folk art its rightful place alongside fine art.

May 7, 2016

Arizona Kicks on Route 66

U.S. Route 66, known as the “Mother Road,” was built in 1926. It ran from Chicago to L. A. During the depression of the 1930s, it became the major path by which people migrated west, seeking work, warm weather and new opportunities. Shore shares the history of Route 66 in Arizona, including the impact it had on the state during its prime, and what happened when the interstate ultimately bypassed some of the towns that drew life from the road.

Marshall Shore, Arizona’s Hip Historian. His passion is uncovering the weird, the wonderful, and the obscure treasures from our past: the semi-forgotten people, places, and events that have made us who we are today.

Phippen Museum


 
May 5, 2016

Human Rights in History

What assumptions do we each hold about human rights? How are these assumptions influenced by history, ethics, politics, and citizenship? What are the challenges to human rights movements and how can the goals of those movements be achieved around the globe? This presentation offers a comprehensive historical context for understanding how the idea of human rights became not only a commitment widely shared by individuals, but also an organizing ethic within and among global nations. 

May 5, 2016

The Cane Ridge Revival of 1801: The Great Revival that Transformed Kentucky

Kentucky author Eddie Price will offer his historical presentation "What I Saw At Cane Ridge: The Great Revival That Transformed Kentucky. The Cane Ridge Revival of 1801 attracted 25,000 people and "transformed Kentucky from a lawless frontier to the birthplace of the Bible Belt," explains a news release from the library, adding that the event is worth examining for its cultural and political impact on the state. Through dramatic interpretation, Price will share testimony from the Cane Ridge Revival, discuss the controversy surrounding what some consider the Second Pentecost and perform old hymns that some folks claimed to "make the flesh tremble."

May 5, 2016

The Life of Elizabeth I

Do great persons influence the times in which they live, or do the times create great people? Perhaps the most influential sovereign England has ever known, Queen Elizabeth I remained an extremely private person throughout her reign, keeping her own counsel and sharing secrets with no one - not even her closest advisers.

May 3, 2016

Rap 101: The Message behind the Music

If all art is political, what are the political, cultural, and societal implications of rap? What does rap convey about the state of society today? Using music as a catalyst for discussion, Rap 101 explores contemporary popular culture, diversity issues, and social justice through the lyrics of popular rap music. Sometimes called modern day poetry, rap is an integral part of modern culture. There is no question that music provides a social commentary. It has been said that if you want to understand what is going on in any community, listen to its music.

May 3, 2016

Native American Stories of Resilience

Radio program -- these narratives from Native Americans who live in the Bismarck-Mandan metropolitan area provide intriguing glimpses into Native American culture, philosophy, and psychology, and reflect challenges they have faced, personal successes, high-point experiences, and dreams for the future.

May 1, 2016 to May 31, 2016

Citizens at Last: The Woman Suffrage Movement in Texas

Created to celebrate the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment, this Humanities Texas traveling exhibition features archival photographs, newspaper clippings, cartoons, cards, and texts detailing the struggle in Texas.

May 1, 2016

The Genealogy of Happiness: From Aristotle to Positive Psychology

What is happiness? Can it be measured? And what is the relationship between happiness and virtue, money, pleasure, relationships, mindfulness, and satisfaction? This program with William Edelglass will begin with an overview of different conceptions of happiness in Western philosophy, religion, and political theory. We will then turn to the numerous claims about what makes us happy based on the results of “the new science of happiness.” We will conclude by reflecting on the findings of positive psychology in the context of the history of the idea of happiness.

April 2016

April 30, 2016

History in your Backyard

“So many stories, all changing by the minute, all swirling and braiding and weaving and spinning and stitching themselves one to another,” writes Brian Doyle in the novel Mink River. These words could just as well apply to LLyn De Danaan’s book Katie Gale: A Coast Salish Woman’s Life on Oyster Bay, about a pioneering Native woman whose extraordinary life swayed wildly between triumphs and tragedies. The book forms the foundation of her Speakers Bureau talk “History in your Backyard,” a discussion of how she discovered this local history and how chance, perseverance, and interpretive storytelling can lead you to find fascinating history in your own community. Her talk shows the people and the artifacts that helped “stitch” Gales story together, and helps guide you in uncovering your own "backyard" tale.

April 30, 2016

Common Heritage: Preservation Workshop: Sharing Your Family History in the 21st Century (Oyster Bay Historical Society, Oyster Bay, NY)

Participants in the workshop will learn best practices for creating a digital archive of their personal and family collections.

April 27, 2016

Privacy in the Digital Age

Is privacy dead? What are our privacy rights? Is it possible to protect our online personas? In the age of celebrity culture and the rapid growth of online communities, personal privacy is under threat. Recent allegations of the U.S. government tracking, reading, and sharing email communications have reignited the debate over privacy and security. How we cope with this new environment determines the meaning of ‘private citizen’ in a digital culture.

April 25, 2016

Book Discussion: The English Patient by Michael Ondaatje

Established in 1968, England's Booker Prize is awarded annually to a citizen of the U.K., the Commonwealth, Ireland, Pakistan, or South Africa who has written the year's best novel according to a panel of critics, writers, and academics.

April 25, 2016

White Frame/Black Frame: The Hidden Roots of Racial Realities

Programs are based on sociologist Joe Feagin's paradigm of the white frame/black counter-frame, as well as the work of historians like Nell Irvin Painter and educators like Robin DiAngelo.

April 23, 2016

Common Heritage: Amache Digitization Day (Sonoma State University, Rohnert Park, CA)

The Anthropological Studies Center at Sonoma State University is launching the Amache Digitization Project.

April 22, 2016

Latino Americans: 500 Years of History and Culture Latin American and Spanish Film Festival

"Latino Americans: 50 Years of History and Culture" is an eight-month series of public events, which aims to give a Fox Cities audience, particularly its Hispanic/Latino population, an opportunity to examine, discuss, and celebrate the historical and cultural impact of Latino Americans.

April 21, 2016

Common Heritage: Queens Memory (Museum of Chinese in America, New York, NY)

MOCA and Queens Library present Living Memory: The Culture and Heritage of Chinese New Yorkers.

April 21, 2016

Common Heritage: Sheboygan, Its First Fifty Years (Mead Public Library, Sheboygan WI)

Mead Public Library hosts the Sheboygan History series, presented by Beth Dippel, Directory of the Sheboygan County Historical Research Center.

April 20, 2016

Journey to the West in Wisconsin

"Journey to the West" is a Chinese novel published in the 16th century. The novel is an extended account of the legendary pilgrimage of the Tang dynasty Buddhist monk Xuanzang who traveled to the "Western Regions" to obtain sacred texts and returned after many trials and much suffering. The book is the selected feature for the UW-Madison Center for the Humanities's annual program that deeply explores a classic humanities world text.

April 19, 2016

Political Incivility and Polarization in America

Does political incivility threaten American democracy? Is there a correlation between political incivility and productivity? Dr. Cornell Clayton leads a lively discussion about some of the connections and what they mean. He charts the changes over the last 30 years. He challenges assumptions about the relationship between civility and democratic participation. He explores factors that contribute to political polarization.

April 19, 2016

Common Heritage: Living Memory: Screening of Lucky with Danielle Chang (Museum of Chinese in America, New York, NY)

MOCA and Queens Library present Living Memory: The Culture and Heritage of Chinese New Yorkers.

April 18, 2016 to May 30, 2015

People's Lives: A Photographic Celebration of the Human Spirit

People’s Lives: A Celebration of the Human Spirit takes us down unfamiliar paths to rest stops, markets, workshops, restaurants, and private homes in locales that most of us may never visit. People’s Lives turns its viewers into world travelers whenever they pause to take in a picture.

April 16, 2016

Common Heritage: Spotlight on North Texas (University of North Texas, Denton, TX)

The University of North Texas Libraries and Texas Archive of the Moving Image are collaborating to save Denton County's motion picture history.

April 16, 2016

Common Heritage: Preserving Community Collections: The Oyster Bay Historical Society Documents a Congregation's Cultural Heritage (Oyster Bay Historical Society, Oyster Bay, NY)

The Oyster Bay Historical Society hosts a day-long event to digitize the cultural heritage collections of the Hood African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church.

April 14, 2016

Reading Home: Letters from Iraq and Afghanistan

This panel discussion will address the experience of receiving mail from the home front while participating in combat operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. Dr. Kristin G. Kelly of the English Department at the University of North Georgia-Gainesville will moderate the discussion with veterans of the long wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

April 13, 2016

Merton, Meditation, and More: Buddhism in the West

Buddhism is well-established in the US, among Buddhists and others, such as Catholic monk and author Thomas Merton, who engaged in Buddhism without conversion. Middlebury College religion professor Elizabeth Morrison considers what has emerged from the West’s encounter with Buddhism.

April 13, 2016

Let's Talk Presidential Elections: Looking Back-Historical Portrayal Program-"Mudslinging, Muckraking and Apple Pie: Presidential Campaign, the Great American Pastime"

The New Berlin Public Library has selected four books to discuss, all of which are related to past presidential elections and issues. Two are nonfiction books, one is a historical portrayal program, and the fourth is a lecture and discussion of the documentary film "Primary." Discussions will be facilitated by humanities experts and will make connections with relevant Wisconsin issues and history.

April 12, 2016 to May 10, 2014

Rural Texas Women at Work, 1930–1960

Drawn from files of the Texas Agricultural Extension Service archives at Texas A&M University, this Humanities Texas traveling exhibition uses photographs and explanatory texts to convey a sense of the lives of rural Texas women, helpful programs of the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Extension Service, and the changes that swept across rural Texas in the Great Depression and World War II.

April 11, 2016

Reconstructing Curriculum: Classroom/Teaching

Unconscious prejudice can subtly influence our attitudes and behaviors. It inhibits our ability to authentically connect with students and can impede our effectiveness as educators. In these important sessions, you’ll develop a profound awareness of your own unconscious bias and help your students’ hidden stories be brought to light.

April 10, 2016

Common Heritage: Antique Speak (Montgomery Museum and Lewis Miller Regional Art Center, Christiansburg, VA)

Antique Speak is an informational presentation about recognizing and preserving family and community heirlooms.

April 9, 2016

The Triple Nickle: Black Paratroopers in Washington State during World War II

What is Operation Firefly? It was May of 1945, when an elite unit made up of some of the Army’s best trained paratroopers were assigned to a remote airstrip in Oregon as part of a highly classified mission known as Operation Firefly. This first all-black paratrooper unit’s mission and service involving Washington state made quiet history and is all but forgotten.

Oak Harbor Library
1000 SE Regatta Drive
Oak Harbor

April 6, 2016 to May 25, 2015

New Spain: The Frontiers of Faith

New Spain: The Frontiers of Faith presents fascimilies of rare archival documents, paintings, and engravings from early printed books to illuminate the first two centuries of Spanish involvement in Mexico and the Southwest.

April 5, 2016

Western Montana - "Reflections West"

Western Montana - "Reflections West" literary radio program.

April 2, 2016

The Seven Tongues of Flame: Ireland’s Easter Rebellion of 1916

How can musicians and poets achieve military goals? During the five centuries that Ireland was controlled by the British Empire, numerous military rebellions were attempted – often failing and resulting in great bloodshed. The Easter Rebellion of 1916 was much different. This time poets, singers and writers led the effort to symbolically liberate Dublin on a significant and symbolic Christian holiday of rebirth. Their efforts inflamed the passions of the Irish people, sparking a five-year struggle that ultimately resulted in Ireland achieving independence in 1921. In this inspirational presentation, musician and historian Hank Cramer will share how visionary poets achieved a goal that no military commander before them had been able to accomplish. Their victory was later commemorated in the popular ballad, “The Foggy Dew.”

April 1, 2016

Vermont Reads: Readers Theater

Participate or just listen to this dramatic group reading based on events as they unfolded in 1914-1916 on Shackleton's expedition to Antarctica. Each participant will take on the part of one of the men who set out on the expedition aboard the Endurance.

April 1, 2016 to April 30, 2016

Border Studies

The Texas-Mexico border is more than a line between two countries. It is a realm unto itself with a culture of its own, shaped by the millions who choose to live and work there. The border is a cradle of hope—and anxiety—for the well-being of both Mexico and the United States. Border Studies features images by eight gifted photographers and maps showing historical relocations of the border, highlighting the vitality of places, people, and patterns of culture along the Texas-Mexico border.

March 2016

March 31, 2016

Shakespeare and Political Philosophy

A movie discussion on Richard II for adult and high school audiences.

March 29, 2016

For the Love of Words: Poetry, Prose and the Creative Writing Process

Twyla M. Hansen, Nebraska's State Poet -- Creative writing is a process that thrives on practice. This writing workshop focuses on the creative process for both poetry and short prose. Twyla will use readings of her own and others writing, along with guided writing exercises, to create an interactive and supportive workshop.

March 29, 2016

Should we teach Shakespeare in the 21st century? A Professional Development Workshop for Teachers

Presenters:  Dr. Kay Sato, Director of Hutton House Lectures, LIU Post, Dr. John Lutz, English Dept. LIU Post, and Dr. Lynne Manouvrier, Director of Gifted and Talented Program, School of Education, LIU Post.

March 28, 2016

South Asian American Women: Rupturing the “Third World Woman” and the Meanings of “Arranged Marriage”

This presentation explores one of the spaces of cathexis in which South Asian American women demonstrate the flexibility of cultural identity, both in its grounding in a specific political economy and its responsiveness to situational factors that allow individuals and groups to make cultural choices, including marriage.

March 27, 2016

Chekhov Play "The Three Sisters"

This is one of five reading and lectures produced by Wisconsin Rapids Community Theatre, each featuring a play by Anton Chekov. The series provides historical, social, political, and critical information on the times, life, and work of the Russian author who transformed dramatic literature.

March 26, 2016

Women Voted in New York Before Columbus

Imagine that women have the right to choose all political representatives, removing from office anyone who doesn't make wise decisions for the future. Living in a world free from violence against them, women will not allow a man to hold office if he has violated a woman. Economically independent, they have the final say in matters of war and peace and the absolute right to their own bodies. This is not a dream. Haudenosaunee (traditional Iroquois) women have had this authority and more -- since long before Christopher Columbus came to these shores.

March 24, 2016

Journey of Hope: The Irish in New York

From the 18th century onwards, dramatic numbers of Irish citizens emigrated to the U.S., often to escape religious persecution and economic hardship. They left the comfort and support of family, friends, and loved ones to arrive in an America that often regarded the Irish as incompatible with American ideals.

March 22, 2016

Ditch of Dreams: The Cross Florida Barge Canal & the Struggle for Florida’s Future

Based on the award-winning book, this presentation examines the long & convoluted history of the attempt to cross the Florida peninsula by cutting a waterway from the Atlantic to the Gulf of Mexico. It looks at the Ocklawaha River in the 19th century and the first attempt to cut a ship canal in the 1930s as part of a New Deal work project. It then moves to the 1960s and the controversy over the building of a barge canal along the path of the failed ship canal. It focuses on the environmental movement organized by Marjorie Carr which eventually stopped the canal before it was completed. Finally, it looks at the process of turning the canal into the Marjorie Harris Carr Cross Florida Greenway and the continuing controversy over whether the Kirkpatrick Dam on the Ocklawaha River should be removed.

March 20, 2016

Climate Change and Cultural Resource Panel

Flagler College in St. Augustine is hosting a series of lectures from March until July 2016 on the impact of climate change on cultural heritage sites and coastal communities.

March 19, 2016

"Nothin' But Nets: The Legacy of Commercial Fishing in Port Washington"

The Port Washington Historical Society is 'giving this history back to the people of Port Washington' by showcasing the lives of the men, women, and children who contributed to this important history and tell their stories in the larger context of Wisconsin's proud history of working culture.

March 19, 2016

Common Heritage: State of the Nation (Seneca Nation of Indians, Salamanca, NY)

Seneca Nation community heritage materials digitization event.

March 19, 2016

Common Heritage: Parramore History Harvest (University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL)

Share Stories, Photos, and Memories of Everyday Life In Parramore

March 18, 2016

Spanish Colonial Foodways

Food is more than the stuff of life; it is an important part of our heritage and culture that defines us as a people. How do we know what we know about food in colonial Florida? Cathy Parker demonstrates for her audience how information from the written historical record, together with evidence from the archaeological record, has answered this question time after time – giving us a more complete picture, for example, of early life in la Florida. She shows that careful comparison of archaeological evidence – in the form of bones, shells, and burned seeds; with appropriate documentary evidence – in the form of letters, inventories, requisitions, and church records – is very much like solving a mystery or a puzzle.

March 17, 2016

"Calling All Poets"

“Calling All Poets” is an exploration of the sense of place in the works of Iowa poets in the hope that we can all recognize the value of our particular place in the world and share it through writing and reading.

March 15, 2016

The Biblical Windows of St. Stephan Church, Mainz, Germany

This lecture on the windows was first suggested by the parish priest, Klaus Mayer. The windows were designed by Chagall for the apse of the church in 1973 as a sign of love, peace, hope and reconciliation for France and Germany, and for Christians and Jews. Use of digital images illustrates each section of the windows. The lecture contains a detailed analysis of the artwork as it coincides with Chagall’s passion for the Bible.

March 14, 2016 to April 15, 2016

Voces Americanas: Latino Literature in the United States

A celebratory survey of works by Latinos in the past thirty years, this Humanities Texas traveling exhibition presents images of authors, books, movie stills, public presentations, and illustrations. It is based on an original exhibition at the University of Houston Library that documented a quarter century of Hispanic publishing in the United States.

March 12, 2016

Our Stories, Ourselves

The Highlands Museum of the Arts (MOTA), which is part of the Highlands Art League, is hosting the photography exhibit of Carlton Ward, Jr. “Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition and Speaker Series” in March 2016. HAL is using this exhibit as a catalyst to add an oral programming component and help make the arts and humanities accessible to an undeserved community in South Central Florida.

March 11, 2016

"Roosters" a play by Milcha Sanchez-Scott

Reno Little Theater presents Roosters, a play that combines a realistic study of family dynamics and a grittty examination of Mexican-American culture.

March 10, 2016

Gallery Talk with Bill Berry- Collector of Racist Memorabilia

This exhibition invites viewers to confront how everyday objects support and perpetuate racism.

March 9, 2016

American Dreamer: Life and Times of Henry Wallace

In this one-act play based on the award-winning book of the same name by Senator John C. Culver and John Hyde, actor Tom Milligan portrays Henry A. Wallace, the agricultural innovator and founder of Pioneer Hi-Bred seed corn company who became US Secretary of Agriculture and later Vice President under Franklin Roosevelt. Admired by many and later branded as a Socialist during his controversial 1948 campaign for the presidency, Wallace always held out a vision for the future.

March 8, 2016

Mapping Granville Memories: A Community Storytelling Workshop

Buildings, street corners, schools, churches, parks, and trees all can be places that get woven into the fabric of daily routine and imbued with personal and public memories. Unfortunately, such places sometimes become taken for granted. If that happens, memories fade, places become endangered, and the genius and spirit of the place suffers. How can we retrieve and share memories about local places before they are lost?

March 7, 2016

Hollywood in the Heartland

Celebrate Iowa’s legacy with the silver screen throughout history.  See how Iowa has been portrayed on-screen in films like State Fair, The Music Man, Cold Turkey, Field of Dreams, The Bridges of Madison County, and others you may not have seen.  Meet the people who have made an impression on-screen and behind the scenes like John Wayne, Donna Reed and Jean Seberg, leading up to recent film stars like Tom Arnold, Ashton Kutcher, Brandon Routh and more.

March 6, 2016

[art]ifact: where history meets art

"[art]ifact: where history meets art" is an exhibit that showcases locally made historical artifacts from the La Crosse County Historical Society's collection alongside new original artwork inspired by these objects and their stories.

March 5, 2016

Reno Chamber Orchestra: Pre-Concert Talk and Concert featuring pianist Derek Han

A pre-concert talk will begin at 6:45 p.m. and end at 7:10 p.m. Moderated by RCO Associate Executive Director Chris Morrison and featuring Music Director Theodore Kuchar and the concert’s guest artist, the conversation is non-technical, designed for a general audience, and typically includes a question-and-answer segment for audience participation. The talk and program notes provide information on the music to be performed, the composers, and the historical and cultural background of the music.

March 4, 2016

Texas Writers

This Humanities Texas traveling exhibition surveys the vitality and breadth of creative writing in Texas from the mid-twentieth century to the turn of the twenty-first century. It provides an overview of the literary accomplishments of Texas writers in a series of panels featuring portraits of authors, books, workplaces, narrative settings, and evocative quotations.

March 3, 2016

Shakespeare, The First Folio, and the Birth of Modern Literature

The publication of Mr. William Shakespeare's Comedies, Histories, and Tragedies, commonly known as the Shakespeare First Folio in 1623 was one of the most remarkable events in literary history. At a time in England when some intellectuals looked down on vernacular drama, it confirmed Shakespeare's position as the central figure of the Western tradition and began a process that would make him the most famous and important writer in the world today.

March 2, 2016 to March 4, 2016

Oxford Conference for the Book Returns for 23rd Year

The 2016 Oxford Conference for the Book will be the 23nd annual event to celebrate books, reading, and writing, while also examining the practical concerns on which the literary arts and the humanities depend, including the process of finding publication, writing methods, and the state of publishing.

March 1, 2016

America's History, People and Culture on Postage Stamps

Bob Ferguson by using a large-screen TV, Ferguson displays high-resolution images of postage stamps commemorating the Civil War, the World Wars, Korea, and Vietnam. Featured in each period are military heroes of various ethnic backgrounds; future presidents, actors and sports legends who served; organizations created by and for veterans; and memorials to honor the dead. He also presents stamps that showcase the history of the American flag and other patriotic symbols and ideas.

March 1, 2016 to March 31, 2016

The Golden Cage

Through photographs and intimate interviews, this exhibit strives to create a revealing portrait of dairy farmers and their Mexican employees and offers a glimpse into their interdependent lives, exploring who they are and what they hope for.

February 2016

February 28, 2016

The Power of Story: A Conversation about the Death Penalty

Why is the issue of capital punishment so divisive? Are Americans aware of the complexities of the issue? Capital punishment, more than any other public issue, has given rise to considerable differences of opinion in U.S. society. When a moratorium on executions in Washington state was announced in February 2014 by Governor Jay Inslee, it sparked a national debate about capital punishment.

February 28, 2016

Islam 101: Perceptions, Misconceptions, and Context for the 21st Century

What does it mean to be Muslim in a modern world? What if much of what we believe about Islam is incomplete or simply wrong? For more than 1.3 billion people across the world and many people in Washington state, Islam is not only their religion but also a way of life. Led by scholar David Fenner, this presentation focuses on Islam and the many aspects that form the substance of a rich culture, traditions, and a way of life.

February 27, 2016

Empire of Dreams (1880-1942)

Widespread immigration to the US from Latin countries begins � first with a small group from Cuba, then a larger one from Mexico See the film and participate in a scholar-led discussion that explores the Mexican laborers that arrived in Dodge City with the railroad..

February 23, 2016

Family Diversity: Past, Present, and Future

What do we envision when we hear “American family?” How is the definition of ‘family’ changing and why? Whether nuclear, step, foster, extended, transnational, adoptive, or informal, American families are more diverse than ever. The structures of families are changing. Families, now more than ever, are influenced by other social and cultural shifts, such as the rise of single parent households, divorce, opting for cohabitation over marriage, and same-sex marriage. Each of these new definitions of family is rooted in broader economic and social changes that are underway in the U.S. and around the world.

February 22, 2016 to March 22, 2016

Shakespeare

William Shakespeare is the quintessential subject for a humanities program. Born into a culture formed by the great humanists of the Renaissance, he peopled the stage with characters that embody both the glory and riddle of being human. Shakespeare draws primarily from print resources of the Harry Ransom Center and production photographs of the Department of Theater and Dance at The University of Texas at Austin.

February 20, 2016

Foreigners in Their Own Land (1565-1880)

One hundred years after Columbus' arrival in the Caribbean, Spanish Conquistadors and Priests push into North America in search of gold and to spread Catholicism. See the film and participate in a scholar-led discussion that explores Coronado's expedition through the area of Dodge City.

February 20, 2016

Meet Buffalo Bill

William F. Cody reflects on his life as express messenger, teamster, buffalo hunter, scout, actor, showman and builder of the West through a series of true-life adventures–from Bill’s perspective, of course.

February 17, 2016

Sorting Out Race

The Kansas Humanities Council is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization governed by a Board of Directors. Individual and corporate contributions, funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities, and funding from the State of Kansas supports our work.

February 15, 2016

The Past is Present: A Community Conversation About Racial Identity and Stereotyping

An examination of thrift stores in American society and their role in preserving the pop culture that emerged among the mass consumerism of the 20th century. Find out how stereotypes are adopted and propagated through consumerism, as seen in items found in thrift stores.

February 10, 2016

I’ll Fly Away: A Sojourn through Poetry and Spirituals

What connections, what traditions could help people cope with being forcibly transported from one continent to another? The literary and artistic forms of spirituals and poetry not only tied communities together socially and artistically during slavery, but also continue to enrich the multicultural fabric of our state today through the work of contemporary African-American poets, musicians and artists. Award-winning poet, performer and distinguished scholar Gloria Burgess explores the rich, beautiful heritage of spirituals and poetry from the African-American tradition in a spirited sojourn through words and music.

February 8, 2016 to March 4, 2016

Texas Writers

This Humanities Texas traveling exhibition surveys the vitality and breadth of creative writing in Texas from the mid-twentieth century to the turn of the twenty-first century.

February 8, 2016

Writers Growing Up Black in Kansas

Langston Hughes, Gordon Parks, and Frank Marshall Davis were all shaped by life in Kansas, a land full of uncertainty and contradictions for African Americans. Each of these writers developed his remarkable literary talents and learned how to succeed against the odds.

February 7, 2016

White Out? The Future of Racial Diversity in Oregon

Although census data show Oregon’s population becoming more racially diverse, the state remains one of the whitest in the nation. Many Oregonians value racial diversity and the dimension and depth it adds to our lives, yet we remain largely isolated from one another and have yet to fulfill the vision of a racially integrated society. Willamette University professor Emily Drew will lead participants in a conversation about the challenges to creating racially diverse, inclusive communities despite the accomplishments since the civil rights era.

February 5, 2016

Promise in a New Land: Migrating and Settling in Nebraska

Cherrie Beam-Callaway Beam-Clarke, as Mariah Monahan, with Irish brogue and period costume, depicts a Nebraska settler between 1845 and 1870. Based on historical fact, this is a first-person Chautauqua-style presentation. Through a spellbinding rendition, viewers are transported in time to sail the ocean, ride the wagon trail, feel the loneliness and fight prairie fires. Laugh and cry with stories of successful crops, dancing, hard work, grasshoppers, losing loved ones and becoming an American.

February 4, 2016

Life after War

When does a war end? Does it ever? Many returning soldiers bring wars back with them, and these wars can reach beyond the battlefield or firefight, infiltrating the very thing that defines comfort and safety: home. The trials of homecoming are vast and complex, often resonating with tales of Odysseus’ journey back to Ithaca from the Trojan War. Photographer Jim Lommasson has collected oral histories from returning soldiers and documented their struggles at home.

February 1, 2016 to February 29, 2016

WATER: Congressional Representation to Protect a Precious Resource

This free, interactive exhibit portrays the challenges of water management and conservation in Oklahoma and examines the Congressional policy-making process. The exhibit features educational items on the effects of national policies on Oklahoma's water resources and information about how to engage with the state's policy makers.


 

February 1, 2016 to February 29, 2016

Africa in the Americas: Slavery in Spanish and Portuguese Realms

This Humanities Texas traveling exhibition explores the lives of Africans during the first three centuries of the American enterprise, with particular emphasis on how the slave trade created the prosperity of the New World and stamped the evolving society with indelible aspects of African culture.

February 1, 2016 to February 29, 2016

Behold the People: R. C. Hickman’s Photographs of Black Dallas, 1949–1961

R. C. Hickman was a Dallas photographer whose thousands of images produced from 1949 to 1961 document aspects of life in an African American community in Texas. His photographs depict a community largely invisible to white Americans—thoroughly a part of mainstream America by virtue of accomplishment and lifestyle but excluded from it because of race. This

January 2016

January 30, 2016

Women as Political Change Agents: From the late 1800's to the present

What sparked decisions by Washington state women in the 19th and 20th centuries to buck societal norms and laws to pursue political leadership roles? What fueled their confidence and abilities to push for change in attitudes and practices associated with women's roles? In this thought-provoking presentation, Jeanne Kohl-Welles engages with the audience to examine and understand what and who have played parts in the development and influence of women's leadership roles, historically and in modern times.

January 28, 2016

Moved and Seconded: Town Meeting in New Hampshire

Drawing on research from her book, Moved and Seconded: Town Meeting in New Hampshire, the Present, the Past, and the Future, Rebecca Rule regales audiences with stories of the rituals, traditions and history of town meeting, including the perennial characters, the literature, the humor, and the wisdom of this uniquely New England institution.

January 28, 2016

Poor Houses and Town Farms: The Hard Row for Paupers

From its earliest settlements New Hampshire has struggled with issues surrounding the treatment of its poor. The early Northeastern colonies followed the lead of England's 1601 Poor Law, which imposed compulsory taxes for maintenance of the poor but made no distinction between the "vagrant, vicious poor" and the helpless, and honest poor. This confusion persisted for generations and led directly to establishment in most of the state's towns of alms houses and poor farms and, later, county institutions which would collectively come to form a dark chapter in New Hampshire history.

January 26, 2016

The Jack Tales, North Carolina Heritage Tales (North Carolina Storytelling Traditions)

This presentation traces plot origins to various European countries and relates how modern-day Jack tales came to be is part of the process of telling stories forward.

January 24, 2016

ICA Forum: On Sexuality and Black Mountain College

"Leap Before You Look: Black Mountain College 1933–1957" delves into the legacy of Black Mountain College, a small, experimental school in North Carolina whose influence on art still has profound impact today.

January 24, 2016

Defending Your Voice: Teaching Soldiers How to Tell Their Stories

For the past year, author Shawn Wong, along with a team of teachers in the Red Badge Project, has been teaching veterans at Joint Base Lewis-McChord how to construct the stories of their lives in writing. Through the project, soldiers are able to translate and articulate their lives away from home, their experiences and their traumas to themselves, their families and a wider audience.

January 22, 2016

Playing for Empowerment: Mill Town Baseball During the Depression Era

Baseball was a game that everyone could either play or watch as they sought power/empowerment: mill owners sought enthusiastic workers and loyal mill town citizens, players sought self-esteem and personal glory, and fans pursued excitement and group identity. Mill town baseball was much more than a game; it gave real meaning to life.

January 21, 2016

We Dig History! Educator Open House

 "We Dig History!" invites participants to learn how to excavate in our mock dig boxes and explore Utah's diverse railroad history by uncovering and researching a variety of artifacts.


 



 

January 21, 2016

Poetry & Discussion with Eric McHenry, Poet Laureate of Kansas

The Poet Laureate of Kansas promotes the humanities as a public resource for all Kansans with readings and discussions about poetry in communities across the state.

Eric McHenry of Lawrence is the 2015-2017 Poet Laureate of Kansas. A nationally known poet and associate professor of English at Washburn University in Topeka, his work has been featured in publications such as Poetry International, Slate, Yale Review, and Topeka magazine, among many others.

January 16, 2016

"Shakespeare's First Folio"

Shakespeare scholars and OU School of Drama professors Alissa Mortimer and Tom Orr will perform and discuss excerpts from Shakespeare's works, along with students from the School of Drama.

January 14, 2016

That Reminds Me of a Story

Stories speak to us of community. They hold our history and reflect our identity.

January 13, 2016

Religion and Human Rights: Allies or Enemies?

The state of Washington has been at the forefront of the civil rights debate recently with the legalization of marijuana, physician aided dying, and the recognition of same-sex marriage. This presentation explores the complex and confusing dynamics that exist between religion and human rights in the context of a rapidly changing society.

January 11, 2016

General Robert E. Lee: The Autumn of His Life

 “Robert E Lee: The Autumn of His Life” will take the audience on a personal journey with Lee, a man of character and spiritual dedication, as he took his place in American culture and history, a place where he was afforded the opportunity to address his passion of nurturing the reconciliation and growth of others.

January 9, 2016

What Happened to the Lost Colony?

The Lost Colony is one of the great North Carolina mysteries. History professor Dr. David LaVere’s research shows that when the English colonists who were left on Roanoke in 1587 disappeared, they tried to leave clues to their whereabouts. Though John Smith and others would look for them, the Lost Colonists were never seen again by Europeans.

January 8, 2016

Discovering New England Stone Walls

Why are we so fascinated with stone walls? Kevin Gardner, author of The Granite Kiss, explains how and why New England came to acquire its thousands of miles of stone walls, the ways in which they and other dry stone structures were built, how their styles emerged and changed over time and their significance to the famous New England landscape.

January 5, 2016

Margaret Bourke-White, America's Eyes

Letters and tender WWII-era V-mails found at Syracuse University form the basis for this living history program.

January 2, 2016 to January 24, 2016

Three Centuries of Christmas Daytime Tours at Webb-Deane-Stevens Museum

See in fascinating detail how Christmas in Connecticut evolved over 300 years at the Webb-Deane-Stevens (WDS) Museum. Armloads of greenery and native plants, authentic decorations from days of yore, and clever food-styling tricks bring holidays past to life during “Three Centuries of Christmas” tours.

January 1, 2016 to January 3, 2016

Lantern Light Tours – Mystic

Set on Christmas Eve in 1876, this play unfolds through five scenes in exhibits around the Museum’s 19th-century maritime village. Visitors of all ages will enjoy seasonal delights that include a horse-drawn carriage ride, a spirited holiday dance, and the beautiful glow of lanterns that light the way.

January 1, 2016 to March 31, 2016

Tune in to the Beehive Archive

Tune in to the Beehive Archive, a two-minute look at some of the most pivotal—and peculiar—events in Utah's history. Catch the show on Utah Public Radio (upr.org) during Friday’s Access Utah, Saturday’s Weekend Edition, or Tuesday’s morning news.


 



 

December 2015

December 17, 2015

Defending Your Voice: Teaching Soldiers How to Tell Their Stories

For the past year, author Shawn Wong, along with a team of teachers in the Red Badge Project, has been teaching veterans at Joint Base Lewis-McChord how to construct the stories of their lives in writing. Through the project, soldiers are able to translate and articulate their lives away from home, their experiences and their traumas to themselves, their families and a wider audience. Whether the narrative voice on the page is in the first person non-fiction voice of the soldier/writer or a surrogate fictional voice, the goal is the same – to be heard and understood. Wong will discuss what he has learned from this program and how communities and soldiers might learn to share, hear and understand the stories of our veterans.

December 17, 2015

Water World: Canoes, Canals, and the Meaning of Water in Ancient Florida

Dugout canoes hewn from massive logs of pine and cypress, canoe canals designed and dug by hand, and indigenous canoe trails and routes along Florida’s coast and through the interior marshes and swamps provide some clues about the significance of water in the ancient world. Archaeologists, however, have been slow to embrace the centrality of water in ancient Florida, where it served as a conduit for communication and exchange and as a source of food, but also as an organizing principle that underlies aspects of social, political, and religious spheres.

December 16, 2015

A Visit With Queen Victoria

Using Queen Victoria's diary and letters, this program reveals the personal details of a powerful yet humane woman, who took seriously her role as monarch in a time of great expansion. She and her husband, Albert, set an example of high moral character and dedication, a novelty in the royal house after generations of scandal.

December 15, 2015 to March 13, 2015

People's Lives: A Photographic Celebration of the Human Spirit

People’s Lives turns its viewers into world travelers whenever they pause to take in a picture.

December 14, 2015

History in your Backyard

Treaty disputes, internment camps, immigration, and destruction of natural habitats- in your backyard! These are just a few of the global events that have touched relatively small and protected Oyster Bay since the mid 18th century. LLyn De Danaan delights in unearthing the sometimes surprising histories of the people who have occupied Oyster Bay. In this interactive presentation she shares her methods and findings, and the value of such work. She talks about Native Americans, Japanese Americans, and European Americans who have lived and worked on Oyster Bay and who have each helped to develop not only its shellfish industry, but also its living history.

December 12, 2015

US Slave Song Project

Join Jim Thomas,president of of US Slave Song Project for a session on the history and interpretation of slave songs. He will highlight the brilliance of the enslaved and the importance of these songs with his distinct and incredible baritone voice.

December 11, 2015

The Roots of Music – Exploring Earth’s Soundscapes

In a compelling presentation that weaves together music and ecology, biologist George Halekas surveys the unique beauty of nature’s soundscape, and explores why Earth is considered a ‘sonic jewel’ and ‘singing planet.’ The vibrant musical heritage of humanity is a wonderful component of this rich soundscape diversity, and the conversation will begin by looking at the emergence of music in ancient hunter gatherer societies from an ecological perspective.

December 10, 2015

Defeating Racism Today: What does it Take?

Does the eradication of racist laws really combat institutionalized racism? How does subtle and sometimes hidden institutionalized racism affect the citizens, economy, and future of Washington state? Abram talks about the history of racism, and how it affects specific groups in our society today. She explores how the painful experiences of Jim Crow laws and slavery might ultimately support the pride and achievements of contemporary generations of African Americans.

December 10, 2015

"On This Spot Once Stood..." Remembering the Architectural Heritage of New Hampshire

Maggie Stier showcases some of the celebrated buildings that New Hampshire has lost, and explores how and why we remember and commemorate those losses. Her program will draw from historical and contemporary photographs, maps, and other historical records to explore the significance of these structures, explain their eventual fate, and analyze popular responses to the loss. Particular attention will be devoted to places where a building was memorialized in some way.

December 8, 2015

How Much Inequality Is Acceptable?

Inequality seems a natural consequence of rewarding excellence and innovation in a capitalist economy. But the level of inequality changes with the times. A number of prominent economists have recently suggested that we, in America, are now living with the largest income gap in the history of the world.

December 7, 2015 to January 18, 2016

Forgotten Gateway: Coming to America Through Galveston Island

Traveling exhibition presented in collaboration with the Bullock Texas State History Museum, explores the Port of Galveston's role in the story of 19th and 20th century immigration to the United States and considers universal themes of immigration including leaving home, encountering danger, confronting discrimination, and navigating bureaucracy.

December 6, 2015

The Muslim Experience in Baltimore

The City of Baltimore faced a period of unprecedented unrest last spring following the death of Freddie Gray. What role can the museum play in the contemporary conversation about race and diversity? This panel discussion, moderated by Homayra Ziad, scholar of Islam at the Institute for Christian & Jewish Studies, opens an important conversation about the intersection of race and the public discourse on Islam and Muslims.

December 4, 2015

Medical History, Digital Humanities, and Data Analysis: Exploring the Impact of the Russian Flu 1889-1890

Faculty members and students from Virginia Tech will present the preliminary results of their research from the “Tracking the Russian Flu in U.S. and German Medical and Popular Reports, 1889-1893” project funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities-German Research Foundation Bilateral Digital Humanities Program. 

December 3, 2015

Eye in the Sky: The Story of the Corona Spy Satellites

A reading/discussion presentation by Professor Branden Little (WSU) on the book, "Eye in the Sky: The Story of The Corona Spy Satellites" by Dwayne A. Day. Presenting the full story of the CORONA spy satellites' origins, Eye in the Sky explores the Cold War technology and far-reaching effects of the satellites on foreign policy and national security.

December 2, 2015

Northwest Mixtape

The Pacific Northwest has a relationship with hip hop culture that is complex and, on occasion, commercially exceptional. Its influences have quietly and broadly affected language, fashion, art, and local life in ways that are not always recognized by mainstream audiences. In this conversation, journalist and author Donnell Alexander takes a look at the secrets behind hip hop in the Pacific Northwest.

December 2, 2015

From Saving to Serving

Many of us try to make a positive difference in the world through our work and volunteering, and we often find that this can be difficult. The language of helping reflects this difficulty. Charity sounds admirable to some and offensive to others. Service can be bland, saving can be paternalistic, and social entrepreneurship can feel corporate.

December 1, 2015 to December 2, 2015

Openlab Workshop Unconference

Free and open to the public, the Unconference and Ignite talks will provide a forum to share insights and perspectives on the Openlab Concept and help frame the discussions of the formal planning workshop that will conclude the event on December 2, 2015.  This planning workshop will bring together participants invited from a cross-section of organizations, scholars, GLAM and humanities practitioners, and members of the public to consider the tactics, goals, and underlying vision of the Openlab Concept.

November 2015

November 24, 2015

Defending Your Voice: Teaching Soldiers How to Tell Their Stories

For the past year, author Shawn Wong, along with a team of teachers in the Red Badge Project, has been teaching veterans at Joint Base Lewis-McChord how to construct the stories of their lives in writing. Through the project, soldiers are able to translate and articulate their lives away from home, their experiences and their traumas to themselves, their families and a wider audience.

November 24, 2015

The Pilgrims

The challenges the Pilgrims faced in making new lives for themselves still resonate almost 400 years later: the tensions of faith and freedom in American society, the separation of Church and State, and cultural encounters resulting from immigration.

November 21, 2015

Global Events That Touched Florida: From the Great Depression to the Cold War

This program explores Floridians’ memories of U-boat attacks, German POWs, the Cold War, the Cuban Missile Crisis, and more, using excerpts from Janie Gould’s Floridays radio shows first heard on public radio.

November 19, 2015

How Oceanographic Effects Influenced the Prehistoric Colonization of Islands: A Caribbean-Pacific Comparison

This presentation considers questions of resource acquisition and population movements as mediated by oceanographic and wind conditions.

November 18, 2015

12,000 Years Ago in the Granite State

Robert Goodby discusses how the real depth of Native history was revealed when an archaeological study prior to construction of the new Keene Middle School discovered traces of four structures dating to the end of the Ice Age. Undisturbed for 12,000 years, the site revealed information about the economy, gender roles, and household organization of the Granite State's very first inhabitants, as well as evidence of social networks that extended for hundreds of miles across northern New England.

November 16, 2015

Theodore Roosevelt: Wilderness Warrior in Washington State

Through a presentation that combines music, anthropology and history, Scott Woodward explores how the formation of all of these refuges, parks and monuments resulted from the particular leadership methods used by President Roosevelt and his personal mission to preserve natural resources. Woodward also discusses Theodore Roosevelt’s signature approach to getting things done: combining politics with citizenship that crossed all political lines and built legacies for future generations, as well as establishing the sense of place we have today.

November 14, 2015

Hominy Indians Presentation

As part of the Guymon Public Library's hosting of the Smithsonian Hometown Teams traveling exhibition, Dr. Sara Richter will speak about the Hominy Indians professional football team that traveled the region and played during the 1920s and 30s.

November 12, 2015

Civilians of Gettysburg, 1863

Most students of the Battle of Gettysburg, and most of the books (past and present) about the battle, address the military events leading up to and taking place on July 1-3, 1863. This living history program presents another point of view. Ginny Gage portrays Sarah Broadhead, a wife and mother at the time of the battle living with her husband and young daughter. Lew Gage portrays Charlie McCurdy and presents a young boy's perspective. Both roles are based on original diaries and reminiscences of civilians living in the town of Gettysburg in the summer and fall of 1863.

November 10, 2015

Our National Thanksgiving: With Thanks to President Lincoln and Mrs. Hale

Sarah Josepha Hale, a Newport, NH native, tells the story of her 30 year effort to have Thanksgiving declared a national holiday. President Abraham Lincoln enters at the end of her tale to read his 1863 Thanksgiving proclamation. Sharon Wood portrays Hale and Steve Wood portrays Lincoln in a living history presentation following background about their characters and the times

November 10, 2015

"Prejudice and Pride" (1965-1980): a screening and discussion

“Prejudice and Pride (1965-1980)” is the fifth episode in the PBS documentary series, Latino Americans. It examines the efforts of Latino farmworkers and labor organizers, artists, educators, and political activists to combat discrimination, strengthen community identity, and attain greater visibility and agency in American society in the mid- to late twentieth century. The episode addresses the farmworker movement led by César Chavez and Dolores Huerta, the socially influential plays, poetry, and films of Luis Valdez and Corky Gonzalez, and Sal Castro’s pursuit of equality in public education, among other topics.

November 9, 2015 to March 20, 2016

The Dust Bowl

In the 1930s, photographers working for the Farm Security Administration (FSA) captured unforgettable images of human fortitude and despair in the face of calamity. Nebraska photographer Bill Ganzel set out in the late 1970s to find and re-photograph Dust Bowl survivors for a book and exhibition.

November 8, 2015 to December 8, 2015

The Way Things Were: Texas Settlers and Their Buildings, 1860s–1930s

This Humanities Texas traveling exhibition looks at early Texas buildings for information about settlers' visions of community and progress and their accommodation to the physical demands and economic realities of everyday life.

November 8, 2015

The Seven Tongues of Flame: Ireland’s Easter Rebellion of 1916

In this inspirational presentation, musician and historian Hank Cramer will share how visionary poets achieved a goal that no military commander before them had been able to accomplish. Their victory was later commemorated in the popular ballad, “The Foggy Dew.”

November 6, 2015

The Battle of Britain thru Japanese Eyes: Attachés on the Ground in London and the Continent

Presented by Theodore F. Cook, Jr.: William Paterson University of New Jersey / NYMAS Board

November 5, 2015 to December 3, 2015

The Treasures of Tutankhamun

This exhibition, based on the major traveling display, has been reconstructed to tell the story of Tutankhamun as it was told through Carter’s discovery and the original traveling exhibition.

November 5, 2015

Data, Democracy and the Human Story: A Conversation with Members of Deep Lab

In the first installment of our series, “Data, Democracy and the Human Story,” we examined how data science is shedding new light on “human” topics, like romantic attraction and racial bias. Now, join us as we discuss the ways that the arts and humanities might provide a way to negotiate some of the critical contemporary issues raised by technology.

In the second installment of this series, we’ll talk with three members of Deep Lab, a collaborative group of cyberfeminist researchers, artists, writers, engineers and cultural producers engaged in ongoing critical assessments of contemporary digital culture.

November 1, 2015 to December 1, 2015

Vocies Americanas: Latino Literature in the United States

A celebratory survey of works by Latinos in the past thirty years, this Humanities Texas traveling exhibition presents images of authors, books, movie stills, public presentations, and illustrations.

October 2015

October 31, 2015

Wisconsin Women Making History: Film Screening of Emma Toft: One with Nature

This film explores the work of the environmental pioneer from Door County who was willing to fight for the land and the respect of plants and animals. A discussion after the film screening will be facilitated by Sam Watson, Associate Professor of Art at UW Sheboygan.

October 28, 2015

Indian Country Remembers: Treaty Rights in 1950s and 1960s

Indian Country Remembers: Treaty Rights in 1950s and 1960s -  Wisconsin-Public Presentation and Fourm at the McIntyre Library, University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire.

October 27, 2015 to October 30, 2015

Risking Everything: An exhibition about Freedom Summer

The Chippewa Valley museum is hosting the traveling exhibit, "Risking Everything: A Freedom Summer Exhibit for Students," from the Wisconsin Historical Society. This exhibit explores the civil rights era by focusing on the 1964 Freedom Summer project.

October 26, 2015 to November 20, 2015

Theodore Roosevelt

This Humanities Texas traveling exhibition focuses on the ebullient personality and character of our twenty-sixth President, as reflected through his many different kinds of writing. It features color and sepia-toned photographs with concise texts.

October 21, 2015

"Prophet's Prey" Film Screening

Join us for a special screening of the film adaptation of Sam Brower's critically-acclaimed book Prophet's Prey at Peery's Egyptian Theater. Brower will be present for a Q&A following the screening.

October 19, 2015 to November 13, 2015

Citizens at Last: The Woman Suffrage Movement in Texas

Created to celebrate the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment, this Humanities Texas traveling exhibition features archival photographs, newspaper clippings, cartoons, cards, and texts detailing the struggle in Texas.

October 16, 2015 to October 17, 2015

War’s End: Victory over Germany and Japan, 1945

Produced & moderated by Robert Miller with presentations by Nigel Hamilton, Sally Paine, Mark Stoler (on George C. Marshall), and Jason McDonald.

October 15, 2015 to November 25, 2015

Benjamin Franklin: In Search of a Better World

This Humanities Texas traveling exhibition looks at the remarkable life and achievements of one of America’s most beloved personalities. Besides serving his country as a skillful diplomat and negotiator, Benjamin Franklin was a scientist, inventor, entrepreneur, humorist and philanthropist whose wisdom and wit continue to inspire and entertain us more than three hundred years after his birth

October 14, 2015

Jackalopes, Hodags, and Other Larger than Life Myths from the American Road

This presentation examines the origins of the legends, the people who crafted them, and how they reflect the regions they inhabit.

October 13, 2015

Poets Shannan Ballam & Star Coulbrooke Visit Weber State University

Poets Shanan Ballam and Star Coulbrooke will share and discuss their work at Weber State University.

October 12, 2015 to November 20, 2015

Images of Valor: U.S. Latinos and Latinas of World War II

The exhibition focuses on individual stories that reveal larger themes such as citizenship and civil rights and features excerpts from the more than five hundred oral history interviews that were part of the project.

October 9, 2015

The Cause of All Nations: An International History of the American Civil War

NYMAS free evening event:  The Cause of All Nations: An International History of the American Civil War.  Presented by Don H. Doyle, University of South Carolina.

October 6, 2015

Lincoln on the Civil War

"Lincoln on the Civil War" is a four-part reading and discussion series facilitated by W. Averell Bauder.

October 6, 2015

"The Great Divide"

The Great Divide is a new Havey Productions documentary film presented by Colorado Humanities, Colorado Foundation for Water Education, Colorado Heritage Agritourism, and Poudre Heritage Alliance.

October 6, 2015

Working Warriors: Military Life Beyond Combat

About 75% of military work is considered non-combat. These roles rarely make the headlines, but are vital to every military operation.

October 5, 2015

Poetry & Discussion with Eric McHenry, Poet Laureate of Kansas

Eric McHenry of Lawrence is the 2015-2017 Poet Laureate of Kansas. A nationally known poet and associate professor of English at Washburn University in Topeka, his work has been featured in publications such as Poetry International, Slate, Yale Review, and Topeka magazine, among many others.

October 3, 2015

Stone Fort Days: The Burning of the Valleys

Stone Fort Days features Revolutionary War living history programs and re-enactments all weekend, including military activities, 18th century children's toys and games, a Colonial doctor, a Seneca warrior program, camp tours, historical vignettes, period music, and of course a battle each afternoon.

October 2, 2015 to November 13, 2015

Forgotten Gateway: Coming to America Through Galveston Island

Forgotten Gateway: Coming to America Through Galveston Island, a new Humanities Texas traveling exhibition presented in collaboration with the Bullock Texas State History Museum, explores the Port of Galveston's role in the story of 19th and 20th century immigration to the United States and considers universal themes of immigration including leaving home, encountering danger, confronting discrimination, and navigating bureaucracy.

October 1, 2015 to December 28, 2015

The Road to the Promised Land: Martin Luther King Jr. and the Civil Rights Movement

Featuring photographs, facsimiles of landmark documents, and quotations by Dr. King and others engaged in the struggle for civil rights, this Humanities Texas traveling exhibition surveys the Civil Rights Movement from the emergence of Martin Luther King Jr. in the Montgomery bus boycott of 1955 through the 1990s.

September 2015

September 30, 2015

Vermont’s Flood of 1927: A New Look

The flood is remembered as the greatest natural disaster ever to strike Vermont, and stories of loss, tragedy, and heroism abound. Yet it is far more than an episode restricted to the history of a single state. An examination of the flood and reconstruction helps shed light on important facets of our national history, and helps us understand better America’s passage through the often anxious and difficult years of the 1920s.

September 27, 2015

19th Century Landmark Treasures of Noho

On this one-hour walking tour of the Noho Historic District, promenaders will see 11 buildings designated as individual New York City landmarks. The tour begins at the 1832 Merchant’s House and within a few blocks traces 100 years of social, economic and technological changes in New York during the 19th century, from a residential enclave for the wealthy merchant families of Old New York to a center of manufacturing and busy cultural center.

September 26, 2015

WAR WORDS WISDOM: Drum-Taps

Civil War Soldier Stories

September 25, 2015

Wages of Destruction: The Making and Breaking of the Nazi War Economy

The Wages of Destruction was one of the winners of the Wolfson History Prize for 2006.

September 25, 2015 to September 26, 2015

50th Anniversary of NEH-- Democracy and the Humanities

Two-day Symposium at Loyola University Maryland commemorating the 50th anniversary of the founding of the National Endowment for the Humanities

September 24, 2015

Life in a Jar: The Irena Sendler Project

Dr. Jack Mayer tells the story of Irena Sendler, a holocaust hero who rescued 2,500 children from the Warsaw ghetto. Sendler’s story remained unknown after the war—until three Kansas teens uncovered a reference to her heroism 60 years later. They helped transform her story into a National History Day play called Life in a Jar, finally bringing recognition to Sendler’s heroism and helping to open dialogue about the Holocaust in Poland.

September 20, 2015

Inventive Vermonters: A Sampling of Farm Tools and Implements

Paul Wood presents a sampling of farm tools, implements, and artifacts invented or produced in Vermont, examining their use, uniqueness of design, and the often fascinating stories of the inventors themselves.

September 19, 2015

Mexican Poetry Reading

In conjunction with the exhibition, "FRIDA KAHLO: Art, Garden, Life," Rachel Eliza Griffiths, a poet and photographer who teaches creative writing at Sarah Lawrence College, reads from the works of 20th-century Mexican poet Octavio Paz (1914 -1998) and other poet contemporaries of Kahlo.

September 19, 2015

Atlanta's Living History: Uncovering Atlanta's History Through Archival Research"

As part of Emory University's 100 year celebration of its move to Atlanta, the Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library (MARBL) will host a panel of humanities scholars who will explore MARBL materials and their relationship to the surrounding area through an exercise in archival research.

September 18, 2015

Pennsylvania German Music, Dance and Instruments

Through dance, songs and stories, audiences explore the traditions of Pennsylvania German music and dance. Dressed in authentic attire, Keith Brintzenhoff begins with a brief history of these rich traditions. He also performs and explains the roles that the guitar, harmonica, mountain dulcimer, banjo and autoharp play in Pennsylvania German music.

September 17, 2015

Poets and Their Craft Lecture Series

Poet Diana Whitney presents her lecture, “‘The Dense Fragrance that Rises from the Earth': Nature and Desire in Lyric Poetry,” which will include selections of her poetry.

September 16, 2015

Exhibition opening: Armed By Design

Join us for the opening of Armed By Design: Posters and Publications of Cuba's Organization of Solidarity of the Peoples of Africa, Asia, and Latin America (OSPAAAL).  Interference Archive presents Armed By Design: Posters and Publications of Cuba's Organization of Solidarity of the Peoples of Africa, Asia, and Latin America (OSPAAAL), a public exhibition and event series which features the graphic design production of OSPAAAL, the Organization in Solidarity with the Peoples of Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Based in Havana, OSPAAAL produced nearly 500 posters, magazines, and books from the late 1960s through the present.

September 14, 2015 to October 18, 2015

Images of Valor: U.S. Latinos and Latinas of World War II

This Humanities Texas traveling exhibition provides a historical overview of U.S. Latino participation in World War II and features historical photographs from the U.S. Latino & Latina WWII Oral History Project archives and contemporary photographs of men and women of the WWII generation by photojournalist Valentino Mauricio

September 14, 2015 to September 15, 2015

Walt Disney on American Experience

Walt Disney was uniquely adept at art as well as commerce, a master filmmaker who harnessed the power of technology and storytelling.

September 12, 2015 to October 15, 2015

The Reel Past

A series of entertaining programming for adults dedicated to educating attendees on Coweta County contributions to the art and entertainment industry with special focus on locally produced and filmed movies and television series and local artists.

September 11, 2015 to October 9, 2015

Destination México

This exhibition also examines the influence of political and economic conditions in Mexico and the United States and technological developments in tourism.

September 9, 2015

The Old Country Fiddler: Charles Ross Taggart, Vermont’s Traveling Entertainer

Having grown up in Topsham, Vermont, Charles Ross Taggart went on to a forty-year career performing in countless stage shows across the country, including the famous Red Path Chautauqua circuit. A fiddler, piano player, humorist, singer, and ventriloquist, he made at least 25 recordings with the Victor, Edison, and Columbia companies, and appeared in a talking movie picture four years before Al Jolson starred in The Jazz Singer.

September 8, 2015

The ZAP! 7 The Artists Who Took Over Maryland Parkway

"Egaging the neighborhoods and people that flow North and South along Maryland Parkway is a tremendous way to highlight local artists and bring their work out to the street for better awareness. We hope residents and visitors alike will view the works on display at Nevada Humanities and then venture down Maryland Parkway and all the ZAP! locations across the valley to discover more about this part of Nevada,” commented Christina Barr, Executive Director, Nevada Humanities.

September 7, 2015

Spark! Poetry Writing & Recitation Competition for High-School Students

Clark County high school students in grades 9 – 12 are invited to submit original poems for the Vegas Valley Book Festival 2015 Spark! Poetry Writing & Recitation Competition by Sept. 30, which is modeled after the national Poetry Out Loud competition and the Scholastic Writing competition.  High school students will have the opportunity to recite their own poetry during the Vegas Valley Book Festival on Saturday, Oct. 17. The first-place prize is $300. The second-place winner will receive $200, and the third-place prize is $100.  Students will be asked to present three original poems to be judged by a panel consisting of poets, authors, educators and other community members. Panelists will use scoring guidelines to assign numerical values to the evaluation criteria.

September 5, 2015 to September 6, 2015

The Story of Akwesasne: The Little Boy

Skilled in traditional oration, Mohawk elder Kay Olan will weave a complex history of Akwesasne reservation and its ever changing relationship with the US and Canada using Salli Benedict's Little Boy Coat as a metaphor. Symbols, culture change, and resiliency are key components of the story.

September 4, 2015 to September 25, 2015

Always Lost: A Meditation on War

Featuring Pulitzer Prize-winning combat photographs and literary meditations on the nature of war, Always Lost: A  Meditation on War brings home the personal and collective costs of war and honors those who made the ultimate sacrifice in Iraq and Afghanistan

September 3, 2015

Conversation Project: Why Aren’t There More Black People in Oregon?

 Oregon has a history not only of Black exclusion and discrimination, but also of a vibrant Black culture that helped sustain many communities throughout the state—a history that is not taught in schools. Author and educator Walidah Imarisha will lead participants through a timeline of Black history in Oregon that speaks to the history of race, identity, and power in this state and the nation. Participants will discuss how history, politics, and culture have shaped—and will continue to shape—the landscape not only for Black Oregonians but all Oregonians.

September 2, 2015

World in Your Library

World in Your Library is a free, library-based foreign policy speakers series that provides communities with the opportunity to explore current issues with experts.

September 1, 2015

Early Maine Photography: 1840 to 1870

Within a year of the invention of the daguerreotype in 1839, photography found its way to Maine, creating a lasting record of the appearance of the state’s people and places during the mid-nineteenth century.

August 2015

August 31, 2015

Hollywood in the Heartland

Celebrate Iowa’s legacy with the silver screen throughout history. See how Iowa has been portrayed on-screen in films like State Fair, The Music Man, Cold Turkey, Field of Dreams, The Bridges of Madison County, and others you may not have seen. Meet the people who have made an impression on-screen and behind the scenes like John Wayne, Donna Reed and Jean Seberg, leading up to recent film stars like Tom Arnold, Ashton Kutcher, Brandon Routh and more.  From the Orpheum Theatre in Sioux City to the Adler in Davenport, uncover the beauty of historic theaters and their role in communities across the state.

August 30, 2015

Grass Between the Rails

The program celebrates Iowa’s railroad heritage with a unique blend of stories and original folk songs about the development of railroads in Iowa. The subjects cover events of national importance such as the race across Iowa to connect with the transcontinental railroad to the West, and local history, including the poor service offered by the “Slow Norwegian.”

August 29, 2015

Westward Ho, Nevada, a talk by Frank X. Mullen

Frank X. Mullen is the Reno-based newspaperman known for his hard-hitting investigative pieces. He broke stories about rural cancer clusters, dangerous Nevada doctors, and toxic clouds generated by burning munitions in Lassen County. In addition, he is the author of The Donner Party Chronicles: A Day-By-Day Account of a Doomed Wagon Train. Frank teaches journalism classes at the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR); lectures about the history of the Silver State; and regularly performs in the Nevada Humanities Chautauqua and other Chautauqua venues nationwide.

August 27, 2015

The Anti-Slavery Movement in Black and White

Explore the history behind the anti-slavery movement in northern Illinois and examine the criteria historians use to separate fact from fiction.

August 25, 2015

Roebling in Wartime

History exhibit exploring the role played by the John A. Roebling’s Sons Company as a defense contractor during World Wars I and II and the effect of those conflicts on the company and its workforce.

August 24, 2015

Mapping the Merrimack: A Frontier Adventure into Uncharted Territory 1630-1725

The program describes some of the early survey techniques and cartography and is illustrated with the maps of the period.

August 24, 2015 to October 15, 2015

Bonfire of Liberties: Censorship of the Humanities

Censorship has been practiced for nearly as long as there have been materials to censor. The Bonfire of Liberties gives an overview of censorship in its various guises over time. Furthermore, it examines the struggle between those who want to censor difficult, controversial, and revolutionary material from sensitive viewers and those who want to protect the freedoms of all people to read, view, and think for themselves.

August 22, 2015

Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein: Anatomy of a Masterpiece

Over the two centuries since its publication, the work has also served as a vivid allegory in debates about technology, slavery, and universal suffrage. Led by scholar Lance Rhoades, this multi-media presentation considers how Shelley addressed some of mankind’s greatest concerns with a creation that took on a life of its own.

August 20, 2015

The Ripple Effect: How Saving a River Revitalized a Community

This exhibit tells the story of the Reedy River and Lake Conestee, Greenville’s own environmental crisis and the community’s response to it. Decades of industrial waste polluted the Reedy’s water and created hazardous conditions in Lake Conestee. Through the diligence of local citizens and the Environmental Protection Agency, the Reedy was cleaned up, Lake Conestee transformed from a chemical wasteland to a nature preserve, and Falls Park created to become the pride and icon of Greenville.

August 19, 2015

“Family Stories: How and Why to Remember & Tell Them”

 Workshop to help people gather information about their family histories.

August 17, 2015

Spark! Poetry Writing & Recitation Competition for High-School Students

Entries open June 1 for Spark! Poetry Writing & Recitation Competition for High-School Students, with a submission deadline of September 30, 2015.  Clark County high school students in grades 9 – 12 are invited to submit original poems for the Vegas Valley Book Festival 2015 Spark!

August 16, 2015

The Triple Nickel: Black Paratroopers in Washington State during World War II

Trained by U.S. Forest Service Rangers, members of the 555 jumped on some 36 forest fires as first responders, including the 1945 Mt. Baker fire. In the process of helping to save our forest, they gained military fame as the first all-black “Airborne Infantry Firefighters.”  

August 15, 2015

Teddy Roosevelt's Nobel Prize: New Hampshire and the Portsmouth Peace Treaty

Teddy Roosevelt chose Portsmouth to be the site of the 1905 peace treaty negotiations between Russian and Japanese delegations to end the Russo-Japanese war. Charles Doleac's program first focuses on Roosevelt's multi-track diplomacy that included other world powers, the Russian and Japanese delegations, the US Navy, and New Hampshire hosts in 30 days of negotiations that resulted in the Portsmouth Peace Treaty and earned Roosevelt the 1906 Nobel Peace Prize.

August 15, 2015

Royals and Regalia: Inside the Palaces of Nigeria’s Monarchs

“Royals and Regalia: Inside the Palaces of Nigeria’s Monarchs,” collects photos from George Osodi’s ongoing project, which has taken him into the palaces of more than 20 kings and queens all over the country. The project is intended to show off Nigeria’s history and cultural complexity, and to promote harmony in a country often torn apart by ethnic and religious conflict. Osodi is excited to show this work for the first time in the United States because he thinks the project has special relevance for Nigerians who’ve emigrated abroad and their children, who have never been to their homeland.

August 13, 2015

The Maine Frontier: Through the Lens of Isaac Walton Simpson

The film is centered around a collection of over 1500 photos taken just after the turn-of-the-century by Isaac Simpson: photographer, blacksmith, barber, musician, woodsman, mechanic, and Father of 13. Isaac Simpson, his wife Effie, and their friends and family, exemplify the character, necessities, and unique condition of the turn-of-the-century northern Mainer.

August 11, 2015

The Finest Hours :The True Story Behind the U.S. Coast Guard's Most Daring Sea Rescue

On February 18, 1952, an astonishing maritime event began when a ferocious nor'easter split in half a 500-foot long oil tanker, the Pendleton, approximately one mile off the coast of Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Incredibly, just twenty miles away, a second oil tanker, the Fort Mercer, also split in half. On both tankers men were trapped on the severed bows and sterns, and all four sections were sinking in 60-foot seas. Thus began a life and death drama of survival, heroism, and a series of tragic mistakes.

August 10, 2015

New Hampshire and the American Clipper Ship Era

Glenn Knoblock explores our nation's maritime past with this exciting look at the fastest sailing ships ever built in America. Learn how the clippers evolved, who built them and why, as well as New Hampshire's important role in supplying these unique ships. Though New Hampshire's coastline is only seventeen miles long, the state produced more clippers, all built at Portsmouth, than many other cities, bested only by New York and Boston.

August 9, 2015

A Visit with Abraham Lincoln

Abraham Lincoln, portrayed by Steve Wood, begins this program by recounting his early life and ends with a reading of the "Gettysburg Address."

August 8, 2015

"American Indian Music: Even More than Drums and Flutes," Scott Prinzing

This presentation looks at the history and development of Indian music from the traditional to the contemporary and explores a broad spectrum of American Indian music ranging from blues to folk, country to gospel, and heavy metal to hip-hop. You may be surprised by how many of your favorite musicians are American Indians.

August 7, 2015

Commemorating Genocide: Celebrating Survival

Exhibit on the history of the Armenian Genocide that explores the individual experiences and ethical challenges related to that event.

August 6, 2015

Vanished Veterans - NH's Civil War Monuments and Memorials

From Seabrook to Colebrook, Berlin to Hinsdale, New Hampshire's towns, individuals and veterans organizations erected a fascinating assortment of memorials to The War of the Rebellion. Beginning with obelisks of the 1860s and continuing to re-mastered works of the 21st century, historian George Morrison presents a diverse selection of New Hampshire's commemorations.

August 5, 2015 to September 14, 2015

Changing the Face of Power: Women in the U.S. Senate

Melina Mara began photographing the thirteen women in the U.S. Senate in 2001, continuing as their number grew to fourteen in 2003. Changing the Face of Power: Women in the U.S. Senate, the exhibition based on her work, was created by the Dolph Briscoe Center for American History at The University of Texas at Austin.

August 4, 2015

Industry and Innovation in Bridgton: Products of New England Culture

Programs will run the gamut from formal lectures to guided historical hikes and hands-on activities for families.

August 3, 2015

Old Time Rules Will Prevail: The Fiddle Contest in New Hampshire and New England

 In recent years, the fiddle contest has declined significantly in New England due to cultural changes and financial viability. The greatest legacies of these contests were recordings made during live competition. A sampling of these tunes is played during the presentation, as well as some live fiddling by the presenter, Adam Boyce.

August 3, 2015 to August 29, 2015

Vaquero: Genesis of the Texas Cowboy

In the early 1970s, Bill Wittliff visited a ranch in northern Mexico where the vaqueros still worked cattle in traditional ways. Wittliff photographed the vaqueros as they went about daily chores that had changed little since the first Mexican cowherders learned to work cattle from a horse's back. Wittliff captured a way of life that now exists only in memory and in the photographs included in this exhibition.

August 1, 2015

Inside Russia Today

The fall of Soviet Communism in the early 1990s catapulted Russia into a new social order.

July 2015

July 31, 2015

Building Communities: Mexican American Fast Pitch Softball Leagues

The project is part of "Hometown Teams," a statewide initiative exploring the way sports build and unite communities.

July 30, 2015

Writing War

After more than a decade of war in Afghanistan and Iraq, an impressive cadre of writers has emerged from the ranks of America’s military to put stories of war and homecoming on paper.

July 27, 2015 to September 4, 2015

Benjamin Franklin: In Search of a Better World

This Humanities Texas traveling exhibition looks at the remarkable life and achievements of one of America’s most beloved personalities. Besides serving his country as a skillful diplomat and negotiator, Benjamin Franklin was a scientist, inventor, entrepreneur, humorist and philanthropist whose wisdom and wit continue to inspire and entertain us more than three hundred years after his birth.

July 25, 2015

Zora in the Harlem Renaissance

This program will discuss Zora Neale Hurston in context of the Harlem Renaissance through discussion of: the social, political, economic and cultural factors that produced the Harlem Renaissance.  Harlem Renaissance icons (Duke Ellington, Ella Fitzgerald, and Cab Calloway) will also perform in Jacksonville in the now depleted Ashley Street district.

July 25, 2015

Walt Whitman's Lincoln

In this presentation, esteemed storyteller and actor Brian "Fox" Ellis re-creates one of the lectures that Whitman delivered annually on Lincoln's birthday after his death. These lectures interspersed commentary on the significance of Lincoln's life and work with Whitman's Civil War poems, including "The Artillery Man's Vision," arguably one of the first accounts of post-traumatic stress disorder as experienced by Veterans in American literature.

July 24, 2015

Young Historian Night at the Museum: Hometown Teams

See young adults perform their interpretation of historical figures with a sports connection. The performances are the result of mentored workshops that focus on historical research.

July 23, 2015

Domestic Servants in the Nineteenth Century

Having live-in domestic servants seems like the height of luxury today, but in the nineteenth century, "hired girls" were common in middle-class households in Illinois. In a society without electricity and running water, household chores were onerous, and in the nineteenth century, a wave of immigrants made labor cheap and plentiful. The result was a society that grew increasingly stratified as the century wore on and the social hierarchy became more entrenched. In domestic servant situations, working-class men and women lived and worked side-by-side with their employers yet were considered second-class citizens, often leading to tense relationships.

July 21, 2015

The Harvey Girls' Multicultural Workforce

The Fred Harvey Company not only hired recent immigrants to work in their famous Harvey House restaurants, they actively recruited them. Eventually African American workers became a part of the workforce, and during World War II American Indians and Mexican Americans were hired as well.

July 19, 2015

Roycroft Lecture Series with Timothy P. Schmalz

Timothy Schmalz will be discussing his artistic process and his recent interest and research on the Arts & Crafts Movement and its history.

July 18, 2015

A Closer Perspective: Furthering Access to Native Culture

The Arts Council, in partnership with the Bethel Area Chamber of Commerce, will work to deepen community engagement in an on-going project to authenticate local native culture and provide community access to native arts and culture. A free public lecture/discussion will be at the Bethel Inn to explain the Wabanaki culture.

July 17, 2015

Lewis & Clark & American Indians

While Lewis and Clark were the first Americans to see much of what would become the western United States, those same lands had long been occupied by native peoples.          

Over the course of the expedition, the Corps of Discovery would come into contact with nearly 50 Native American tribes. Quickly, the captains learned how many different definitions there really were for the word “Indian.” The Mandans lived in earth lodges, farmed corn and were amenable to trade with America. The Teton Sioux slept in tepees, hunted buffalo and guarded their territory fiercely against anyone who passed through, whether foreign or Indian. Some tribes had never seen a white or black man before Lewis and Clark. Others spoke bits of English and wore hats and coats they received from European sea captains.

July 16, 2015

Historic Pioneer Trails Through Southwestern Iowa

This presentation on trails of southwestern Iowa covers the explosive years between 1804-1857 for the still relatively new American republic.

July 15, 2015

Robert Frost: The Impossibility of Interpretation

John Ward (Centre and Kenyon Colleges) will lead a presentation on Robert Frost that will provide a true taste of the Maine Humanities Council's programming.

July 14, 2015

The Star-Spangled Banner and the Struggle that Forged Two Nations

The War of 1812 contributed significantly toward defining the identities of the United States and Canada. The many songs composed during the war and its aftermath -- including our own national anthem -- express a broad range of Native American, white American, British, and Canadian perspectives. They demonstrate that perceptions of war and its repercussions can vary widely, depending on one's experiences of them. Skilled guitarist and singer Lee Murdock performs several of these songs and provides commentary about them based on his extensive research.

July 10, 2015

Preservation of the Dress Collection

Learn about a multi-month project to catalog, photograph, label, and preserve the historical society's collection of wedding dresses, Halloween Queen gowns, and early 1900s dresses.

July 9, 2015

Industry and Innovation in Bridgton: Products of New England Culture

Programs will run the gamut from formal lectures to guided historical hikes and hands-on activities for families.

July 7, 2015

Stay On, Stranger - 1876—1962

The story of Alice Lloyd College, a four-year liberal arts work college in pippa Passes, Kentucky.  It was co-founded by the journalist Alice Spencer Geddes Lloyd and June Buchanan in 1923, at first under the name Caney Junior college, as an institution to educate leades for Appalachia locally.

July 6, 2015

Hollywood in the Heartland

Celebrate Iowa’s legacy with the silver screen throughout history.  See how Iowa has been portrayed on-screen in films like State Fair, The Music Man, Cold Turkey, Field of Dreams, The Bridges of Madison County, and others you may not have seen.

July 2, 2015

Let’s Talk About It!

A free, library-based reading and discussion program for people who want to talk with others about what they have read, presented in collaboration with the Maine State Library!

July 2, 2015

Man on the Moon: The Voyages of the Apollo Astronauts

 On the night of July 20, 1969, our world changed forever when Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin walked on the moon. Based on in-depth interviews with twenty-three of the twenty-four moon voyagers, as well as those who struggled to get the program moving.

July 1, 2015 to July 25, 2015

Shakespeare

William Shakespeare is the quintessential subject for a humanities program. Born into a culture formed by the great humanists of the Renaissance, he peopled the stage with characters that embody both the glory and riddle of being human.

July 1, 2015

How We Survive: North Dakota Conversations

Presented by humanities scholars and author-survivors of childhood abuse, "How We Survive" engages multiple disciplines to consider one of life's most pressing questions: how do we survive the struggles we face, as individuals, families, and cultures?

July 1, 2015

Writing My Way Back Home (Written works and mementoes from veterans)

Written works and mementoes from veterans that participated in "Writing My Way Back Home," writers workshops that document the veterans' experience.

June 2015

June 30, 2015

Exhibit: The Griots of Oakland

This multimedia exhibition illuminates the brilliance, beauty, and humanity of African American young men and boys. Positioning them as the storytellers and praise-singers of their communities.

June 30, 2015

1913: Seeds of Conflict

Loeterman’s documentary examines the crumbling of the Ottoman Empire and its effect on the ground to the diverse people of Palestine

June 28, 2015

The Music of Irving Berlin

Learn about great American composer Irving Berlin's career, compositions and importance in shaping American popular thought in the 20th century. This presentation provides extensive musical excerpts to illustrate five periods of Irving Berlin's musical career. Each musical selection is accompanied by discussion of the historical context and cultural climate of the time.

June 27, 2015

Mark Twain: American Icon

Through his characters and stories, Twain single-handedly put American literature on the map. Ernest Hemingway was quoted as saying, "All modern American literature comes from one book by Mark Twain called Huckleberry Finn. American writing comes from that. There was nothing before. There has been nothing as good since." Mark Twain lived many lifetimes in one, traveled much and entertained multitudes with his particular sense of humor. But that humor was borne on the back of great sorrow and many personal tragedies. He was irreverent, irascible, and had a razor-sharp wit. He is an American icon.

June 25, 2015

Hopi Summer

This presentation portrays the lives of the Hopi people during the 1920s and 1930s, prior to the tremendous cultural changes that occurred before World War II.

June 24, 2015

In the Footsteps of Daniel Boone

This presentation tells the life story of Daniel Boone by putting his life on the landscape and taking the audience to some of the 85 sites spread across 11 states where the life of America’s pioneer hero is commemorated with markers, monuments, plaques, statues, historic homes and replica forts.

June 22, 2015 to July 11, 2015

Working Warriors: Military Life Beyond Combat

About 75% of military work is considered non-combat. These roles rarely make the headlines, but are vital to every military operation. Exploring the non-combat roles of military service personnel, including work as beauticians, military police, dentists, mechanics, and photographers, this exhibit showcases an often overlooked but highly relatable side of military life.

June 21, 2015 to June 27, 2015

Appalachian Young Writers' Workshop

The Appalachian Young Writers' Workshop (AYWW) is a seven-day residential writing workshop for rising 10th, 11th, 12th graders, and graduating seniors.

June 20, 2015

A Story of Service Throughout the Years

This event supports "The 1011th -A Story of Service Throughout the Years," a project to collect and preserve the images of veterans who served with the 1011th Quartermaster Company, US Army Reserve, during deployments to Vietnam, Iraq, and Afghanistan.

June 19, 2015 to August 15, 2015

Behold the People: R. C. Hickman’s Photographs of Black Dallas, 1949–1961

R. C. Hickman was a Dallas photographer whose thousands of images produced from 1949 to 1961 document aspects of life in an African American community in Texas. His photographs depict a community largely invisible to white Americans—thoroughly a part of mainstream America by virtue of accomplishment and lifestyle but excluded from it because of race.

June 18, 2015

The Things They Carried Home

Public workshop, led by a preservation consultant, aimed at helping veterans and their families preserve material related to military service.

June 16, 2015

Theodore Roosevelt: Wilderness Warrior in Washington State

How did Roosevelt achieve so much? In 1903, President Theodore Roosevelt made a stop in Washington state as part of a 17-city national tour, inspiring thousands of Washington residents on both sides of the Cascades. The wilderness legacy that ensued from this visit guarantees our sense of place in Washington state today with the formation of national wildlife refuges, national forests and parks, and national monuments.

June 13, 2015

Excess Baggage: Riding the Orphan Train

Excess Baggage: Riding the Orphan Train. Presented by Charlotte M. Endorf.  Endorf traveled more than 8,500 miles, seeking the last surviving riders and descendents to document the real-life stories of the children who rode the Orphan Trains between the years 1854 and 1929. Dressed in period attire, Endorf entertains and educates audiences of all ages about this little known Nebraska history.

June 12, 2015

Aristotle's Email: Friendship in the Cyber Age

In Book VIII of his Nichomachean Ethics, Aristotle categorizes three different types of friendship: friendships of utility, friendships of pleasure, and friendships of the good. The latter, Aristotle states, are the most important, and the rarest. Such friendships of the good require time and intimacy -- to truly know people's finest qualities you must have deep experiences with them, and close connections.

June 11, 2015

Is the Water Glass Half Empty or Half Full? A Balanced Rationale about Dam Removal

Why remove a dam? Is the decision an environmental or economic one? In a state that is rich with water resources, the topic of dam removal has proved to be extremely controversial. With restoration of salmon populations as one well publicized aspect, author and scientist, Dennis Dauble, discusses other important components of the process and the decision of whether to remove a dam. He explores dam removal as both economic and environmental decisions, and also dives into long-term implications.

June 9, 2015

David Thoreson: Personal Adventures and Explorations of the Northwest Passage

David Thoreson tells adventure stories visually, stitching voyages together and along the way go into brief history, photography and landscape, trip planning, ice charts, wildlife, native villages, and changes in the environment contributing to loss of Arctic ice.

June 7, 2015

Trunks and Travel... a 19th Century Journey

The audience is part of the program in this lecture, which brings to life the customs, sights, and sounds of travel in late-19th-century New York State. Exploring the preparations of a wealthy Victorian industrialist and his wife as they get ready to travel, participants learn about transportation modes, rules and etiquette of the road, proper attire, and the era's social expectations. Digital projection enables large-scale presentation of graphics and photos of transportation and travelers.

June 6, 2015

Let’s Celebrate Margaret Walker

In celebration of the 100th anniversary of Margaret Walker's birth in 1915, the Jackson Hinds Library System will present a series of lectures during Walker's Centennial year of 2015 titled "Let's Celebrate Margaret Walker: An African American Woman Author of the 20th Century." The series will focus on the literary and historical importance of Walker, her influence on other African American women, and the lasting value of her works.

June 6, 2015 to September 7, 2015

American Epics: Thomas Hart Benton and Hollywood

Exhibition on the connections between Benton's art and the movies

June 4, 2015

The Music History of French-Canadians, Franco-Americans, Acadians and Cajuns

Lucie Therrien follows the migration of French-Canadians and the evolution of their traditional music: its arrival in North America from France; the music's crossing with Indian culture during the evangelization of Acadia and Quebec; its growth alongside English culture after British colonization; and its expansion from Quebec to New England, as well as from Acadia to Louisiana.

June 3, 2015

The Shia-Sunni Divide in Islam

Former Iranian Ambassador to the UN Mansour Farhang examines the origin and contemporary revival of this 1,300-year-long divide and explores how contemporary challenges facing states and societies in the Middle East exacerbate the animosity.

June 1, 2015 to October 31, 2015

Through Her Lens: Women Photographers of Mid-Coast Maine, 1890 – 1920

This interactive, multi-site, multimedia exhibit at the Penobscot Marine Museum in Searsport will highlight women’s roles in culture through the exploration of the lives and work of four women photographers who lived and photographed in mid-coast Maine at the turn of the 20th century.

May 2015

May 31, 2015

Royals & Regalia: Inside the Palaces of Nigeria’s Monarchs

Royals & Regalia: Inside the Palaces of Nigeria’s Monarchs presents 40 visually stunning portraits from a new series by acclaimed Nigerian photographer George Osodi. Exhibited for the first time in the U.S., these vibrant color photographs feature the regional rulers of modern-day monarchies throughout the country. They provide audiences with a rare and intimate look inside Nigeria’s palaces and throne rooms, capturing the personalities of the rulers, the splendor of their dress, and the details of their settings.

May 30, 2015

Crossing Over: Works by Contemporary American Indian Writers

Let’s Talk About It is a free, library-based reading and discussion program for people who want to talk with others about what they have read, presented in collaboration with the Maine State Library.

May 28, 2015

Civilians of Gettysburg, 1863

Most students of the Battle of Gettysburg, and most of the books (past and present) about the battle, address the military events leading up to and taking place on July 1-3, 1863. This living history program presents another point of view. Ginny Gage portrays Sarah Broadhead, a wife and mother at the time of the battle living with her husband and young daughter.

May 26, 2015

"Muslim Voices"

May 26, 4:00 pm: The Girl in the Tangerine Scarf, by Mohja Kahf
Presented by Children's Librarian Priscilla Wenzel and Dr. Andrew Vassar.

May 22, 2015

Lincoln on the Civil War

"Lincoln on the Civil War" is a four-part reading and discussion series facilitated by John Schmeelk.  During this fourth session, participants will be discussing: Cooper Union Speech, 1860, Speech at Independence Hall 1861, First Anaugural Address, 1861.

May 21, 2015

Samuel D. Burris Speaks - A free African American

Meet a conductor of the Underground Railroad.

May 20, 2015

Lenape Culture: An Introduction to American Indian Life in New Jersey

This lecture presents a variety of authentic artifacts, crafts and clothing to explain Lenape daily life, beliefs, history and creative expression. It also explains the special relationships between the people, the animals and the forest preceding contact with Europeans.

May 17, 2015 to June 13, 2015

Fur, Feathers, and Fidelity: Military Mascots

The Seymour Community Historical Society is hosting a traveling exhibit curated by the Wisconsin Veterans Museum dedicated to military mascots. These animals are a source of pride and morale for troops. .

May 17, 2015 to September 13, 2015

The Red that Colored the World

From Antiquity to today, as symbol and hue, red has risen to the pinnacle of the color spectrum.

May 14, 2015

The Olmsted Historic Landscape Legacy in New Jersey

As early as 1867, Frederick Law Olmsted came to Newark, NJ to select a site for Branch Brook Park, America’s First County Park. Through this lecture you will become more familiar with the Olmsted philosophy of landscape design and the legacy as it exists today throughtout New Jersey.

May 13, 2015

Slanted Eyes: The Asian-American Experience

 For Asian refugees who fled persecution or death, experiences of living in America are vastly different than for immigrants who left their home country for a better life in the U.S. From the racist to the innocuous, issues of culture, ethnicity, and discrimination are consistent and prevalent themes for Asian Americans. In this interactive presentation, psychologist and former broadcast journalist Sam Louie uses spoken word poetry to guide audiences to better understand the depth of cultural issues that confront Asian Americans today.

May 13, 2015

Conversation Project: Understanding Disability

The disability community accounts for 12 percent of the US population and almost 14 percent of the population of Oregon. All Oregonians are influenced by the disability community, whether as individuals with a disability or as family members, friends, or allies of someone with a disability. Join writer and activist Jill Crawford Hurt in an exploration of our experiences and perceptions of this community.

May 13, 2015

1913 Seeds of Conflict

Documentary explores the divergent social forces growing in Palestine before World War I

May 12, 2015

New Hampshire and the American Clipper Ship Era

 Learn also about the exciting voyages these ships made, the cargos they carried, the men and, in a few cases, the women, who sailed them, and why the ships' reign, lasting from 1844-1860, was so short. Whether you're a boating or nautical enthusiast, or simply have an interest in salt-water history, this lecture will fill your sails.

May 11, 2015 to June 1, 2015

The Way Things Were: Texas Settlers and Their Buildings, 1860s–1930s

This Humanities Texas traveling exhibition looks at early Texas buildings for information about settlers' visions of community and progress and their accommodation to the physical demands and economic realities of everyday life.

May 11, 2015 to May 21, 2015

Working Warriors: Military Life Beyond Combat

About 75% of military work is considered non-combat. These roles rarely make the headlines, but are vital to every military operation. Exploring the non-combat roles of military service personnel, including work as beauticians, military police, dentists, mechanics, and photographers, this exhibit showcases an often overlooked but highly relatable side of military life.

May 9, 2015

The Anti-Slavery Movement in Black & White

Explore the history behind the anti-slavery movement in Northern Illinois and examine the criteria historians use to separate fact from fiction.

May 8, 2015 to November 28, 2015

Real Pirates: The Untold Story of the Whydah from Slave ship to Pirate Ship

Discover the Whydah, slave ship turned pirate ship, which sank in U.S. waters in 1717.  Using actual artifacts recovered from the wreckage of the Whydah, this exhibit will reveal the trails and tribulations of pirate life in the 18th century.

May 7, 2015

"Let's Celebrate Margaret Walker: An African American Woman Author of the 20th Century."

The lectures series will focus on the literary and historical importance of Walker, her influence on other African American women, and the lasting value of her works. Each lecture will be led by a scholar and will include discussions of her works.

May 7, 2015

A Walk Back in Time: The Secrets of Cellar Holes

Northern New England is full of reminders of past lives: stone walls, old foundations, a century-old lilac struggling to survive as the forest reclaims a once-sunny dooryard. What forces shaped settlement, and later abandonment, of these places?

May 6, 2015

Defending Your Voice: Teaching Soldiers How to Tell Their Stories

For the past year, author Shawn Wong, along with a team of teachers in the Red Badge Project, has been teaching veterans at Joint Base Lewis-McChord how to construct the stories of their lives in writing. Through the project, soldiers are able to translate and articulate their lives away from home, their experiences and their traumas to themselves, their families and a wider audience.

May 5, 2015

Lucy Bakewell Audubon - Audubon's Leading Lady (1787—1874)

They say well-behaved women rarely make history. Lucy Bakewell Audubon is an exception to that rule. Her proper behavior and strength helped secure the legacy of her husband, John James Audubon (famed naturalist, artist, and author of the larger than-life The Birds of America). Theirs is a story about art, ambition, devotion, deception, resentment, redemption, and above all, love. It’s a fascinating story because it’s so implausible: highly educated and born to wealth and privilege, Lucy not only endured her husband’s eccentricity, but successfully adapted to life on the frontier. Follow the Audubons from their immigration to America in the early 1800s, to their adventures in evolving Louisville, their pioneer days in the wilderness of Henderson, economic depression during the Panic of 1819, and their times of separation when John James explored and sought his fame, while Lucy stayed behind and kept the home fires burning.

May 4, 2015

The Triple Nickel: Black Paratroopers in Washington State during World War II

What is Operation Firefly? It was May of 1945, when an elite unit made up of some of the Army’s best trained paratroopers were assigned to a remote airstrip in Oregon as part of a highly classified mission known as Operation Firefly. This first all-black paratrooper unit’s mission and service involving Washington state made quiet history and is all but forgotten.

May 3, 2015

Walt Whitman's Lincoln

In this presentation, esteemed storyteller and actor Brian "Fox" Ellis re-creates one of the lectures that Whitman delivered annually on Lincoln's birthday after his death. These lectures interspersed commentary on the significance of Lincoln's life and work with Whitman's Civil War poems, including "The Artillery Man's Vision," arguably one of the first accounts of post-traumatic stress disorder as experienced by Veterans in American literature. Mark Twain described one such lecture as the most powerful performance he had ever witnessed in a theater.

May 2, 2015

Adventures in Reading - New Bedford Free Public Library

A humanities-based family reading program with 6 storyteller-led sessions in which children aged 6 to 10 and their parents read and discuss engaging, multicultural picture books.

May 1, 2015

Religion and Human Rights: Allies or Enemies?

This presentation explores the complex and confusing dynamics that exist between religion and human rights in the context of a rapidly changing society.

April 2015

April 30, 2015

Abraham Lincoln: A Study in the Paradox of Greatness

As the 150th anniversary of the Civil War moves into high gear, it seems appropriate to focus on Abraham Lincoln. This presentation explores Lincoln's claim on posterity, which rests not just on his victory in the Civil War, but also on the unique combination of Lincoln's personal qualities, his historical context and the American imagination.

April 29, 2015

Eleanor Roosevelt: Advocate for Universal Human Rights.

In this informal talk, Mrs. Roosevelt, as portrayed by Elena Dodd, recalls her years with the United Nations Human Rights Commission and the drafting of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

April 28, 2015

The Journey to Mollie's War: WACS and World War II

Members of the Women's Army Corps -- WACs -- were the first women other than nurses to serve overseas in World War II. Cyndee Schaffer's mother, Mollie Weinstein Schaffer, was one of them. Drawing upon excerpts from Mollie's letters written home during the war, this presentation provides a romantic, yet frightful, glimpse into the life of a woman in uniform during this crucial time in history.

April 26, 2015

Carson City Symphony Pre-Concert Talk, Flute and Harp

Music Director/Conductor David Bugli and guest soloists Sally Turk, flute, and Michael Langham, harp, will discuss the lives, history, and cultural context of the composers.  The pre-concert talk will include discussion and demonstration of the evolution and mechanics of the flute and harp. The pre-concert conversation is provided free of charge.

April 24, 2015

Antonio Meucci, True Inventor of the Telephone

Antonio Meucci (1808-1889), an Italian immigrant to New York, has been denied his rightful place in history as the true inventor of the telephone. His story is emblematic of the fiercely competitive "Age of Invention" in America (roughly 1870-1910).

April 23, 2015

"Peace Through Understanding: The 1964-65 World's Fair and the Fight for Civil Rights"

This talk is presented in conjunction with Lehman College Art Gallery’s exhibition “The Gee’s Bend Tradition,” which not only highlights the quilts that were an integral part of the Gee’s Bend culture through generations, but also links significant events of the Civil Rights movement to the people of Gee’s Bend, Alabama who were ardent supporters of the movement.

April 22, 2015

The Argentine Pope.

Pope Francis’s emphasis on the poor and marginalized has energized social justice in the Roman Catholic Church. Author Martin Weinstein, professor emeritus at William Paterson University, examines the foundations of the Pope’s philosophy, the history of the church in Latin America, and the rise of liberation theology.

April 21, 2015

Florida Environmental History

This presentation examines the relationship of people to the land throughout Florida history. Starting with Native American settlement, it shows how Florida has shaped human existence in the state and how human have re-shaped the state itself. It focuses on how Floridians have worked to turn water into land and land into water.

April 18, 2015

Walt Whitman's Lincoln

In this presentation, esteemed storyteller and actor Brian "Fox" Ellis re-creates one of the lectures that Whitman delivered annually on Lincoln's birthday after his death. These lectures interspersed commentary on the significance of Lincoln's life and work with Whitman's Civil War poems, including "The Artillery Man's Vision," arguably one of the first accounts of post-traumatic stress disorder as experienced by Veterans in American literature. Mark Twain described one such lecture as the most powerful performance he had ever witnessed in a theater.

April 16, 2015

2015 Nevada Humanities Great Basin Young Chautauqua Program

Young Chautauqua emphasizes scholarship, research, reading, and performing. The program is free and open to all children who are interested in history and performing.

April 16, 2015

Privacy and Personality in the Digital Age

Is privacy dead? What are our privacy rights? Is it possible to protect our online personas? In the age of celebrity culture and the rapid growth of online communities, personal privacy is under threat. Recent allegations of the U.S. government tracking, reading, and sharing email communications have reignited the debate over privacy and security. How we cope with this new environment determines the meaning of ‘private citizen’ in a digital culture.

April 16, 2015

1913: Seeds of Conflict

Documentary explores the divergent social forces growing in Palestine before World War I

April 15, 2015 to May 15, 2015

Citizens at Last: The Woman Suffrage Movement in Texas

Created to celebrate the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment.

April 14, 2015

One Regiment’s Story in the Civil War: The Ninth Vermont, 1862–1865.

Civil War historian Donald Wickman offers listeners tales of the Ninth Vermont, highlighted by the stories of some of the 1,878 Vermonters who comprised it, as it became one of the most traveled regiments in the Civil War.

April 13, 2015

The Iroquois (Haudenosaunee) Influence on Women's Rights

Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Matilda Joslyn Gage, the two major theoreticians of the early women's rights movement, had direct knowledge of the Haudenosaunee, writing about the superior social, political, religious, and economic status of women in the Iroquois nations. Their work for women's rights, Wagner argues, was inspired by the vision they received from the Haudenosaunee of gender balance and harmony.

April 11, 2015

Defeating Racism Today: What does it Take?

Does the eradication of racist laws really combat institutionalized racism? How does subtle and sometimes hidden institutionalized racism affect the citizens, economy, and future of Washington state? Eva Abram talks about the history of racism, and how it affects specific groups in our society today. She explores how the painful experiences of Jim Crow laws and slavery might ultimately support the pride and achievements of contemporary generations of African Americans.

April 8, 2015

In the Good Old Colony Days: Songs of Early America

This program explores the many ways music was part of life in the Colonial and Revolutionary War era.

April 7, 2015

Islam 101: Perceptions, Misconceptions, and Context for the 21st Century

What does it mean to be Muslim in a modern world? What if much of what we believe about Islam is incomplete or simply wrong? For more than 1.3 billion people across the world and many people in Washington state, Islam is not only their religion but also a way of life.  Led by scholar David Fenner, this presentation focuses on Islam and the many aspects that form the substance of a rich culture, traditions, and a way of life. Endeavoring to provide a complete and accurate view of Islam, Fenner creates an open atmosphere and encourages free dialogue specifically to promote greater understanding of Islam, its history and its place in the modern world.

April 7, 2015

Floridians at Work: A History through Images & Words

Dr. Gary Mormino is the scholar in residence at the Florida Humanities Council and professor emeritus of history at the University of South Florida, St. Petersburg. “Floridians at Work: A History through Images & Words” explores the myriad ways and customs of working Floridians.

April 6, 2015

Making Sense of the Civil War

"Making Sense of the Civil War" is a five-part reading and discussion series facilitated by Dr. Cristina Zaccarini of Adelphi University.

April 3, 2015 to May 10, 2015

Madonnas of the Prairie: Depictions of Women in the American West

The exhibit features paintings and sculptures that show these complex portrayals of women and honors the sacrifices of the "Madonnas of the Prairie" who endured the countless hardships of life in the American West.

April 2, 2015

America's Nine First Ladies From New York State

Of America's 46 First Ladies, 9 were born in New York State. This illustrated lecture explores the lives and legacies of these women, each with a different, fascinating tale to tell.

April 1, 2015 to April 30, 2015

PoemCity 2015

PoemCity 2015 celebrates National Poetry Month by showcasing the work of Vermont’s contemporary poets in a walkable anthology.

March 2015

March 30, 2015

The Constance H. Carlson Public Humanities Prize

The Constance H. Carlson Public Humanities Prize honors an individual, institution, or group in recognition of exemplary contributions to public humanities in Maine. In 2015, Donald Soctomah will be the recipient.

March 25, 2015 to March 27, 2015

Oxford Conference for the Book Returns for 22nd Year

The 2015 Oxford Conference for the Book will be the 22nd annual event to celebrate books, reading, and writing, while also examining the practical concerns on which the literary arts and the humanities depend, including the process of finding publication, writing methods, and the state of publishing. The conference convenes fiction and non-fiction writers, journalists, poets, publishers, teachers, students, librarians, and literacy advocates for three days of readings, lectures, panels, workshops, and social events celebrating the written word.

March 24, 2015

Trains Across Iowa

The program explores Iowa's unique position in the construction of the first transcontinental railroad and Iowa's great contribution to railroad safety.

March 22, 2015

"Where Have You Gone Joe Dimaggio," Jackie Robinson, and Hank Greenberg: Ethnic Heroes in Baseball's Melting Pot

As a means of illuminating America's racial and ethnic past, this lecture examines and compares an iconic baseball triumvirate: Jackie Robinson, Joe DiMaggio, and Hank Greenberg. Prior to the sport's travails of recent years, baseball long reigned as the undisputed "national pastime." Then, the microcosm of baseball reflected the main currents of American life and culture. We explore the game's golden age, when it possessed the power to dramatize the imperfections of the nation's melting pot.

March 21, 2015

The African Presence in Spanish Florida: Black Seminoles

African slaves have often risked life and limb to escape southern slavery, but their options for sanctuary were extremely limited. Some fled to the Caribbean, while others fled south and joined forces with another group of freedom-seekers: the Seminoles.

March 20, 2015

Meet Eleanor Roosevelt

This program offers a frank and often humorous look at the struggles and personal fulfillment of a shy young woman who metamorphosed into a strong voice for social justice and universal human rights and was witness to the tumultuous events of her day.

Funded project of the New Hampshire Humanities Council.  The New Hampshire Humanities Council is a state affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

March 19, 2015

From Garden to Table

This PowerPoint presentation is based on a 17th-century Dutch gardening- and cookbook, which features a calendar for gardening activities and a cookbook that explains how to use the fruits and vegetables grown in the garden to best advantage. The 400-year old book with its contemporary theme helps in understanding the kitchen gardens of the early Dutch settlers of the Hudson Valley and gives insight in our colonial diet.

March 19, 2015

The Triple Nickel: Black Paratroopers in Washington State during World War II

What is Operation Firefly? It was May of 1945, when an elite unit made up of some of the Army’s best trained paratroopers were assigned to a remote airstrip in Oregon as part of a highly classified mission known as Operation Firefly. This first all-black paratrooper unit’s mission and service involving Washington state made quiet history and is all but forgotten. In a surprising and insightful presentation, Robert L. “Bob” Bartlett tells the tale of the “555,” paratroopers who, despite being prevented from serving in Europe or realizing some of the same privileges and rights granted white soldiers at home, served with distinction when cross-trained to become “Smokejumpers.”

March 16, 2015 to May 9, 2015

Vaquero: Genesis of the Texas Cowboy

In the early 1970s, Bill Wittliff visited a ranch in northern Mexico where the vaqueros still worked cattle in traditional ways. Wittliff photographed the vaqueros as they went about daily chores that had changed little since the first Mexican cowherders learned to work cattle from a horse's back. Wittliff captured a way of life that now exists only in memory and in the photographs included in this exhibition.

March 14, 2015

The Underground Railroad in Quilts?

The Underground Railroad, the secret paths traveled by African Americans who escaped slavery in the South, is well documented by historians. Far more elusive is evidence that slaves used quilts as signals to guide their way to freedom. This hands-on talk and demonstration engages in the ongoing debate between historians and the public - did quilts guide escapes? Authentic 19th century quilts and modern reproductions are used to explore some of the ways in which women may have stitched their politics, history and mythology into quilt designs.

March 12, 2015

George Washington Spied Here: Spies and Spying in the American Revolutionary War (1775 - 1783)

The Father of our country was also our first Intelligence Chief. The program is illustrated with images of the main places and dramatis personae of this unusual network of patriot secret agents and couriers.

March 11, 2015

On Hemingway: Three Views

This chautauqua program by Betty Jean Steinshouer examines the author of machismo, from a woman’s point of view.

March 10, 2015

The Spoon River Anthology by Edgar Lee Masters

2015 marks the 100th anniversary of the publication of the Spoon River Anthology by Edgar Lee Masters. To this day, no other literary work from Illinois has had an impact more radical than that of the Spoon River Anthology. In Masters' 243 thinly veiled epitaph-poems, people from all walks of life come forward from their graves and share compelling stories of their hopes, dreams, tragedies, and joys, not to mention their advice and warnings to those still living.

March 9, 2015

The Ripple Effect: How Saving a River Revitalized a Community

This exhibit tells the story of the Reedy River and Lake Conestee, Greenville’s own environmental crisis and the community’s response to it. Decades of industrial waste polluted the Reedy’s water and created hazardous conditions in Lake Conestee.

March 7, 2015

New England's Colonial Meetinghouses and their Impact on American Society

Using photographs of the few surviving "mint condition" meetinghouses as illustrations, Paul Wainwright tells the story of the society that built and used them, and the lasting impact they have had on American culture.

March 5, 2015

Defeating Racism Today: What does it Take?

Does the eradication of racist laws really combat institutionalized racism? How does subtle and sometimes hidden institutionalized racism affect the citizens, economy, and future of Washington state?

March 4, 2015

GO! Sense of Place Lecture Series: Oregon’s Special History in Conserving its Environment

Sense of Place is an annual lecture series produced by Gorge Owned that seeks to foster a deeper understanding of and connection to our landscape and to one another. Lectures explore natural history, cultural history, art, and other humanities-related topics.

March 3, 2015

Evolving English: From Beowulf & Chaucer to Texts & Tweets

The program includes a brief, illustrated historical overview of the events that sparked linguistic transitions from the Anglo-Saxon and Anglo-Norman eras to the Middle English era, including the Norman Invasion, the Black Death, and the invention of the printing press.

March 2, 2015 to April 13, 2015

Changing the Face of Power: Women in the U.S. Senate

An exhibition.  Melina Mara began photographing the thirteen women in the U.S. Senate in 2001, continuing as their number grew to fourteen in 2003.

March 2, 2015 to May 31, 2015

Images of Valor: U.S. Latinos and Latinas of World War II

This Humanities Texas traveling exhibition provides a historical overview of U.S. Latino participation in World War II and features historical photographs from the U.S. Latino & Latina WWII Oral History Project archives and contemporary photographs of men and women of the WWII generation by photojournalist Valentino Mauricio.

March 1, 2015

Reno Chamber Orchestra: Pre-Concert Talk and Concert

A pre-concert talk will begin at 1:15 p.m. and end at 1:40 p.m. Moderated by RCO Associate Executive Director Chris Morrison and featuring Music Director Theodore Kuchar and the concert’s guest artist, the conversations are non-technical, designed for a general audience, and typically include a question-and-answer segment for audience participation. The talks and program notes provide information on the music to be performed, the composers, and the historical and cultural background of the music.

March 1, 2015

Theodore Roosevelt - Rough Rider President

Darrel Draper portrays Theodore Roosevelt in a 45 minute, costumed re-enactment of Roosevelt on the campaign trail in his bid for the presidency as the 1912 Progressive "Bull Moose" Party candidate. He reviews his life from his asthma-plagued childhood, his days at Harvard, personal tragedies and victories, military success, and rise to the White House.

February 2015

February 28, 2015

The Secret Life of Henry VIII

Henry VIII was both Renaissance Man and brutal tyrant. He raised England up from the Middle Ages but set the stage for revolution and civil war two generations later. He is famous for his serial matrimony, but as this presentation shows, there’s more to his majesty than lust and worries over an heir. Henry describes his upbringing and his motives for breaking from the Church of Rome as well as his dreams for his people and his realm.

February 27, 2015

Reverend Newton Bush: Terrible Price for Freedom

January 1, 1863 was an historic day in United States history. President Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation took effect, freeing most slaves in the United States. But for enslaved men living in Kentucky and other border states, it was a bittersweet occasion. Lincoln desperately wanted to keep Kentucky loyal to the Union. It was not until 1864, when Kentucky became the last state allowing their enlistment that slaves could join the Union Army. Like many Kentucky-owned slaves, Newton Bush risked his life to escape from his owner and travel to Camp Nelson and enlist in Company E of the 5th Regiment United States Colored Cavalry.

February 27, 2015

The Highwaymen: Florida’s African-American Landscape Painters

This lively PowerPoint-assisted talk relates the story of these now-acclaimed artists, who taught themselves to paint idyllic versions of the Florida landscape and sell their creations door-to-door during the height of the Civil Rights Movement. Their paintings have become the measure of indigenous Florida art and are now celebrated and widely collected. Having written the seminal book that introduced the Highwaymen to the world, Gary Monroe successfully nominated them into the Florida Artists Hall of Fame.

February 26, 2015

Digging Into Native History in New Hampshire

Abenaki history has been reduced to near-invisibility as a result of conquest, a conquering culture that placed little value on the Indian experience, and a strategy of self-preservation that required many Abenaki to go "underground," concealing their true identities for generations to avoid discrimination and persecution.

February 25, 2015

Rap 101: The Message behind the Music

If all art is political, what are the political, cultural, and societal implications of rap? What does rap convey about the state of society today? Using music as a catalyst for discussion, Rap 101 explores contemporary popular culture, diversity issues, and social justice through the lyrics of popular rap music. Sometimes called modern day poetry, rap is an integral part of modern culture. There is no question that music provides a social commentary. It has been said that if you want to understand what is going on in any community, listen to its music.

February 24, 2015

"Map of My Kingdom"

"Map of My Kingdom" will resonate with those who have been or are working through challenging land transfer issues. It will inspire the hesitant and the fearful to start the conversation that cannot wait.

February 23, 2015

The Green Man in Art, Architecture, and Folklore

This presentation will explore questions of origins, influences, contemporary significance, and the rich insights the character might grant us into the complex story of humankind's relationship with nature.

February 21, 2015

The Ethnic Musicals: Assimilation and Integration

A lecture by Marc Courtade.  The melting pot of America was reflected in the Broadway Musicals. The ethnic musicals of the 1960's and 1970's featured contrasting ethnic groups and wove them into the fabric of the American Musical, successfully and unsuccessfully.

February 20, 2015

Contra Dancing In New Hampshire: Then and Now

Since the late 1600s, the lively tradition of contra dancing has kept people of all ages swinging and sashaying in barns, town halls and schools around the state. Contra dancing came to New Hampshire by way of the English colonists and remains popular in many communities, particularly in the Monadnock Region.

February 20, 2015

August Wilson: The Ground On Which I Stand

From his roots as an activist and poet to his indelible mark on Broadway, this program captures the legacy of the man some call America’s Shakespeare.

February 19, 2015

The Harriet Tubman Living History Experience

The most famous conductor of the Underground Railroad, Harriet Tubman helped thousands of enslaved Africans to escape to freedom. Her life story is a monument to courage and fearless resolve. This living history performance depicts this 19th century icon by blending accounts of Tubman's life with an acute sense of Tubman's personal qualities—her emotional depth, profound spirituality and immense intelligence.

February 19, 2015

Dr. Mary McLeod Bethune Comes to Life

Dr. Mary McLeod Bethune (1875-1955) was the founder of Bethune-Cookman University. She served as a New Deal government official — in one of the 20 highest-level offices held by women in the administration, and the highest held by an African American woman; was founder of FDR’s “black cabinet”; served as president of the National Association of Colored Women; founded and served as president of the National Council of Negro Women.

February 18, 2015

Teddy Roosevelt's Nobel Prize: New Hampshire and the Portsmouth Peace Treaty

The program willfocus on how ordinary people from throughout New Hampshire positively affected the Portsmouth negotiations. The program customizes each presentation to the program site's local history at the time of the treaty to encourage audiences to join the annual statewide commemoration of "Portsmouth Peace Treaty Day" on September 5.

February 18, 2015

Defeating Racism Today: What does it Take?

Eva Abram talks about the history of racism, and how it affects specific groups in our society today. She explores how the painful experiences of Jim Crow laws and slavery might ultimately support the pride and achievements of contemporary generations of African Americans. And she discusses how the invisible divide of racism – fed by both knowledge and ignorance – continues to exist despite progress to eradicate it made in recent decades.

February 17, 2015

Abraham Lincoln: "I, too, am a Kentuckian"

Born on a farm in what is now Larue County, Kentucky, Abraham Lincoln spent his early years in the Commonwealth.

February 17, 2015 to February 24, 2015

The Italian Americans

Trace the evolution of Italian Americans from the late 19th century to today, with Tony Bennett, David Chase, John Turturro, Congresswoman Nancy Pelosi, Gay Talese and more with The Italian

February 16, 2015

Underground Railroad Exhibit: Confronting Our Legacy - Slavery and Anti-Slavery in the North

A renovated and expanded exhibition about slavery, abolition, and the Underground Railroad including hands-on interactives and audio elements.

February 16, 2015

Intrigue on the Village Green: The Election of 1733 at St. Paul's

Raising issues of freedom of the press, freedom of religion and voting rights, the canvass represents one of the earliest documented elections in colonial America, and offers a rare glimpse into the political culture of early America.

February 12, 2015

Understanding Racism through Historical & Contemporary Documents

A reading and discussion series for teens exploring the origins of racism to accompany an exhibit by artist Frohawk Two Feathers.

February 11, 2015

Islam 101: Perceptions, Misconceptions, and Context for the 21st Century

What does it mean to be Muslim in a modern world? What if much of what we believe about Islam is incomplete or simply wrong? For more than 1.3 billion people across the world and many people in Washington state, Islam is not only their religion but also a way of life. Led by scholar David Fenner, this presentation focuses on Islam and the many aspects that form the substance of a rich culture, traditions, and a way of life. Endeavoring to provide a complete and accurate view of Islam, Fenner creates an open atmosphere and encourages free dialogue specifically to promote greater understanding of Islam, its history and its place in the modern world.

February 10, 2015

Vanished Veterans - NH's Civil War Monuments and Memorials

Beginning with obelisks of the 1860s and continuing to re-mastered works of the 21st century, historian George Morrison presents a diverse selection of New Hampshire's commemorations.

February 9, 2015

Beyond 12 Years a Slave: The Influential Slave Narratives of Tar Heels Moses Roper, Harriet Jacobs, and William H. Singleton

In this presentation by history educator Laurel Sneed, the audience will learn about three courageous African American Tar Heels who escaped to freedom and authored slave narratives: Harriet Jacobs, of Edenton; Moses Roper, of Caswell County; and William H. Singleton, of New Bern. Sneed will discuss how these three slave narrative authors left their mark on the North American Slave Narrative Literary Tradition. Slave narratives' mission was to convert the hearts and minds of readers so they would become supportive of the anti-slavery cause.

February 8, 2015

Why Aren’t There More Black People in Oregon?

 Author and educator Walidah Imarisha will lead participants through a timeline of Black history in Oregon that speaks to the history of race, identity, and power in this state and the nation. Participants will discuss how history, politics, and culture have shaped—and will continue to shape—the landscape not only for Black Oregonians but all Oregonians.

February 7, 2015

"A Black Homesteader's Struggle"

Philip Burgess uses his poetry and storytelling skills to describe a black family's experience as early settlers in the Missouri River valley of eastern Montana. Seeking refuge from the lynch-mob racism of the post-civil war South, they found dignity and independence on a beautiful and isolated homestead.

February 7, 2015

"A Black Homesteader's Struggle"

Philip Burgess uses his poetry and storytelling skills to describe a black family's experience as early settlers in the Missouri River valley of eastern Montana. Seeking refuge from the lynch-mob racism of the post-civil war South, they found dignity and independence on a beautiful and isolated homestead.

February 5, 2015

(Not So) Elementary, My Dear Watson: The Popularity of Sherlock Holmes

Sherlock Holmes is now a multi-million dollar industry. Why is Sherlock Holmes so popular? Ann McClellan's presentation explores the origins of Arthur Conan Doyle's famous detective and tracks his incarnations in literature, film, advertising, and modern media in order to crack the case of the most popular detective.

February 4, 2015

I’ll Fly Away: A Sojourn through Poetry and Spirituals

Award-winning poet, performer and distinguished scholar Gloria Burgess explores the rich, beautiful heritage of spirituals and poetry from the African-American tradition in a spirited sojourn through words and music. This interactive presentation covers the sometimes hidden meanings of specific spirituals and poems, including how the art helped people cope as they were transported from another culture.

February 3, 2015

Great American Novels: A Contemporary Perspective on Classic Works

A reading and discussion series exploring the characteristics that make works of literature last over time and what makes a novel uniquely American.

February 3, 2015

Guns and America

The topics of gun violence, gun control, and the right to bear arms are constantly in the news. The Second Amendment guarantees Americans the freedom to own guns. Why wasn’t this freedom incorporated into the First Amendment, along with freedom of the press, speech, religion, and right of assembly?

February 2, 2015 to February 27, 2015

Black Art—Ancestral Legacy: The African Impulse in African American Art

This exhibition provides a number of examples from twentieth-century African American artists—both trained and untrained—that visually respond to this question. These modern artists draw heavily on African influence, while simultaneously reinterpreting it for a different time and place. The exhibition surveys the work of forty-five artists, including unknown Africans and Haitians, through photographs, posters, and concise texts.

February 1, 2015

Rally Round the Flag: The American Civil War Through Folksong

Woody Pringle and Marek Bennett present an overview of the American Civil War through the lens of period music. Audience members participate and sing along as the presenters explore lyrics, documents, and visual images from sources such as the Library of Congress.

January 2015

January 31, 2015

Civil War in Missouri: A State Divided

Missouri’s status as a border state forced many of its citizens to make difficult decisions and choose sides in a complex situation that resulted in a bitter, divisive, brutal, and psychological war within a war. Organized along three broad themes, the exhibition looks at the contest for the hearts, minds, and bodies of Missouri’s citizens.

January 30, 2015

Shakespeare Uncovered

Shakespeare Uncovered Returns with Six New Films Telling the Stories Behind Shakespeare’s Greatest Plays, Friday, January 30 at 9 p.m.

January 29, 2015

Ration to Fashion

Presented by Marla Day, Curator at Kansas State University's Textile Museum.  During WWII, war restrictions on clothing led to the "Make Do & Mend" campaign. Learn how homemakers were encouraged to recycle clothing due to fabric shortages.

January 29, 2015

Old Vero Ice Age Site and the Pleistocene People Who Lived There 15,000 Years Ago

Dr. Hemmings, lead archaeologist at the Old Vero Ice Age Site, will discuss the Pleistocene peoples who colonized Florida during the Ice Age, the co-existence of humans and animals. He will talk about life as it was, many centuries ago, in what is now Indian River County, based on past excavations of the Vero Man site, and discuss expectations for future digs.

January 27, 2015

Boom and Bust of the 1920's

The 1920s had a profound and long-lasting influence upon the Sunshine State's architecture, literature, rural and urban life, and race relations.

January 24, 2015

Reno Chamber Orchestra: Pre-Concert Talk and Concert

Multitalented cellist-conductor-composer Emilio Colón makes his debut with the Reno Chamber Orchestra, performing the Symphony for Cello and Orchestra by British composer Benjamin Britten composed for his friend Mstislav Rostropovich.

January 24, 2015

Florida Transportation History: Planes, Trains, & Automobiles (& Steamboats too!)

Examining the changing transportation networks in the state, this presentation shows how Florida moved from a backwoods frontier to one of the most important states in the union. Tying transportation history to social history, this presentation moves from the Bellamy Road of the 1820s to the modern transportation issues facing the Sunshine State in the 21st century.

January 21, 2015

The Finest Hours: The True Story Behind the U.S. Coast Guard's Most Daring Sea Rescue

On February 18, 1952, an astonishing maritime event began when a ferocious nor'easter split in half a 500-foot long oil tanker, the Pendleton, approximately one mile off the coast of Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Incredibly, just twenty miles away, a second oil tanker, the Fort Mercer, also split in half. On both tankers men were trapped on the severed bows and sterns, and all four sections were sinking in 60-foot seas.

January 20, 2015

Martin Luther King Jr. Lecture

Lecture by Robert Shetterly. In his lecture, Mr. Shetterly will share the portraits and the impacts of individuals who have fought for civil rights. In the story of his own journey to becoming a social justice activist, the audience will be inspired to consider how they too can take part in improving their communities and enriching the lives of others.

January 19, 2015

American Indian Imagery in Mascots

Presented by Jason Felihkatubbe (Choctaw), University of Oklahoma.  Explore the history behind the use of American Indian imagery in sports. Hear insights from those familiar with the National Congress of American Indians.

January 19, 2015

Abraham Lincoln: From Springfield, Illinois to Exeter, New Hampshire and Beyond

Lincoln's political life evolved from humble origins to culminate in the presidency of the United States and his leadership during the American Civil War. An illustrated lecture traces the crucial political years of transition from 1858 to 1861 when Lincoln became a national candidate for office and traveled widely.

January 17, 2015

Beyond the Textbooks

A four-part reading and discussion series that uses literature and nonfiction to understand the experiences of ordinary people in the American Revolution.

January 16, 2015

Care and Digitization of Photographs

See the results of a multi-month project to organize, digitize, and archive 500 photographs of Herington from the late 1800s to 1920.

January 16, 2015

Trailing Daniel Boone – D.A.R. Marking Daniel Boone’s Trail, 1912-1915

One hundred years ago, the Daughters of the American Revolution left for us all a legacy of patriotic commemoration—Daniel Boone’s Trail. During 1912-1915, the Daughters in North Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, and Kentucky erected 45 metal tablets across four hundred miles to honor the life of Daniel Boone and to mark for future generations his path through the Appalachian Mountain barrier, a path that enabled America’s Western Movement.

January 15, 2015

The Roots of Music – Exploring Earth’s Soundscapes

One of the finest achievements of humanity is the vibrant musical heritage represented by every historical age, culture, and society—including today’s technological advancements that make the most music available to the most people than ever before.

January 14, 2015

Women and the World Wars: "The Madonnas of Leningrad"

A reading and discussion series exploring the experiences of women during World War I & World War II through novels. Participants will discuss The Madonnas of Leningrad by Debra Dean.

January 12, 2015 to February 7, 2015

The Way Things Were: Texas Settlers and Their Buildings, 1860s–1930s

This Humanities Texas traveling exhibition looks at early Texas buildings for information about settlers' visions of community and progress and their accommodation to the physical demands and economic realities of everyday life.

January 10, 2015 to January 10, 2015

Riding with the Duke: John Wayne in Arizona

John Wayne remains an iconic presence in American popular culture. In this presentation, Gregory McNamee looks at the Duke’s long career in Arizona and the memories he left behind.

January 10, 2015

Laura Ingalls Wilder: Moving West

In her beloved series of books for young people, Laura Ingalls Wilder portrayed pioneer life as an idyllic adventure, filled with warmth and love.

January 9, 2015

Fire From the Kansas Sky: The Piatt Street Plane Crash of 1965

This presentation explores why the plane crashed, how the community responded, and how race relations in Wichita were further strained because of the disaster.

January 8, 2015

Rationing Food During the Depression

The 1930s were a trying time for most Kansans. Learn how people lived through the Depression by hearing what they ate.

January 7, 2015

GO! Sense of Place Lectures Series: Native American Art of Oregon

Sense of Place is an annual lecture series produced by Gorge Owned that seeks to foster a deeper understanding of and connection to our landscape and to one another. Lectures explore natural history, cultural history, art, and other humanities-related topics.

January 7, 2015 to March 1, 2015

Black Art—Ancestral Legacy: The African Impulse in African American Art

This exhibition addresses the question posed by African American poet Countee Cullen in 1926: “What is Africa to me?”  This exhibition provides a number of examples from twentieth-century African American artists—both trained and untrained—that visually respond to this question.

January 6, 2015

"Reflections West"

Reflections West is a weekly radio program that presents the thoughts of writers and scholars on the American West. These thinkers pair their own thoughts with a passage from literature and history.

January 6, 2015 to January 19, 2015

The Road to the Promised Land: Martin Luther King Jr. and the Civil Rights Movement

Exhibition featuring photographs, facsimiles of landmark documents, and quotations by Dr. King and others engaged in the struggle for civil rights, this Humanities Texas traveling exhibition surveys the Civil Rights Movement from the emergence of Martin Luther King Jr. in the Montgomery bus boycott of 1955 through the 1990s.

January 6, 2015

Tambien La Luvia (Even the Rain)

The film explores the skyrocketing costs of water in third world counties when the water supply has been outsourced to multinational corporations. With its emphasis on conflicting water rights, it prefigures the kind of political conflicts that are and that will continue in Kansas as water supplies diminish.

January 3, 2015

The Power of Place: Eudora Welty

In conjunction with the 26th annual Natchez Literary and Cinema Celebration, Copiah-Lincoln Junior College will host a seminar series entitled “The Power of Place: The Natchez Impact on Five Extraordinary Authors” to highlight five Mississippi authors whose works reflect a deep Natchez influence. Each seminar will feature a different author and will include discussions on the author’s life and works by scholars, family members, and friends.

January 2, 2015

Hometown Teams in Rice County

The project is part of "Hometown Teams," a statewide initiative exploring the way sports build and unite communities.

January 1, 2015 to January 4, 2015

RACE: Are We So Different

RACE brings together the everyday experience of living with race, its history, the role of science in that history, and the findings of contemporary science that are challenging its foundations.

December 2014

December 29, 2014 to February 7, 2015

Miguel Covarrubias: Caricaturista

Miguel Covarrubias (1904–1957) was one of the foremost Mexican artists of the twentieth century.

December 16, 2014

Unburied Treasures: Clarence John Laughlin

This humanities series is comprised one-hour programs exploring art, literature and music at the Mississippi Museum of Art in downtown Jackson.

December 15, 2014

Terza Domenica Heritage Series - Nativity Scene and other Italian Christmas Traditions

Nativity scenes are very popular in Italy and are generally found in every household. This tradition dates back to the 13th century and to St. Francis of Assisi. The nativity scenes are associated with Naples, which turned them into an art form. The artisans who have carried on their craft from father to son have organized into a guild that protects their traditions.

December 15, 2014

“The March” by E. L. Doctorow

From the TALK series, The Civil War.  General William Tecumseh Sherman's famous March, the rapacious scorched-earth tromping of Union forces across Georgia and the Carolinas, seemed designed to prove his slogan that "war is hell."  Doctorow in this novel brings to bear a perspective that blends panoramic overview with local experience, freely mixing fictional creations with historical figures.

December 13, 2014

READ from the START (Pre-K)

Read from the Start participants will read and discuss children's books, explore extension activities, and review the role of the parent/caregiver in a child's language development.

December 12, 2014

The Waters of Kansas: A Look at Kansans' Relationship to Water

A series of documentary short films about water in Kansas with public discussions taking place in Burlington, Colby, Great Bend, and Wichita.

December 11, 2014

Sunflower Journeys 2014 - Touring Kansas

A series of programs related to Kansas history, geography and culture that covers a broad range of topics illustrating various aspects of the past, present and future of the Sunflower State.

December 11, 2014

From "Birth of a Nation" to Ken Burns: The Civil War in Cinema

For the 150th anniversary of the Civil War, join film scholar Lance Rhoades in a conversation about the cinema the war has inspired and how it reflects changes in our nation.

December 10, 2014

Lily May Ledford: Coon Creek Girl

Lily Mae Ledford grew up in a musical family in eastern Kentucky’s Red River Gorge. She wanted to fiddle so badly that she traded her most precious possession – a box of crayons – for a broken-down instrument that didn’t have strings, tuning pegs or a bow. She eventually became better known for banjo picking than fiddling, but that old fiddle helped launch a career that brought Lily Mae and her Kentucky mountain music to a national audience.

December 9, 2014

"Reflections West"

Reflections West is a weekly radio program that presents the thoughts of writers and scholars on the American West. These thinkers pair their own thoughts with a passage from literature and history.  Reflections West's aim is simple: to circulate—as widely as possible—wonderful passages of literature and history of the West in a thoughtful and thought-provoking way.

December 8, 2014

Regarding Susan Sontag

Regarding Susan Sontag is an intimate and nuanced investigation into the life of one of the most influential and provocative thinkers of the 20th century.

December 4, 2014

Nebraska's Musical Smorgasbord: Music from Various Ethnic Groups in Nebraska

Explore the rich diversity of folk music that has been a part of Nebraska's history from the time it was a territory to the present day.

December 2, 2014

The Finest Hours: The True Story Behind the U.S. Coast Guard's Most Daring Sea Rescue

Michael Tougias, co-author of the book and soon-to-be Disney movie The Finest Hours, uses slides to illustrate the harrowing tale of the rescue efforts amidst towering waves and blinding snow in one of the most dangerous shoals in the world.

December 2, 2014

The Many Voices of Latino Literature

The participants will encounter many of the themes and motifs that give Latino literature its richness, diversity, and the commonalities that are expressed by writers who share a linguistic and cultural heritage.

December 1, 2014

The Way We Worked in Palm Harbor

The Way We Worked, adapted from an original exhibition developed by the National Archives, explores how work became such a central element in American culture by tracing the many changes that affected the workforce and work environments over the past 150 years.  The exhibition draws from the Archives’ rich collections to tell this compelling story.

December 1, 2014 to December 31, 2014

Southwest Michigan in the Civil War

Exhibit visitors will learn about the life of a local soldier from recruitment to training camp, and arrival on the battlefield.

November 2014

November 29, 2014

Family Adventures in Reading

 A humanities-based family reading program with six storyteller-led sessions in which children aged 6 to 10 and their parents read and discuss engaging, multicultural picture books.

November 28, 2014

Cornhusking: Harvesting the Spirit of Athletic Competition - Smoky Hills Public TV Airing

This film supports "Harvesting the Spirit of Competition," a special exhibit at the Buffalo Bill Cultural Center that explores the Kansas State Cornhusking competition. The project is part of "Hometown Teams," a statewide initiative exploring the way sports build and unite communities.

November 25, 2014

Corn and Khrushchev

Speakers Bureau Program.  Liz Garst recounts the history of agricultural development in Iowa, from early settlement through the fabulous mid-century explosion of farm productivity, based on the hybrid seeds, machinery, fertilizers and livestock technologies promoted by her grandfather. Garst tells how it came to pass that Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev and his family visited the Garst family in 1959.

November 24, 2014

Let's Talk About It, Oklahoma: Crime and Punishment

Let's Talk About It, Oklahoma Reading and Discussion Group.  A Lesson Before Dying.  Presented by Abigail Keegan.

November 22, 2014

Florida Cattle Ranching: Five Centuries of Tradition

Cattle were introduced into the present day United States when Juan Ponce de León brought Spanish cattle to Florida in 1521. Bob Stone's multi-media presentation explores and celebrates the history and culture of the nation's oldest cattle ranching state from the colonial period to the 21st century.  You will see and hear all aspects of Florida cattle ranching traditions including material culture such as Cracker cow-whips and unique ranch gate designs, swamp cabbage and other foodways, cowboy church and Cracker cowboy funerals, Seminole ranching past and present, occupational skills such as roping and branding, our vibrant rodeo culture, side-splitting cowboy poetry, feisty cow-dogs, and much more.

November 21, 2014

Henry Clay - Kentucky's Great Statesman (1777—1852)

Above all, Henry Clay wanted to be president of the United States. Despite never quite making it—he ran and lost three times between 1824 and 1844—Clay played a large role in the history of his country, which he served as a senator, speaker of the house, and secretary of state.

November 20, 2014

Exploring the Ottawa Library

The Ottawa Library has been in existence for 133 years. A panel of library leaders explore the historical impact of the library as it pertains to the quality of life in our community.

November 19, 2014

Dreamers & Schemers: An Evening with Great Floridians

For much of its history, Florida was a wild frontier-the perfect place for someone to disappear or start over. Displaced Native Americans and runaway slaves both made Florida their home for just this reason. Osceola, Francisco Menéndez, and Mary McLeod Bethune each knew that Florida offered them a fresh start and the hope of a brighter future.

November 18, 2014

The Many Voices of Latino Literature

 In this series, we will encounter many of the themes and motifs that give Latino literature its richness as we explore the diversity and the commonalities that are expressed by writers who share a linguistic and cultural heritage.

November 17, 2014

Rachel Carson and the Music of the Spheres

This presentation explores the music in Carson's background and writing, and explores why music reflects her love of the natural world. Included are brief readings from Carson's work and a sampling of musical excerpts from works cited in Carson's writings.

November 15, 2014

Grandmother's Dust Bowl Garden

Drawing from first-hand accounts, this talk explores the vegetables, flowers, and medicinal herbs these women cultivated within the harshest conditions during the Great Depression. By experimenting with and cultivating hardy breeds many women were able to augment their families' menu, larder, meals, and mood.

November 14, 2014

The Immortal Fountain: The Fountain of Youth in Florida's History, Mythology and Art

The story of the Fountain of Youth has proved to be amazingly long-lived and multi-cultural, beginning with the accounts of Herodotus who described a fountain located in Ethiopia that was reputed to give exceptional longevity to those who bathed in its waters. Myths of a magical fountain also appear in the Alexander Romances and in popular culture throughout Asia.

November 14, 2014 to November 15, 2014

A Fire Never Extinguished - How the Civil War Continues to Shape Civic and Cultural Life in America

The Civil War casts a long shadow in the United States. As Robert Penn Warren put it in his classic 1961 book, The Legacy of the Civil War, “many clear and objective facts about America are best understood in reference to the Civil War.”

November 13, 2014

The Lewis & Clark Wildflower Discoveries

During their difficult two-year journey, Lewis and Clark collected specimens and wildflowers during the day and dutifully wrote down their discoveries every night by the campfire.

November 13, 2014

Scandinavian Modern Design: Norwegian Enamel

This exhibition focuses on Norwegian enamel production (technology, innovation, and business) and enamel design. Artistic and technical innovations in enamel work were Norway’s greatest, though least remembered, contributions to the Scandinavian Modern Design movement of the mid-twentieth century.

November 12, 2014 to June 14, 2015

Mendes Cohen Living History Character

Come meet the most interesting person you have never heard of!

November 11, 2014

Camp Dodge: Home Away From Home, 1917-1918

Speakers Bureau Program with Michaela Vogt.  Forty-five minute presentation on the organization, construction, disease, camp life, and other facets of military training conducted at Camp Dodge during World War I. The presentation includes an accompanying slide show of period photographs from the Iowa Gold Star Military Museum collection.

November 10, 2014

Stories of Florida - Con Sabor!

Flowing seamlessly between Spanish and English, Carrie Sue Ayvar chooses from her large repertoire of personal, historical and traditional Florida tales to connect the people and cultures of Florida, con un poquito de sabor Latino - with a little bit of Latino flavor!

November 10, 2014 to January 5, 2015

Vaquero: Genesis of the Texas Cowboy

In the early 1970s, Bill Wittliff visited a ranch in northern Mexico where the vaqueros still worked cattle in traditional ways. Wittliff photographed the vaqueros as they went about daily chores that had changed little since the first Mexican cowherders learned to work cattle from a horse's back. Wittliff captured a way of life that now exists only in memory and in the photographs included in this exhibition.

November 9, 2014

Grass Between the Rails

The subjects cover events of national importance such as the race across Iowa to connect with the transcontinental railroad to the West, and local history, including the poor service offered by the "Slow Norwegian."

November 8, 2014

Bones Beneath Our Feet: The Puget Sound Indian Wars of 1855-56

Participants will explore the causes of the war, cultural misunderstandings and the consequences of fearing a stereotyped “other.” Because there is no simple “right” answer, attendees may also begin to empathize with both sides in a long-ago struggle.

November 7, 2014

Children Stories, Animal Stories and Traditional Lakota Stories

Presentation by Jerome Kills Small.  Kills Small tells children’s stories and animal stories that have been passed down for generations as part of the Lakota and Dakota Sioux traditions. Among the types of stories covered are iktomi (trickster tales) and ohunkanka (old legends).

November 6, 2014

Sevdalinka: A Musical Tour of Bosnia

Drawn from Turkish, Greek, Slavic and German traditions, sevdalinka is a ballad form unique to Bosnia.

November 5, 2014

Tree Army: The Civilian Conservation Corps in Washington State, 1933-1941

During the Great Depression, President Roosevelt created the Civilian Conservation Corps to provide jobs for millions of out-of-work men. But in doing so, he also saved an environment damaged by World War I activities and gave the country new trees, beautiful parks and recreational areas.

November 4, 2014

Florida History from Palmetto-Leaves to The Yearling to River of Grass

Experience Florida through the milieu of three women authors, in character and costume: Harriet Beecher Stowe, Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings, and Marjory Stoneman Douglas. Each wrote a book that put Florida on the map - in 1873, 1938, and 1947, respectively.

November 3, 2014

America's Greatest Conflict: Novels of the Civil War

Sometimes historical facts alone are not enough to evoke the truth of the past -- perhaps this is what Walt Whitman meant when he claimed of the Civil War that 'the real war will never get into the books.' In these selections, novelists use their imaginative powers to re-create the greatest upheaval in our history in a way that touches emotions and senses as much as the intellect.  

November 2, 2014

Caring for Foreign Bodies, the Role of Healthcare in the Transformation of Aliens into Americans

Talk by Dr. Alan M. Kraut, American University, to be held in association with the exhibit Port of Entry to a Continent: Hoboken and the Federal Immigration Process, 1892-1924.

November 1, 2014

Buen Provecho: The History of Food in Latin America

An exhibit focusing on food in Latin American culture to be held in connection with the Newark Public Library’s celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month.

October 2014

October 31, 2014

Friedrich Nietzsche on European Nihilism

This conference will focus on the issue of moral meaninglessness, Nihilism, and its effects. 

October 30, 2014

How the Internet Changed the Media and Why Newspapers, Music, and Television Will Never Be the Same

Among the topics to be explored: will there be a printed newspaper in any city ten years from now? Will newsstands and bookstores disappear as fast as record stores? Will movie theaters exist in their present form? Will prime-time television vanish?

October 29, 2014 to November 1, 2014

2014 Native American Days

Native American Days 2014 will feature Native American arts and crafts, storytelling, games, food, dancing, singing, primitive weapons and children’s activities.

October 29, 2014

If I am Not For Myself, Who Will Be for Me? George Washington's Runaway Slave

Oney Judge Staines, according to the Constitution, was only three-fifths of a person. To her masters, George and Martha Washington, she was merely "the girl." All she wanted was the freedom to control her own actions, but her account of escaping the Executive Mansion in Philadelphia, fleeing north and establishing a life in New Hampshire is not a typical runaway story.

October 28, 2014

A Soldier's Mother Tells Her Story

Speaking as Betsey Phelps, the mother of a Union soldier from Amherst, New Hampshire who died heroically at the Battle of Gettysburg, Sharon Wood offers an informative and sensitive reflection on that sacrifice from a mother's perspective.

October 27, 2014

Book Voyagers "The World Around Us"

Sessions will explore multi-cultural books and stories.

October 26, 2014

Celebrating the Manteo Sicilian Marionette Tradition in New York

This distinctive art form of marionette theater emerged in Sicily in the early nineteenth century, though the tradition of performing the Orlando cycle with marionettes dates back to the sixteenth century.

October 26, 2014

Created Equal: Conversations on the American Social Contract

Mass Humanities celebrates its fortieth anniversary with a film-and-discussion program that takes on urgent questions about the American social contract today.

October 25, 2014 to May 17, 2015

La Belle: The Ship That Changed History

On October 25, 2014, the shipwreck La Belle will be reconstructed live at the Bullock Museum in the special exhibition,

October 24, 2014

Beehive Archive - all of the history & none of the dust!

Tune in for the Beehive Archive, a two-minute look at some of the most pivotal—and peculiar—events in Utah's history.

October 24, 2014

Earthquakes, Chukars and Millionaires: The Mackay Mines Story

The exhibit celebrates Nevada's sesquicentennial, and it will be interactive and encourage visitor participation; for example, visitors will see and have an opportunity to attempt a 1920s geology exam.

October 23, 2014

Oh Heavens! Saviors and Saints on the Arizona Frontier

Meet five altruistic women who influenced the history of the Arizona territory.

October 23, 2014

Created Equal: Conversations on the American Social Contract

Mass Humanities celebrates its fortieth anniversary with a film-and-discussion program that takes on urgent questions about the American social contract today.

October 22, 2014

Muslim Journeys Films

Muslim Journeys Films are free, library-based film and discussion series.

October 21, 2014

Still Allies? The U.S. and Europe

World in Your Library is a free, library-based foreign policy speakers series that provides communities with the opportunity to explore current issues with experts.

October 20, 2014

Thanksgiving: The Great American Holiday

The evolution of Thanksgiving, from the "First Thanksgiving" in 1621 to the present day, this program explores what this holiday and its food traditions mean for American culture and identity.

October 19, 2014

Patchwork of the Prairie

Yvonne Hollenback presents a trunk show of approximately 30 quilts made by members of the same family spanning 135 years. The stories behind both the quilters and the quilts themselves are shared and accompanied with some of Hollenbeck’s own cowboy/cowgirl poetry.

October 19, 2014

Created Equal: Conversations on the American Contract

Mass Humanities celebrates its fortieth anniversary with a film-and-discussion program that takes on urgent questions about the American social contract today.

October 18, 2014

Beyond the Textbooks

During this first session, participants will be discussing The Traitor's Wife, by Allison Pataki.

October 17, 2014

“The Good Earth” by Pearl S. Buck

From the TALK series, Living with the Land.   Discussion Leader: Sandra Wiechert.

October 16, 2014

Written in Thread: Arizona Women’s History Preserved in Their Quilts

Beginning with 1860s Mexican women, through 1990s Hopi women, this presentation introduces women who pioneered Arizona through quilts they stitched.

October 15, 2014 to November 14, 2014

Crossroads of Empire: Early Printed Maps of the American Southwest

The traveling exhibition spans the mapmaking enterprise, beginning with the earliest known map to show the Texas edge of the Gulf (1512) and ending with an 1873 map of Texas showing the right of way granted to railroads.

October 14, 2014

What it Means to be a Mainer

Within a meticulously researched performance, Maine at Work takes historical documents and characters, humor, little known facts, thought-provoking tales (tall and otherwise), and perspectives from real Mainers to show the pattern of work in Maine.

October 13, 2014

A Century of Fashion, 1870 - 1970

Sue McLain, owner of Yesterday’s Lady, a vintage fashion museum/store in Beatrice, has been traveling the Midwest since 1991 sharing her extensive collection of clothing from 1840 through 1980 and teaching groups about the history of fashion.

October 12, 2014

The Engine of Infrastructure by railroad historian Robert Hirning

Mr. Hirning quotes Edna St. Vincent Millay in saying "There isn't a train I wouldn't take no matter where it’s going."

October 12, 2014

Mary Settles: The Last Shaker at Pleasant Hill

Mary Settles saw the Civil War from the point of view of the Shakers, her adopted extended family.

October 12, 2014

President U.S. Grant

Step back to the Civil War era and listen to tales and personal history from one of America’s most famous generals. This Chautauqua-style portrayal takes Ulysses S. Grant from personal mediocrity to his promotion to the highest-ranking general in the Union Army.

October 11, 2014

Let’s Talk About It: Stiff Upper Lips

The Woman in White by Wilkie Collins and The Woman in White film presentation by Dr. Celeste McMaster. Dr. McMaster specializes in 19th century British literature, with secondary emphases in 20th century British and creative writing.

October 11, 2014

Creekside Festival

This year, the festival celebrates its 10th anniversary with the addition of more historical demonstrators and even more exciting family activities.

October 10, 2014

Sharing Patterns, Sharing Lives: Kansas Quilt Workshop

Learn about Kansas quilts from the early 20th century and the unique collaborations that sparked "the Emporia, Kansas phenomenon" and some of the finest quilts of the 20th century.

October 9, 2014

Church and State: Religion and Politics in America

How did these traditions begin, and what issues prompted their adoption? What does their ongoing practice say about religious identity in American public life?

October 9, 2014

"Dia de los Muertos" - A Celebration of Life and Death

 To understand Día de los Muertos one has to set aside preconceived notions.

October 8, 2014

Mark Twain: American Icon

Through his characters and stories, Twain single-handedly put American literature on the map.  Chautaugua performed by actor: Robert Brock.

October 6, 2014 to November 14, 2014

Changing the Face of Power: Women in the U.S. Senate

The exhibition based on Melina Mara's work, was created by the Dolph Briscoe Center for American History at The University of Texas at Austin.

October 6, 2014

Created Equal: America's Civil Rights Struggle

Created Equal: America's Civil Rights Struggle is a series of four important documentary film screenings at multiple locations across Colorado. An initiative of the National Endowment for the Humanities, partnering with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, Created Equal uses the power of documentary films to encourage community discussion of America's civil rights history.

October 5, 2014

Grimm's Grimmest: The Darker Side of Fairy Tales

The dramatic retellings, some sung as ballads, are accompanied on 16th Century Renaissance lute set to 16th century French and English ballad tunes.

October 4, 2014

Strong Celtic Women

In this presentation, the speaker will draw on his own publications and personal knowledge, as well as the most recent findings of genome studies to explore centuries of strong Celtic women.

October 4, 2014

Excess Baggage: Riding the Orphan Train

Presented by Charlotte Endorf. Endorf traveled more than 8,500 miles, seeking the last surviving riders and descendents to document the real-life stories of the children who rode the Orphan Trains between the years 1854 and 1929.

October 3, 2014

Witches, Pop Culture, and the Past

In 1692, nineteen people were executed in Salem and hundreds imprisoned during a witch hunt we still discuss today. 

October 2, 2014

Every Person Their Own Historian: A Quick Lesson on Doing Oral History

 All participants will receive examples of oral history release forms, sample questions, and ideas for doing oral history. 

October 1, 2014

Women and the World Wars First Discussion: Return of the Soldier

During this first session, participants will be discussing The Return of the Soldier, by Rebecca West.

October 1, 2014 to November 21, 2014

Annexation: Celebrating Texas Statehood

This Humanities Texas traveling exhibition narrates the story of Texas as a Mexican colony and Republic, its campaign to join the United States, the vote for annexation, and the consequences of that vote.

September 2014

September 27, 2014 to February 1, 2015

Flint Hills Forces: The Shaping of Manhattan, Fort Riley and Kansas State University 1917-1963

Exhibition and series of public programs exploring the history of the region between 1917 and 1963.

September 27, 2014

Founding Gardens: Penn, Washington and Jefferson

The gardens of three eminent American historical figures William Penn, George Washington and Thomas Jefferson are the focus of this highly visual presentation. The element that binds them together is the Quaker gardening tradition.

September 26, 2014

Heart of the Drum: The Story of the Delaware Tribe of Indians in Kansas

The Delaware Indian's history in Kansas is chronicled in this full-length documentary film.

September 26, 2014 to May 25, 2015

Chinese American: Exclusion/Inclusion

Chinese American: Exclusion/Inclusion chronicles the complex history of the Chinese in America, from the early days of the China trade to the history of Chinese immigration and the life of Chinese Americans.

September 25, 2014

David Thoreson: Personal Adventures and Explorations of the Northwest Passage

David tells adventure stories visually, stitching voyages together and along the way go into brief history, photography and landscape, trip planning, ice charts, wildlife, native villages, and changes in the environment contributing to loss of Arctic ice.

September 24, 2014

Healing African Dance

Through lecture, video and demonstration, audiences learn about different categories of African dance (e.g., social, folklore and ritual) that are performed in various contexts in African life from births, to naming ceremonies, to weddings, to death.

September 23, 2014

Do Not Toss Out Your Grandmother’s Letters; a spirited defense of epistolary voyeurism, or the merits of reading someone else’s mail.

Poet and author Emily Herring Wilson will discuss the art of letter-writing, with a focus on the letters of Elizabeth Lawrence, master garden writer and letter writer, as well as selected letters from other women writers.

September 21, 2014

George Washington's Long Island Spy Ring

The Culper Spy Ring was created on Long Island in 1778 by then-Dragoon Major Benjamin Tallmadge of Setauket, under Washington's leadership.

September 20, 2014

Buffalo Soldiers: Military Heroes of the Southwest

From Medal of Honor recipients to the common trooper, from Indian battles to battles with lawbreakers, learn how a small number of Black troopers made a difference in the lives of law-abiding citizens.

September 19, 2014

Your Florida Story, Made-to-Order

Your group's story is as important a piece of Florida history as that of any other.

September 18, 2014

Steeltowns, Coalfields and the Unbroken Circle

With guitar, banjo and harmonica accompaniment, audiences will be captivated while they learn about the history behind West Virginia's coal industry and about generations of workers in the steel, coal and glass industries of Pittsburgh.

September 17, 2014 to January 24, 2015

The World Knew: Jan Karski's Mission for Humanity

This exhibition illustrates Jan Karski’s mission of courage during World War II, and his subsequent life and testimony.

September 17, 2014

Chautauqua in Durango!

Join us at this great Colorado Humanities event, free and open to all!

September 15, 2014

Women’s Attitudes Towards Secession and the Civil War

Original, unpublished documents and correspondence from gifted Sandhills women provide unique and fascinating perspectives of the beginning, middle, and end of the Civil War period in North Carolina.

September 14, 2014

Art Deco New York: From the Chrysler Building to the Grand Concourse

In New York, Art Deco evolved through a series of Manhattan skyscrapers into the city's chief architectural language.

September 14, 2014 to September 20, 2014

The Roosevelts: An Intimate History

Ken Burns’s seven-part, 14-hour documentary weaves the stories of Theodore, Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt, three members of one of the most prominent and influential families in American

September 13, 2014 to October 24, 2014

Journey Stories

Journey stories are tales of how we and our ancestors came to America – and are a central element of our personal heritage.

September 12, 2014 to September 14, 2014

Living History The Final Invasion Plattsburgh, New York

The Bicentennial of the Battle of Plattsburgh is a once in a lifetime opportunity to have history come alive in an extraordinary way for teachers and the public.

September 12, 2014

James McNeill Whistler & The Case for Beauty

An art star, dandy, instigator and radical artistic visionary, James McNeill Whistler (1834–1903) introduced ideas and forms that were avant-garde for their time.

September 11, 2014

Witness to the Holocaust

Holocaust survivor and scholar Dr. Walter Ziffer will present "Witness to the Holocaust."  Using accounts from his own experiences, Ziffer will describe the treatment received by prisoners, liberation by the Soviet army, and beginning a new life after the war.

September 11, 2014

Created Equal: Conversations on the American Social Contract

Mass Humanities celebrates its fortieth anniversary with a film-and-discussion program that takes on urgent questions about the American social contract today.

September 10, 2014

Kansas Women, Work, and the Civil War

Women assumed clerical positions in the U.S. government; turned their homes into cottage factories to make blankets, bandages, and uniforms; and even disguised themselves as men in order to serve as combat soldiers on the battlefield.

September 10, 2014

"The Quarrel with Ourselves"

19th Annual Governors Lecture in the Humanities: The Quarrel with Ourselves featuring U.S. Poet Laureate Natasha Trethewey.

September 9, 2014

Frankenstein Lives! The Continuing Relevance of Mary Shelley's Novel

How could such an immortal work have been thought up by a sixteen year old girl in an era when women were not expected to write novels at all, let alone ones with such disturbing and provocative themes?

September 8, 2014

The Culture of Bluegrass Music in North Carolina: My Life As An Accidental Bluegrass Musician

While many people associate Kentucky with Bluegrass Music, the fact is many of the pioneers of this indigenous American art form were North Carolina born and bred.

September 8, 2014 to September 9, 2014

Hiking in Penn's Woods: A History

Discover the unique culture of hiking that emerged out of local clubs and provided an impetus for "getting back to nature" throughout most of the 20th century

September 7, 2014 to December 12, 2014

Bandits & Heroes, Poets & Saints: Popular Art of the Northeast of Brazil

The story of how African, European, and indigenous cultural traditions have interacted over a period of more than 500 years to form the distinctive culture of this fascinating area of the largest country in South America.

September 6, 2014

An Artist in the World Wars

Henry Varnum Poor, a native of Chapman, Kansas, was already an accomplished artist when he was drafted to serve in World War I. His duties along the frontlines were dangerous, but he was able to document his surroundings and fellow soldiers in paintings, drawings, and prints.

September 6, 2014

Tom Milligan: Prairie Rebel

In this 45-minute, one-man show, Grant Wood chats with the audience as if talking to an old friend across the backyard fence, or maybe at his home at Five Turner Alley in Cedar Rapids.

September 1, 2014 to September 30, 2014

Working Hands: An Exhibition of Photographs by Rick Williams

Working Hands: An Exhibition of Photographs by Rick Williams features forty finely detailed photographs that evoke a powerful sense of what it must feel like to engage in the work depicted, as well as the unique character each industry brings to the Texas landscape.

September 1, 2014 to September 30, 2014

The Blessings of Liberty: The U.S. Constitution

This exhibition seeks to explain the immense importance of a document that holds answers to challenging questions of government and features twelve panels charting the progress of former colonies to a united nation.

August 2014

August 30, 2014

2014 National Book Festival

Come to the 14th annual Library of Congress National Book Festival, which will be held Saturday, August 30 from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. at the Walter E.

August 29, 2014

Dorothea Lange: Grab a Hunk of Lightning

Documentary on the life and work of Depression-era photographer Dorothea Lange

August 28, 2014

Traditional and Historical Songs of New York State

Dave Ruch presents and tells the stories behind the songs of real New Yorkers from days gone by - farmers, lumbermen, children, immigrants, Native Americans, canallers, hops pickers, lake sailors, and more - music from the people who settled and built our state.

August 28, 2014

Ukrainian Immigration to the Coal Region of Northeastern Pennsylvania

 Audiences learn the reasons for this first major wave of Ukrainian immigration and explore the cultural legacy of the early immigrants.

August 24, 2014

Mapping the Merrimack: A Frontier Adventure into Uncharted Territory 1630-1725

The program describes some of the early survey techniques and cartography and is illustrated with the maps of the period.

August 23, 2014

I Can't Die But Once - Harriet Tubman's Civil War

The US Government enlisted Tubman as a scout and spy for the Union cause and she battled courageously behind enemy lines during the Civil War, but Tubman is best known for her role as a conductor on the Underground Railroad.

August 21, 2014

Time Travel in Popular Culture

Learn how the depiction of time travel has changed in literature and film and discuss the reasons for its continuing popular appeal.

August 20, 2014

Family Stories: How and Why to Remember and Tell Them

Storytelling connects strangers, strengthens links between generations, and gives children the self-knowledge to carry them through hard times.

August 17, 2014

That Reminds Me of a Story

Stories speak to us of community. They hold our history and reflect our identity.

August 17, 2014

Representing the American Landscape: The People's Parks

Drawing on visual images like paintings, illustrations and photography, promotional materials, explorers' accounts, this lecture explores the history of the park as landscape, retreat, resource, and more.

August 16, 2014

Matilda Joslyn Gage: Bringing Her Into History

Matilda Joslyn Gage offered her Fayetteville, New York home as a station on the Underground Railroad, was adopted into the Wolf Clan of the Mohawk Nation, edited a newspaper, encouraged her son-in-law, L. Frank Baum, to write his Oz stories, and worked for the separation of church and state.

August 16, 2014

Literary Walking Tour of Mt. Vernon

Follow in the footsteps of the many famous authors, poets, and editors who sojourned in Baltimore’s cultural hub.

August 15, 2014

The Courage to Continue: Changing Homesteads in Nebraska

Cherrie Beam-Clarke, in period attire with Irish brogue, depicts Nebraska life on the prairie, 1870 to 1885. The pioneer stories are factual and reflect the diversity of the people and land from western to eastern Nebraska.

August 15, 2014

A Sense of Place: Vermont's Farm Legacy

 In Vermont the cultural legacy of farming has strongly influenced the identity of Vermonters, and it is these distinctive traditions, which have persisted even with the decline in farm numbers, that help make the state unique.

August 15, 2014

The Roaring '20s in Fox Trot Tempo

Perhaps more than any other decade, the history of the 1920s is captured in the popular music of the day.

August 14, 2014

Trunks and Travel... a 19th Century Journey

Exploring the preparations of a wealthy Victorian industrialist and his wife as they get ready to travel, participants learn about transportation modes, rules and etiquette of the road, proper attire, and the era's social expectations.

August 11, 2014

New Hampshire's One-Room Rural Schools: The Romance and the Reality

Hundreds of one-room schools dotted the landscape of New Hampshire a century ago and were the backbone of primary education for generations of children.

August 9, 2014

New Hampshire's One-Room Rural Schools: The Romance and the Reality

Revered in literature and lore, they actually were beset with problems, some of which are little changed today. The greatest issue was financing the local school and the vast differences between taxing districts in ability to support education.

August 9, 2014

The History of Trick Roping and the Wild West Show

South of the border in Old Mexico, the charros created rope spinning -making intricate flower designs with ropes. When Vincente Otopeza introduced this trick roping tradition to Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show in 1894, he gave American cowboys a different perspective on trick and fancy roping.

August 8, 2014

Dust Covered Dreams

Dust Covered Dreams details the experiences of the Eymann family in Oakdale, Nebraska during the 1930s.  Dust covered the dreams of the Eymanns and changed their futures as it did for thousands of Nebraska families.

August 5, 2014

Exemplary Country Estates of New Hampshire

In the early 20th Century, the New Hampshire Board of Agriculture launched a program to boost the rural economy and promote tourism through the sale of abandoned farms to summer residents.

August 4, 2014 to August 29, 2014

Voces Americanas: Latino Literature in the United States

A celebratory survey of works by Latinos in the past thirty years.

August 2, 2014

Searching for the Life of Harriet Hemings

Sometime in 1822 Harriet Hemings (the second of Sally Hemings' children) left Thomas Jefferson's Monticello, boarded a stagecoach to Philadelphia and all but disappeared.

August 2, 2014

Ukrainian Immigration to the Anthracite Coal Region of NE Pennsylvania

 Audiences learn the reasons for this first major wave of Ukrainian immigration and explore the cultural legacy of the early immigrants.

August 1, 2014

A Monument in Stone and Steel

In 1883, a stone and steel work of art opened to the public, allowing rapid transportation between Brooklyn and New York.

August 1, 2014 to August 29, 2014

Citizens at Last: The Woman Suffrage Movement in Texas

Created to celebrate the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment.

August 1, 2014 to September 1, 2014

Dugout Canoes: Paddling Through the Americas

Discover how dugout canoes have affected life and travel throughout the Americas and explore the world's largest archaeological find - 101 ancient dugouts at Newnans Lake.

July 2014

July 29, 2014

Our State Fair - Iowa's Blue Ribbon Story

Our State Fair - Iowa's Blue Ribbon Story is the book that chronicles 150 years of Iowans who have made up that unique August experience.

July 23, 2014

Grand Central Terminal: 100 Years of a New York Landmark

This illustrated lecture by Anthony W. Robins brings the Grand Central Terminal to life - its remarkable history, stunning architecture, and central role in creating midtown Manhattan.

July 20, 2014

Recent Unpleasantness or the Uncivil War

Iowa's place in the events before the civil -- excerpts used from soldiers' letters home.

July 20, 2014

Cornucopia Oral History DVD-Premiere

This film features interviews with community elders sharing the story of logging, farming, and fishing during the early years of settlement.

July 20, 2014

Cornucopia Oral History DVD-Premiere

This film features interviews with community elders sharing the story of logging, farming, and fishing during the early years of settlement.

July 19, 2014

Art in Food and Food in Art

A lusciously illustrated slide-talk on food and drink seen in the 17th century Dutch Masters and their relevance to the American kitchen today.

July 19, 2014

Literary Walking Tour of Mt. Vernon

 Follow in the footsteps of the many famous authors, poets, and editors who sojourned in Baltimore’s cultural hub.

July 17, 2014

The Work of Rural Kansas Children

From gathering firewood and hunting game to tending stock and weeding gardens, children's activities were crucial to families' survival on Kansas homesteads, farms, and ranches.

July 16, 2014

Boats and Boating in the Adirondacks

This illustrated lecture explores boatshops, liveries, and a way of life and leisure that has all but vanished.

July 13, 2014

Remember the Ladies: A History of American Women in Song

By looking at the popular songs of the past -- the ballads, love songs, suffrage anthems, work songs and dance tunes -- we can trace the perceptions and realities of women's lives.

July 12, 2014

Pennsylvania German Music, Dance and Instruments

Through dance, songs and stories, audiences explore the traditions of Pennsylvania German music and dance.

July 12, 2014

Iowa History in a Cloth Bag

Flour sacks, feed sacks and seed sacks will tell the story from relief work by Herbert Hoover to clothes and quilts in the 1950’s.

July 10, 2014

Made in the USA: The Music of Aaron Copland

Copland was our first composer to achieve international fame.

July 10, 2014

On Being with Krista Tippett: W.E.B. Du Bois

Krista Tippett's national public radio program On Being examines the teachings and legacy of African-American nationalist and NAACP founder, W.E.B.

July 9, 2014

The Kansas Work Ethic of Dwight D. Eisenhower

Young Ike worked various jobs, from selling vegetables and his mother's hot tamales door-to-door, to laboring as a farmhand and working for several years at the Belle Springs Creamery.  He managed these jobs while earning good grades in school and participating in sports and community activities.

July 8, 2014

On the Waterfront and the Hollywood Blacklist

This illustrated lecture will examine the climate in America that led to HUAC's ascent to power and will offer examples of the kinds of films that HUAC felt were subtle communist propaganda.

July 8, 2014

Community Conversation for Kids

This conversation invites children and families to discuss the value of friendship and the ways in which cooperation can help us persevere in the face of daunting odds.

July 8, 2014 to December 31, 2014

Stable Views: Life in the Backstretch of the Thoroughbred Racetrack

This exhibition that uses art, photography, and oral histories to explore the daily life of those who work in the stable areas of New York's thoroughbred racetracks.

July 7, 2014

Beehive Archive - all of the history & none of the dust!

Tune in for the Beehive Archive, a two-minute look at some of the most pivotal—and peculiar—events in Utah's history.

July 1, 2014

Tom Milligan: The Not So Quiet Librarian

Forrest Spaulding wrote the Library Bill of Rights, which was adopted by the American Library Council in 1938, and in Spaulding's own words "means as much today as it did yesterday and will tomorrow."

June 2014

June 29, 2014

Coal Mining Songs of the Northeast

Musical program highlights the struggles and disasters of coal miners in northeast Pennsylvania.

June 29, 2014

Brooklyn Bridge Forever: A Monument in Stone and Steel

This presentation will map the development and construction of the Brooklyn Bridge and show how 19th century pioneers overcame natural hindrances to create a work of art, "The Eighth Wonder of the Modern World."

June 28, 2014

Homemade Music in Pennsylvania

Long before we learned how to download music from the Internet, people in Pennsylvania knew how to make music out of whatever raw materials were available.

June 27, 2014

Legislation Impossible: The Civil Rights Act of 1964

On the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, BackStory Radio looks at how it became law. 

June 26, 2014

Banjos, Bones, and Ballads

Traditional songs, rich in local history and a sense of place, present the latest news from the distant past.

June 25, 2014 to June 29, 2014

Nebraska Chautaqua: Free Land? 1862 and the Shaping of Modern America --Scottsbluff

Nebraska Chautauqua on homesteading, migration and displacement on the Great Plains

June 24, 2014

New Hampshire's Grange Movement: Its Rise, Triumphs and Decline

Much of rural New Hampshire in the late 19th century was locked in a downward spiral of population decline, abandonment of farms, reversion of cleared land to forest and widespread feelings of melancholy and loss. The development of the Grange movement in the 1880s and 1890s was aided greatly by hunger for social interaction, entertainment and mutual support.

June 24, 2014

Freedom Summer

Over 10 memorable weeks in 1964 known as Freedom Summer, more than 700 student volunteers from around the country joined organizers and local African Americans in a historic effort to shatter the foundations of white supremacy in what was one of the nation’s most viciously racist, segregated states.

June 21, 2014

George Drouillard: Hunter/Sign Talker for Lewis and Clark

Half French and half Shawnee Indian, this expert hunter, Indian sign talker and wilderness woodsman was called upon by the two captains whenever they needed a nearly impossible task to be completed.

June 20, 2014 to September 21, 2014

Behind Closed Doors: Art in the Spanish American Home, 1492–1898

The first major exhibition in the United States to explore the private lives and interiors of Spain’s New World elite from 1492 through the nineteenth century.

June 20, 2014

Frederick Law Olmsted: Designing America

The life and legacy of the man who made public parks an essential part of American life

June 20, 2014

America, Inc.: A History of Corporations

BackStory radio examines the history of America corporations

June 19, 2014

One Trail, Many Voices: Songs of the Oregon Trail

Folksinger and storyteller Hank Cramer will share traditional folksongs and culture of the Pacific Northwest's Orgeon Trail.

June 19, 2014

Author! Author! Literary Series: Geraldine Brooks

Geraldine Brooks was awarded the Pulitzer Prize in fiction in 2006.

June 18, 2014

Vanished Veterans - NH's Civil War Monuments and Memorials

Beginning with obelisks of the 1860s and continuing to re-mastered works of the 21st century, historian George Morrison presents a diverse selection of New Hampshire's commemorations.

June 18, 2014 to June 22, 2014

Nebraska Chautauqua: Free Land? 1862 and the Shaping of Modern America -- Norfolk

Nebraska Chautauqua on homesteading, migration and displacement on the Great Plains

June 17, 2014

The Shaker Legacy

Darryl Thompson shares some of his personal memories of the Canterbury Shakers.

June 17, 2014

Freedom Riders

In 1961, segregation seemed to have an overwhelming grip on American society.

June 16, 2014

The Connecticut: New England's Great River

Adair Mulligan leads an armchair tour of this great river in New Hampshire and Vermont, exploring its history and natural beauty through the seasons and among the communities that have sprung up along its banks.

June 16, 2014

Freedom Summer discussion at the Newseum in Washington, DC

A conversation with civil rights leaders and the director of a new NEH-funded documentary on the 1964 Freedom Summer campaign to register black voters in Mississippi

June 14, 2014 to September 7, 2014

Archibald Motley: Jazz Age Modernist

Retrospective of Jazz Age artist Archibald Motley's scenes of life in the African-American community

June 14, 2014

Civil War in Missouri: A State Divided

Missouri’s status as a border state forced many of its citizens to make difficult decisions and choose sides in a complex situation that resulted in a bitter, divisive, brutal, and psychological war within a war.

June 12, 2014

Native American History of New Hampshire: Beyond Boundaries, circa 1700-1850

The northern frontier of New England was a risky place during the Colonial Period.

June 11, 2014

Bones Beneath Our Feet: The Puget Sound Indian Wars of 1855-56

A story of extremes: great courage, cultural misunderstanding, interracial love, heroism and cruelty.

June 10, 2014

Treading Lightly or Stomping

Overview of mankind’s impact on the earth, using songs, poems, and stories with environmental themes.

June 10, 2014

Native American History of New Hampshire: Alliance and Survival, circa 1400-1700

David Stewart-Smith begins this program with the last part of the Woodland Period, when Indians in northern New England were faced with several challenges. By the time of French and English exploration in the region, strong tribal alliances had begun to center along southeastern Maine, coastal and central New Hampshire, and the north shore of Massachusetts. These relationships became known as the Pennacook alliance; a confederacy of about 16 tribal and family groups that held together through severe climate change, European colonization, devastating epidemic disease, and intertribal warfare.

June 9, 2014 to February 1, 2015

Earthquakes, Chukars and Millionaires: The Mackay Mines Story

The exhibit celebrates Nevada's sesquicentennial, and it will be interactive and encourage visitor participation; for example, visitors will see and have an opportunity to attempt a 1920s geology exam.

June 8, 2014

Nebraska Archaeology: 10,000 B.C.E. to Circa 1800 C.E.

This program discusses the lengthy human occupation prior to the arrival of Euro-Americans in Nebraska.

June 7, 2014

Hidden Treasures in Washington's Museums

There are surprising political, philosophical, artistic, environmental and historic reasons why museums keep objects from view.

June 7, 2014

2014 Sweetgrass Cultural Arts Festival

The 10th Annual Sweetgrass Cultural Arts Festival is designed to bring focus and attention to the endangered Gullah Geechee peoples history, culture, music, language and art form.

June 6, 2014

The New Front Page: 21st Century Journalism and What It Means for You

Is the role of journalism to provide stories that we want to hear or news that we need to hear?

June 5, 2014

Conquerors: Roosevelt, Truman and the Destruction of Hitler's Germany 1941-1945

The Conquerors reveals how Franklin Roosevelt's and Truman's private struggles with their aides and Churchill and Stalin affected the unfolding of the Holocaust and the fate of vanquished Nazi Germany.

June 4, 2014

Analog Days: How Technology Changed Our Culture

This conversation, led by technology expert Alex Alben, explores how digital inventions are shaping communication, political discourse and today’s media landscape.

June 1, 2014

Rachel Carson, Silent Spring, 1962

Although their role will probably always be less celebrated than wars, marches, riots or stormy political campaigns, it is books that have at times most powerfully influenced social change in American life.

May 2014

May 31, 2014

St Augustine: America's Most Paintable City

James Zacharias, Senior Curator of Education and Curator of History at Daytona Beach Museum of Arts and Sciences, returns with a unique program highlighting the history of St. Augustine through the art of America's greatest painters who wintered there from 1876 to 1950.

May 30, 2014

Let's Talk About It - West on 66: A Mystery

Let's Talk About It - West on 66: A Mystery.  Oklahoma Humanities Council's Reading and Discussion Group presented by Sara Jane Richter.

May 29, 2014

"Reflections West"

Reflections West's aim is simple: to circulate—as widely as possible—wonderful passages of literature and history of the West in a thoughtful and thought-provoking way.

May 27, 2014

Urban Indians: Native American Writers of the 1990s - "Reservation Blues" by Sherman Alexie

From the TALK series, Urban Indians: Native American Writers of the 1990s. Discussion Leader: Gene Chavez.

May 26, 2014

Gray County Korean War Veterans Oral History Project

Public event to share the results of a yearlong oral history project to collect, preserve, and share the stories of Gray County's Korean War veterans.

May 26, 2014

Death and the Civil War

Drawing heavily on This Republic of Suffering, historian and Harvard president Drew Gilpin Faust’s acclaimed book, Death and the Civil War explores a critical but largely

May 24, 2014 to July 20, 2014

Museum on Main Street: Journey Stories – Casper

Journey Stories explore how travel has shaped the U.S. both culturally and economically.

May 21, 2014

Stories, Songs and Sodbusters

The presentation features homesteader’s songs of hope and then disappointment as they traveled to the “Great American Desert.”

May 20, 2014

Swept by Ocean Breezes: A History of Coney Island

 In an age that was limited by finances and in its mobility, summer at Coney Island became a utopia, only diminished by modern inventions and a more worldly view.

May 19, 2014

Where Comedy Went to School

This lecture takes listeners on an informative, hilarious journey east of Eden, west of the Moon, and 100 miles north of New York City, where a generation of Jewish comedians honed their craft in the resorts of the Catskill Mountains.

May 18, 2014

Mozart's 'Vesperae Solennes de Confessore' and Schubert's 'Mass in A flat Major'

The Philadelphia Singers has been the mid-Atlantic region's premier chorus for over forty years, garnering national acclaim for artistic excellence.

May 17, 2014

Capitán Rafael Chacón

Capitán Rafael Chacón was witness to the most significant events in the formation of modern New Mexico, from the US invasion of 1846 to statehood in 1912.

May 16, 2014 to May 18, 2014

2014 South Carolina Book Festival

 The South Carolina Book Festival is South Carolina’s premier literary event.

May 15, 2014

Mapping Latino Musical Migrations

There are stories that run deeper than catchy lyrics might suggest. The instruments, the language, the style – even a song’s structure can show us how ideas and experiences are traded between diverse communities.

May 14, 2014

All Over This Land: American Regional Folk Music

Though society is becoming increasingly homogeneous, regional expressive variation still exists and reflects the strength of our cultural differences.

May 13, 2014

An Evening to Remember: With Holocaust Survivor Martin Lowenberg

As a child in Nazi Germany, Martin Lowenberg was deported to five different concentration camps and lost 28 family members, including his parents and siblings.

May 13, 2014

War & Society Roundtable Discussion

The War & Society Roundtable is a joint initiative of University of Southern Mississippi and the Library of Hattiesburg, Petal and Forrest County.    Each meeting focuses on a different book related to the history of war and society, which are made available to participants through the Library.

May 13, 2014

Women's Voices - Women's Lives in Yiddish Song

Program includes cradle songs that sing of social justice, songs of love and courtship, songs of bitter poverty, songs of triumph in the face of oppression and songs envisioning lasting peace.

May 13, 2014

Now What? – A Conversation on Equality and Education

This is the first installment of Now What? a five-part series of off-the-cuff conversations with some of the country's most interesting thinkers talking about today's front-page issues.

May 12, 2014

New Books, New Readers - Choosing Freedom

 New Books, New Readers is a humanities-based book discussion for adults who are new readers or who are working to improve their reading.

May 11, 2014

The Iroquois (Haudenosaunee) Influence on Women's Rights

Imagine that women had the right to choose all political representatives, and to remove from office anyone who didn't address the wishes and needs of the people.

May 10, 2014

Finding the Middle Way: A Story of the Hmong People in Portage County, 1980-present

Portage County Cultural Festival.

May 10, 2014

Created Equal: Walking Tour of Boston Black Heritage Trail

Focuses on the emerging free black community of the 1800s and their leading efforts in the Abolition Movement, the Underground Railroad, and the early struggles for equality and justice.

May 9, 2014

Shadows and Sounds: Memories from a Forgotten Neighborhood

Visitors are invited to delve into the history of the former West Elmwood neighborhood and current Huntington Industrial Park through an immersive sound installation. Organized activities will take place every half-hour, including a hands-on science demonstration, storytelling and a scavenger hunt.

May 8, 2014

Art of Glacier National Park

Glacier National Park has been a mecca for visual artists who have found much to appreciate in its natural and scenic beauty.

May 6, 2014

Now, That's Rural: Entrepreneurs and Innovators Who Shaped Kansas Communities

This presentation highlights real-world examples of rural entrepreneurs who have built businesses and created jobs and opportunities, changing the way Kansans work

May 6, 2014

A Day in the Life: Memoirs from the Middle East

A Day in the Life: Memoirs from the Middle East explores the diversity of daily life in the Middle East and seeks to dispel common stereotypes about the region.

May 5, 2014 to May 30, 2014

Vaquero: Genesis of the Texas Cowboy

In the early 1970s, Bill Wittliff visited a ranch in northern Mexico where the vaqueros still worked cattle in traditional ways. Wittliff photographed the vaqueros as they went about daily chores that had changed little since the first Mexican cowherders learned to work cattle from a horse's back.

May 5, 2014

"Where Have You Gone Joe Dimaggio," Jackie Robinson, and Hank Greenberg: Ethnic Heroes in Baseball's Melting Pot

As a means of illuminating America's racial and ethnic past, this lecture examines and compares an iconic baseball triumvirate: Jackie Robinson, Joe DiMaggio, and Hank Greenberg.

May 4, 2014

Rethinking the Puerto Rican Riots of 1974

Exhibit explores the series of disturbances and confrontations that took place between Newark’s Puerto Rican community and city police in 1974.

May 3, 2014

Take Shelter: Flint Hills Native Stone Subterranean Structures

A discussion about the historical context and rare beauty of native stone arched-roof cellars.

May 2, 2014

Gilded Age Psyches: An Epic of Victorians Run Wild

Drawing on original research, on-site photos and his Internet trilogy, Dr. Robert Spiegelman presents a multimedia tour-de-force of America's first Gilded Age that brims with present-day lessons.

May 1, 2014 to May 29, 2014

Annexation: Celebrating Texas Statehood

This Humanities Texas traveling exhibition narrates the story of Texas as a Mexican colony and Republic, its campaign to join the United States, the vote for annexation, and the consequences of that vote.

April 2014

April 28, 2014

Exploring Celtic Culture

 Experience traditional Irish music and step dance.

April 27, 2014

Buffalo Bill's Nebraska

Author Jeff Barnes tells the story of Cody in Nebraska, from his days as an Indian scout, as a hunting guide to the rich and famous, as the creator of “Buffalo Bill’s Wild West,” and his enduring legacy in the state, nation, and world today.

April 26, 2014 to August 17, 2014

American Spirits: The Rise and Fall of Prohibition

Step back in time to an era of flappers and suffragists, bootleggers and temperance lobbyists, and real-life legends like Al Capone and Carry Nation.

April 26, 2014

Sam Jones: Patriot of the Seminole Wars

New regional demographics, insightful cultural data and analysis answer questions long posed in this uniquely successful resistance movement orchestrated by one determined patriot against colonialism.

April 25, 2014 to April 26, 2014

Besa: The Promise

Never-before-told story of Albania – a small European country which opened its borders to shelter Jewish refugees, even as it endured a brutal Nazi occupation.

April 22, 2014

Father Edward J. Flanigan of Boys Town, Nebraska

The presentation will explore Father Flanagan’s views on racial and religious equality, and how they differed from accepted social norms of early 20th century America.

April 18, 2014

Babe Ruth: A Chautauqua performance by Frank Mullen Jr.

 The City of Las Vegas Office of Cultural Affairs presents Babe Ruth, whose power hitting built modern baseball.

April 18, 2014

This Week on BackStory - The Departed: Extinction in America

In this Earth Day episode of BackStory, our hosts explore how Americans have grappled with the idea of extinction over time, and what the loss of native species has meant for our ecosystems and everyday lives.

April 17, 2014

Charles Ball: A Living History Presentation

Charles Ball was a third-generation slave from Calvert County, Maryland who, after being sold to a trader in the deep South, escaped back to his home state.  Upon his return to Maryland, he acted as a free man and fought in the War of 1812 on behalf of the United States in Commodore Joshua Barney’s Chesapeake Flotilla.

April 17, 2014

A Banjo Pickin' Girl

Ola Belle Campbell Reed (1916-2002) was a strongly self-reliant housewife, mother and figure of the women's movement.  Reed grew up in the mountains of North Carolina, where she learned traditional music and an old banjo style from her elders. During the Depression her family moved to Pennsylvania, where she later began her career.

April 17, 2014 to April 19, 2014

12th Annual Southern Miss Powwow

The annual powwow brings together southeastern Native communities with local and university communities to experience a contemporary Native gathering, learn about Native traditions and gain better understanding of Mississippi's diverse cultures.

April 16, 2014

Campaign Songs of the 19th Century

The political campaigns of the past were fueled by song. Tunes like "Jefferson and Liberty," "Tippecanoe and Tyler Too," "Grover's Veto," and "You're All Right, Teddy" were sung with great gusto from porches and taverns across the land. They livened up street corners and torchlight parades. This program casts a unique look at how we got to know the candidates for political office in the days before mass media.

April 15, 2014

The American Arts and Crafts Movement in New York State

The American Arts and Crafts Movement, or "mission," gained popularity as a decorative style beginning in 1900, and by 1920 had gone out of style. Arts and Crafts, however, was more than simply a decorative style: it was also a philosophy, an ethos, a way of living, and significantly, an enormous business.

April 14, 2014

Clara Barton: Red Cross Angel, a Living History Presentation

Civil War heroine Clara Barton overcame both personal obstacles and society's narrow view of women's roles to pursue her heart's work: battlefield nursing.

April 13, 2014

Excess Baggage: Riding the Orphan Train

Real-life stories of the children who rode the Orphan Trains between the years 1854 and 1929.

April 12, 2014

‘Lilley Cornett: A Voice for the Forest.’

Kentucky Chautauqua performers travel throughout the state delivering to community organizations their historically accurate dramatizations of Kentuckians who made a difference.

April 11, 2014

Celebrating the Wild Side of Florida: Portals into Nature, Culture, and Sense of Place

Bill Belleville gives a compelling presentation on identifying our natural landscapes in Florida.  A Florida-based author and documentary filmmaker specializing in nature, conservation, and "sense of place."

April 10, 2014

Tree Army: The Civilian Conservation Corps in Washington State, 1933-1941

During the Great Depression, President Roosevelt created the Civilian Conservation Corps to provide jobs for millions of out-of-work men. But in doing so, he also saved an environment damaged by World War I activities and gave the country new trees, beautiful parks and recreational areas.

April 9, 2014

"To Be! Shakespeare Here and Now"

Shakespeare's work isn't recited, but performed by professional actor, stunt-person, improv artist and educator.

April 8, 2014

Walt Whitman and The Civil War: A Test of Poetry/A Vision of Democracy

Revisit and rediscover, through the language of Walt Whitman, “the real war [that] would never get in books.”

April 8, 2014

A Century of Fashion, 1870 - 1970

Teaching groups about the history of fashion from 1840 through 1980.

April 8, 2014

The Many Voices of Latino Literature

Discover the themes and motifs that give Latino literature its richness.

April 7, 2014

Pennsylvania German Music, Dance and Instruments

Through dance, songs and stories, audiences explore the traditions of Pennsylvania German music and dance.

April 5, 2014

Analog Days: How Technology Changed Our Culture

Those of us born before 1980 increasingly cannot recognize the world around us. Our rapid adoption of computers, the Internet and mobile devices has transformed the way we communicate.

April 5, 2014

Footsteps to Freedom: From Jim Crow to Civil Rights

This chautauqua program explores the history of the civil rights movement through the lives of two powerful women: Rosa Parks and Coretta Scott King.

April 4, 2014

American Chronicles: The Art of Norman Rockwell

Exhibition tracing the evolution of Rockwell’s art and iconography throughout his career.

April 3, 2014

St. Augustine's Unseen Heritage: The Archaeology of Early Colonial Life in America's Oldest European Community

 St. Augustine's archaeological heritage is unparalleled in the quantity and diversity of remains buried beneath its buildings, streets and backyards.

April 2, 2014

"Brother Can You Spare a Dime?"

Among the marks left on our nation by the Great Depression of the “Dirty Thirties” was a kind of “gallows humor,” a sense that we could keep from crying if we could just keep laughing.

April 1, 2014 to April 30, 2014

The Dust Bowl

The Dust Bowl.  In the 1930s, photographers working for the Farm Security Administration (FSA) captured unforgettable images of human fortitude and despair in the face of calamity.

April 1, 2014

A Day in the Life: Memoirs from the Middle East Book Club: I Shall Not Hate

The book club series explores the diversity of daily life in the Middle east and seeks to dispel common stereotypes about the region

April 1, 2014 to May 1, 2014

Anne Frank - A History for Today

The story of Anne Frank against the background of the Holocaust and the Second World War.

March 2014

March 29, 2014

"Imagining War": Making Sense of the American Civil War

“Imaging War”: Harpers Weekly and the work of war correspondent sketch artists will be discussed by Monocacy National Battlefield ranger Tracy Evans.

March 29, 2014

Music of the Civil War Era

Join Dr. David Hildebrand for a musical survey full of familiar tunes with the fascinating stories behind them -- from John Brown's Harper's Ferry raid to "The Bonnie White Flag." Appearing in period costume, Dr. Hildebrand will perform musical selections of the time accompanied by guitar, banjo, flute and voice.

March 29, 2014

Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities 2014 Humanist of the Year: Walter Isaacson

Each year, the Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities (LEH) honors Louisianians who have made outstanding contributions to the study and understanding of the humanities.

March 26, 2014 to March 28, 2014

21st Oxford Conference for the Book

The annual conference, which convenes fiction and non-fiction writers, journalists, poets, publishers, teachers, students and literacy advocates for three days of readings, lectures, panels, workshops and social events celebrating the written word, takes place on the University of Mississippi campus and at various off-campus venues in Oxford, MS.

March 24, 2014 to April 18, 2014

Crossroads of Empire: Early Printed Maps of the American Southwest

The traveling exhibition spans the mapmaking enterprise, beginning with the earliest known map to show the Texas edge of the Gulf (1512) and ending with an 1873 map of Texas showing the right of way granted to railroads.

March 23, 2014

BESA: The Promise

BESA: The Promise is the never-before-told story of Albania – a small European country which opened its borders to shelter Jewish refugees, even as it endured a brutal Nazi occupation.

March 22, 2014

An Immigrant's Struggles: The Diary of Irish American Mim Walsh

This illustrated presentation will introduce audiences to the lively “voice” of diarist Mim Walsh.

March 22, 2014 to May 4, 2014

Hometown Teams: How Sports Shape America (Traveling Smithsonian Exhibition)

Each weekend, hundreds of thousands of Americans participate in some sport, on some level. We win and we lose, and we yearn to play another day. And if we’re not playing, we’re watching: in the stands, on the fields with our sons and daughters, or in our living rooms with friends in front of a television.

March 19, 2014

"Voices of the Indiantown"

Documentary film which tells the history of the African American families who sharecropped in Dorchester County, Maryland.

March 19, 2014 to March 21, 2014

AMERICAN CIVIL WARS - The Entangled Histories of the United States, Latin America, and Europe in the 1860s

This conference will bring together leading specialists of various areas to reinterpret the quintessentially American conflict between North and South as part of an international web of war, imperialism, revolution, and emancipation that enveloped the Atlantic world in the 1860s.

March 15, 2014

Exploring the life and the legacy of Emilie Blackmore Stapp (1876-1962)

An American children's author and philanthropist whose writing career spanned more than 50 years.

March 14, 2014

Beehive Archive - all of the history & none of the dust!

Tune in for the Beehive Archive, a two-minute look at some of the most pivotal and peculiar events in Utah.

March 13, 2014

America's Nine First Ladies From New York State

Of America's 46 First Ladies, nine were born in New York State. This illustrated lecture explores the lives and legacies of these women, each with a different, fascinating tale to tell.

March 13, 2014

Japanese Film Festival: "The Tokyo Story" and the Japanese Aesthetic of Simplicity

The Tokyo Story will be screened, and scholar Dr. David Larson will speak about "The Japanese Aesthetic of Simplicity."

March 12, 2014

Created Equal: The Abolitionists & Slavery by Another Name

The Abolitionists brings to life the struggles of the men and women who led the battle to end slavery.

March 11, 2014

Battle of Antietam and Clara Barton

A discussion of the work Clara Barton performed on the Antietam Battlefield.

March 7, 2014 to April 23, 2014

Faces and Places of the Chihuahuan Desert

Covering over 140,000 square miles, the Chihuahuan Desert is considered the largest in North America.

March 6, 2014

Common Threads: Adirondack Quilts Tell Their Stories

These patchwork quilts record the hardships of life in the Adirondacks among close-knit families and communities, as well as the influence of a wild natural beauty.

March 5, 2014 to May 26, 2014

American Chronicles: The Art of Norman Rockwell

Exhibition tracing the evolution of Rockwell’s art.

March 4, 2014

What Makes a Memory?

Humanities based book discussion.

March 3, 2014

Petticoat Patriot: A Woman in the Continental Army

 Joan Gatturna presents this living history program on Deborah Sampson, a patriot who left her petticoats behind.

March 2, 2014 to May 26, 2014

Treasures from Korea: Arts and Culture of the Joseon Dynasty, 1392-1910

An exhibit of more than a hundred fifty works drawn primarily from the National Museum of Korea dazzles with paintings, scultpture, and decorative arts

March 1, 2014

Family Adventures in Reading

A humanities-based family reading program.

March 1, 2014

Treasure from the Isles of Shoals: How New Archaeology is Changing Old History

 There is treasure here but not the pirate kind. Scientific "digs" on Smuttynose Island are changing New England history.

February 2014

February 28, 2014

All Different Kinds of Free and Prigg v. Pennsylvania: Slavery, the Supreme Court and the Ambivalent Constitution

Book discussion focusing on Jessica Mccann's historical novel about the heart-breaking story of Margaret Morgan, kidnapped from her home in Pennsylvania in 1837 and sold into slavery.

February 28, 2014

This Week on BackStory - The 2014 Oscars Show

BackStory explores how Hollywood takes on history and the stories the film industry chooses to tell.

February 27, 2014

On Hemingway: Three Views

This chautauqua program examines the author of machismo, from a woman's point of view.

February 27, 2014

Created Equal: The Abolitionists Discussion

Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle is made possible through a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, as part of its Bridging Cultures initiative, in partnership with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History.

February 26, 2014

The Spirit of Motown

The sounds Motown created bridged racial divides and produced more number one hits than the Beach Boys, the Rolling Stones, Elvis, and The Beatles combined. Experience the sounds of Motown and discover the story behind the legend.

February 26, 2014

Road to the Promised Land

The Civil Rights Movement from 1954 to the 1980s changed the face of the nation, laying the groundwork for crusades by other minorities to claim their rights. The efforts to achieve equality produced a revolutionary social impact.

February 26, 2014

The Loving Story screening - NYU DC

February 25, 2014

Let’s Talk About Preserving African-American Historic Sites

Discussion about the many African American sites that exist, explaining what comprises an historic site and what can be done to preserve them.

February 24, 2014

The Harriet Tubman Living History Experience

The most famous conductor of the Underground Railroad, Harriet Tubman helped thousands of enslaved Africans to escape to freedom.

February 23, 2014

Healing African Dance

In this engaging presentation, choreographer, storyteller and former Fulbright Scholar Angela Watson explores one of the most essential elements of African dance—its ability to heal.

February 22, 2014

500 Years of Coastal Culture along the St. Johns River: 1513-2013

"500 Years of Coastal Culture along the St. Johns River: 1513-2013"

February 22, 2014

African American Children's Authors

Stories written by black authors take us to many intriguing places and introduce us to unforgettable characters such as talking animals and trickster heroes and heroines.

February 21, 2014

Homegrown Heroes: Pennsylvania Communities in the Civil War

Remarkable true stories of the Civil War as experienced by civilians who found themselves in harm's way. How did the ideas and concerns that matter to them play out in Gettysburg, along the Underground Railroad and throughout the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania?

February 21, 2014

BackStory with the American History Guys - On The Money: A History of American Currency

This week's BackStory unpacks America's relationship with money, exploring the transformations of currency over the centuries.

February 20, 2014 to February 23, 2014

60 Years and Counting: Voices of the Civil Rights Movement

The Natchez Literary and Cinema Celebration takes place 50 years after the United States Congress passed the Civil Rights Act, which prohibited discrimination in public places.

February 19, 2014

CREATED EQUAL FILM SERIES

Created Equal Film Series.  "The Loving Story"

February 18, 2014

Created Equal: America's Civil Rights Struggle

The Abolitionists vividly brings to life the struggles of the men and women who led the battle to end slavery. The film’s release in 2013 also marked the 150th anniversary year of the Emancipation Proclamation.

February 18, 2014

Congressional Staff Webinar: NEH April/May Grant Deadlines

We encourage you to share information with your constituents about upcoming NEH grant deadlines.

February 17, 2014

Stories From the Other Side of the Tracks

Oral history project to record the stories South Hoisington, Kansas, a predominately African-American community established by the railroad in Barton County.

February 16, 2014

Mary Todd Lincoln, The First "First Lady"

Mary Todd Lincoln, The First "First Lady."

Idaho Humanities Council Speaker's Bureau event - Speaker:  Janet Worthington

February 15, 2014

Zora Neale Hurston: A Little Sweat and a Lot of Spunk

Connect with Zora Neale Hurston, the famous African American novelist and folklorist from Florida, when Dr. Lynn Hawkins presents an enactment of Hurston's 1928 story entitled "Sweat."

February 14, 2014

Road to the Promised Land: The Civil Rights Movement

Traveling exhibition surveys the Civil Rights Movement from the emergence of Martin Luther King Jr. in the Montgomery bus boycott of 1955 through the 1990s.

February 13, 2014

How Shipwrecks Shaped the Destiny of the Outer Banks

Road Scholars: Kevin Duffus - How Shipwrecks Shaped the Destiny of the Outer Banks.

February 13, 2014

Exhibition and Film Screening of "The Freedom Riders"

Join the Rebekah Jacob Gallery for a special, one night only, exhibition at NYU Washington, DC -- a special screening of FREEDOM RIDERS will follow.

February 13, 2014

Lessons from Lincoln

This conversation, led by independent scholar and Lincoln expert Richard Etulain, will look at what today’s leaders might learn from Lincoln’s handling of slavery, emancipation and civil rights, political patronage, and reconstruction during the Civil War era.

February 12, 2014

Team of Rivals: The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln by Doris Kearns Goodwin

Book discussion that explores Doris Kearns Goodwin's book, "Team of Rivals," a biographical portrait of President Abraham Lincoln and the men who served in his cabinet from 1861 to 1865. Following the discussion, the public is invited to view Steven Spielburg's 2012 film, "Lincoln," which was derived from Goodwin's book.

February 11, 2014

Western Africa Before the Boats

The exhibit explores what life was like in Africa before the slave trade began, approximately 1500-1650 AD.

February 10, 2014

African American Women Domestics: The Story of Two Kansans

Growing up in rural Nicodemus, Kansas, in the large Williams family, Ernestine and Charlesetta learned basic cleaning and cooking skills from their mother and grandmother who had been enslaved in Kentucky by the family of Vice President Richard M. Johnson.

February 9, 2014

Fourteenth Annual Frederick Douglass Community Read-a-Thon

This event is being held in celebration of African American History Month and honors Douglass as one of the great men of the 19th century, an early advocate for African American civil rights and the rights of women

February 8, 2014

Francisco Menendez: African Slave to Freedom Fighter

Brought to the British colonies as a slave, Francisco Menendez escaped his servitude and fled to Spanish Florida.

February 8, 2014 to May 4, 2014

The 1968 Exhibit

Revisit the extraordinary events of 1968

February 8, 2014

Documentary Film - BESA: The Promise

This documentary records the bravery and compassion of the Albanian citizens who rescued Jews during the Holocaust.

February 8, 2014

A Look at Mande (West African) Culture through Traditional Music

The discussion examines the influence of West Africa on American culture and why the djembe was outlawed during slavery. Participants will learn about the djembe, its introduction by drummers like Babatunde Olatunji in 1950 and Ladji Camara from Guinea, and how it spread throughout America.

February 7, 2014 to March 6, 2014

The Dust Bowl

In the 1930s, photographers working for the Farm Security Administration (FSA) captured unforgettable images of human fortitude and despair in the face of calamity.

February 7, 2014

Film Screening: Slavery By Another Name

Slavery by Another Name challenges one of our country’s most cherished assumptions: the belief that slavery ended with Abraham Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation of 1863.

February 6, 2014

Chocolate: Food of the Gods

Chocolate: Food of the Gods.  Money doesn't grow on trees, but chocolate does!

February 6, 2014

“Ask an Expert” Documentaries

Laurie Kahn, film director/producer, will lead the NEH Google+ Hangout on Documentaries, using her NEH-support film A Midwife’s Tale, based on the diary of an 18th century midwife, as an example.

February 6, 2014

Stories From the Underground Railroad

This presentation is part art exhibition, part history, and part decoding of the secrets behind the quilt patches that are synonymous with the Underground Railroad.

February 5, 2014

Folksongs in the Land of Lincoln

Goin' Down to Cairo: Folksongs in the Land of Lincoln.  A Road Scholar Program by Bucky Halker

February 5, 2014

National Youth Summit: Freedom Summer

Students across the country will join together for a virtual National Youth Summit on Freedom Summer and civic engagement

February 5, 2014

Forging Faith, Building Freedom: African American Faith Experiences in Delaware, 1800-1980

Two hundred years ago, in 1813, Peter Spencer founded the African Union Church, the first independent black denomination in the United States. The next year, he started the August Quarterly, the nation’s oldest African American festival.

February 4, 2014

Jump at de Sun: Bringing Southern Folklore to Life

Chatauqua scholars Bob Devin Jones and Phyllis McEwen will present Zora Neale Hurston during the Harlem Renaissance.

February 4, 2014

"The Civil War and the Women's Movement"

Winter History Festival -"The Civil War and the Women's Movement."   John and Karen Devries will talk about the war and its culmination and aftermath.

February 3, 2014 to March 30, 2014

Citizens at Last: The Woman Suffrage Movement in Texas

Created to celebrate the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment.

February 3, 2014

Highlighting the Legacy: African-Americans in Mississippi

The presentation explores the intracultural experiences of Mississippi African Americans which helped produce successful educators, entrepreneurs, Civil Rights leaders, physicians, attorneys and parents.

February 2, 2014 to February 2, 2014

Hal Chase: Outside In: African American History in Iowa

Speakers Bureau

Hal Chase: Outside In: African American History in Iowa.

February 2, 2014

African American History in Iowa

The program is a 15 minute audio-visual survey of the major people, organizations, and events in Iowa's African-America​n history from its territorial beginning in 1838 to the present.

February 1, 2014 to February 28, 2014

Road to the Promised Land: Martin Luther King Jr. and the Civil Rights Movement

Exhibition featuring photographs, facsimiles of landmark documents, and quotations by Dr. King and others engaged in the struggle for civil rights.

January 2014

January 30, 2014

“Ask an Expert” Exhibitions

Brian Horrigan, Exhibit Curator, Minnesota Historical Society will lead the NEH Google+ Hangout on Exhibitions, sharing a behind-the-scenes look at his work putting together the NEH-supported exhibition The 1968 Exhibit.

January 29, 2014

Goin' Down to Cairo: Folksongs in the Land of Lincoln

Goin' Down to Cairo: Folksongs in the Land of Lincoln

A Road Scholar Program by Bucky Halker

January 28, 2014

Growing Up in the 1950s: The Hopes and Frustrations of a Prosperous Age

A presentation on the conflicting currents of the 1950s

January 28, 2014

"Ask an Expert" Websites

Louise Lippincott, Chief Curator of Fine Arts, Carnegie Museum of Art will lead the NEH Google+ Hangout on Websites, presenting on her experiences building the website and online archive for the NEH-supported exhibition Teenie Harris, Photographer: An American Story.

January 25, 2014

Toward One Oregon

Oregon Humanities Conversation Project

Toward One Oregon: Bridging Oregon’s Urban and Rural Communities by Michael Hibbard, Ethan Seltzer, and Bruce Weber.

January 22, 2014

Armed with Our Language, We Went to War: the Navajo Code Talkers with Laura Tohe

During WWII a small group of Navajo men from the Navajo homeland enlisted in the Marines with a unique armor.  This select group of men devised a code using the Diné (Navajo) language to pass secret information without the enemy ever deciphering or breaking the code.

January 20, 2014

Susan B. Anthony, the Invincible!

Susan B. Anthony, the Invincible!  Arrested, tried and convicted for voting in the 1872 presidential election, Miss Anthony became the symbol of the struggle for women's suffrage.

January 18, 2014

San Angelo History Harvest

San Angelo History Harvest.

January 15, 2014 to January 15, 2014

Amelia Earhart: Dreams Take Flight, a Living History Presentation

Amelia Earhart: Dreams Take Flight, a Living History Presentation. Amelia Earhart was much more than a courageous aviatrix.

January 14, 2014 to May 13, 2014

War & Society Roundtable Discussion

War & Society Roundtable Discussion.  The Mississippi Humanities Council has awarded a grant to the University of Southern Mississippi to expand its War & Society Roundtable to a wi

January 13, 2014

Telling Time in Ancient North America

An Illinois Humanities Council Road Scholars Speakers Bureau program on timekeeping methods employed by ancient civilizations in North America

January 13, 2014

Local and Legendary: Maine in the Civil War

Local and Legendary: Maine in the Civil War - Who Were the Zuoaves?—Robert “Maynard” Kufrovich

January 13, 2014

The Underground Railroad in Quilts?

Commonwealth Speakers Program

January 13, 2014 to March 7, 2014

Fact, Fiction, and the New World: The Role of Books in the Making of America

The availability of books and the spread of literacy profoundly influenced the discovery of the New World

January 12, 2014

Art & Chautauqua | Rising to the Occasion

Art & Chautauqua | Rising to the Occasion, a discussion.

January 9, 2014 to February 6, 2014

“Across the Divide”

Exhibition of works by Chinese artists and accompanying symposium on the role art plays in representing cultural identities

January 5, 2014

The 2014 Bismarck State College BookTalk - “Light a Fire Within”

The 2014 Bismarck State College BookTalk. This year’s theme is “Light a Fire Within” and will discuss three outstanding books about books.

January 3, 2014

Heaven on Earth: A History of American Utopias

This Week on BackStory - Heaven on Earth: A History of American Utopias.

January 1, 2014 to December 31, 2014

Depots of Iowa: The James H. Andrew Railroad Museum & History Center

December 2013

December 19, 2013

People, Purpose, and Place: Agrarian Novels in the USA

Book discussion series in which participants will explore the interconnectedness of their lives through agrarian novels that provide insight into the human ecosystem.

December 13, 2013 to December 15, 2013

Phoenix Festival of the Arts

The Arizona Humanities Council and the Phoenix Center for the Arts present the second Phoenix Festival of the Arts

December 13, 2013

Vestiges of the War of 1812

Most Marylanders know that during the War of 1812 Francis Scott Key, inspired by the bombardment of Fort McHenry, wrote the lyrics to a song that later became our national anthem.

December 12, 2013

Key Moments in American Musical Theatre History

The evolution of the American musical

December 11, 2013

NEH Google+ Hangout on Digital Humanities

Watch a live interview with University of Richmond President Dr. Edward L. Ayers and his colleagues in the University of Richmond’s Digital Scholarship Lab.

December 6, 2013 to January 4, 2014

Museum on Main Street - New Harmonies: Celebrating American Roots Music

Museum on Main Street is a cultural project that serves rural America.

December 4, 2013

Standing Down: From Warrior to Civilian

A launch event for Standing Down, an NEH-funded anthology of writings by and about those who have served in the military

November 2013

November 25, 2013 to December 22, 2013

A State Divided: The Civil War in Missouri

A State Divided: The Civil War in Missouri is a joint project of the Missouri History Museum and the Missouri Humanities Council.

November 22, 2013

BackStory with the American History Guys

BackStory takes a look at conspiracy thinking throughout American history.

November 11, 2013

Veterans' Voices

Texas Veterans' Voices and Humanities Texas invite veterans, their loved ones, and the public to participate in group readings of classical texts on Veterans Day.

November 8, 2013 to January 5, 2014

Preserving the Iraqi Jewish Archive

Recovered records of the once vibrant Jewish life in Iraq

October 2013

November 19, 2013 to November 26, 2013

The African Americans: Many Rivers To Cross

Six-part documentary chronicles the full sweep of African-American history, from the origins of slavery on the African continent through more than four centuries of remarkable historic events up to the present day.

November 12, 2013 to November 26, 2013

The African Americans: Many Rivers To Cross

Six-part documentary chronicles the full sweep of African-American history, from the origins of slavery on the African continent through more than four centuries of remarkable historic events up to the present day.

November 5, 2013 to November 26, 2013

The African Americans: Many Rivers To Cross

Six-part documentary chronicles the full sweep of African-American history, from the origins of slavery on the African continent through more than four centuries of remarkable historic events up to the present day.

October 30, 2013 to October 30, 2014

Marshall Field and Selfridge

Beyond breaking new ground in retail, both Field and Selfridge inspired social change. For example, their popularized slogan "give the lady what she wants" helped women gain the freedom to shop and socialize without their husbands. Moreover, their "Bargain Basement" de-stratified economic classes in retail, providing high-quality merchandise at an affordable price.

October 29, 2013 to November 26, 2013

The African Americans: Many Rivers To Cross

Six-part documentary chronicles the full sweep of African-American history, from the origins of slavery on the African continent through more than four centuries of remarkable historic events up to the present day.

October 22, 2013 to November 26, 2013

The African Americans: Many Rivers To Cross

Six-part documentary chronicles the full sweep of African-American history, from the origins of slavery on the African continent through more than four centuries of remarkable historic events up to the present day.

October 18, 2013

American Spirit: A History of the Supernatural [rebroadcast]

BackStory explores the ways in which witches, spirits and ghosts have haunted our history.

October 15, 2013

Superheroes: A Never-Ending Battle

The first documentary to examine the evolution of the heroes who leapt from the pages of comic books over the last 75 years, this three-part miniseries chronicles how disposable diversions that once cost a dime became the foundation for a multi-billion-dollar industry from 1938 to 2010.

October 8, 2013

Coming Home: A Book Group for Combat Veterans

Veteran Programming.  The group will read a modern translation of The Odyssey, the timeless story of challenges faced by a Soldier returning home from the war.

October 2, 2013 to November 15, 2013

Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War

Traveling exhibition examines how President Lincoln used the Constitution to confront three intertwined crises of the Civil War—the secession of Southern states, slavery and wartime civil liberties.

October 2, 2013

Arizona is for Art Lovers: Museums, Murals, and Movements Through the Ages

If requested, audience members can create a unique collage inspired by themes from Arizona’s art history.

September 2013

October 1, 2013 to October 1, 2013

Latino Americans

The first major television documentary series to chronicle the rich and varied history of Latinos, who have for the past 500-plus years helped shape what is today the United States and have become the country’s largest minority group.

September 29, 2013 to October 1, 2014

edUi 2014 Conference

edUi offers a rare lineup of speakers, including top web innovators that will inspire and enlighten web designers, developers, managers, and user experience and interaction design professions from any industry.

September 24, 2013 to October 1, 2013

Latino Americans

The first major television documentary series to chronicle the rich and varied history of Latinos, who have for the past 500-plus years helped shape what is today the United States and have become the country’s largest minority group.

September 17, 2013 to October 1, 2013

Latino Americans

The first major television documentary series to chronicle the rich and varied history of Latinos, who have for the past 500-plus years helped shape what is today the United States and have become the country’s largest minority group.

September 6, 2013 to October 2, 2013

Crossing Cultures: the Art of Manga in Hawai'i

Exhibition supported by the Hawai’i Council for the Humanities brings together seven Hawai‘i-produced manga and explores the varied cross-cultural sources that influenced the narratives and artistic styles of these works.

August 2013

August 28, 2013 to August 28, 2013

March on Washington Anniversary Bell Ringing

Bell ringing across the nation and around the world marks fiftieth anniversary of Martin Luther King Jr.'s  speech, "Let Freedom Ring." 

August 23, 2013

James Baldwin: The Price of the Ticket

The life, works and beliefs of the late writer and civil rights activist James Baldwin

June 2013

June 18, 2013

Henry Ford

A profile of the farm boy who became the 20th century’s most influential American innovator.

June 16, 2013 to September 8, 2013

Wari: Lords of the Ancient Andes

Between 600 and 1000, the Wari forged a complex society widely regarded today as ancient Peru’s first empire.

June 14, 2013 to September 2, 2013

The 1968 Exhibit

Revisit 1968 at the National Constitution Center

June 12, 2013 to August 16, 2013

Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War

This traveling exhibition examines how President Lincoln used the Constitution to confront three intertwined crises of the Civil War—the secession of Southern states, slavery and wartime civil liberties.

May 2013

May 29, 2013 to July 12, 2013

Manifold Greatness: The Creation and Afterlife of the King James Bible

Traveling exhibit on the dramatic history of the King James Bible, what we know about the scholars who translated it, and how it has continued to influence literature, culture, and society for over 400 years.

May 27, 2013

Veterans' Voices

Humanities Texas and Texas Veterans Voices host Memorial Day readings of ancient Greek texts

May 24, 2013 to July 6, 2013

The Way We Worked

May 24, 2013

From the Blue Ridge to the Rocky Mountains: Thomas Wolfe and the American West

Public lecture on one of America’s most renowned writers of the early twentieth century

May 21, 2013

CONSTITUTION USA with Peter Sagal

Does the Constitution have what it takes to keep up with modern America? Join Peter Sagal, host of NPR’s Wait Wait… Don’t Tell Me! as he hits the road to find out. Traveling across the country by motorcycle, Sagal is in search of where the U.S. Constitution lives, how it works and how it doesn’t… how it unites us as a nation and how it has nearly torn us apart.

May 19, 2013 to October 27, 2013

Free & Safe: The Underground Railroad in Vermont

A new exhibit at Rokeby Museum, a National Historic Landmark and Underground Railroad site, traces the journey of two fugitive slaves from slavery to freedom.

May 17, 2013

Patent Pending: A History of Intellectual Property

BackStory Radio examines the history of intellectual property in America

May 14, 2013

Annie Oakley

The story of the five-foot sharpshooter who never missed a shot.

May 1, 2013

Frost and Wordsworth: Romantic Poetry in the Light of Common Day

Vermont Poet Laureate Sydney Lea explores Wordsworth and Frost's similarities, differences, and influences on other poets.

April 2013

April 29, 2013 to May 1, 2014

The Moton School Story: Children of Courage

New Civil Rights exhibition explores origin and aftermath of ‘Brown v. Board’
April 27, 2013 to September 2, 2013

Designing Tomorrow: America's World's Fairs of the 1930s

Designing Tomorrow: America's World's Fairs of the 1930s showcases six Depression-era expositions that brought visions of a brighter future to tens of millions of Americans.

April 19, 2013

Connecticut Center for the Book Launch

Join Connecticut Humanities and special guest The Honorable John Larson (D-1st District) to celebrate the launch of the new Connecticut Center for the Book at Connecticut Humanities.

March 2013

March 20, 2013 to March 24, 2013

Virginia Festival of the Book

The Virginia Festival of the Book is a 5-day festival of mostly free literary events that are open to the public as we honor book culture and promote reading and literacy.

March 18, 2013

Have You Heard From Johannesburg?

This five-part series chronicles the unprecedented international movement of citizen activists who fought for three decades to bring down the brutal, racist system of apartheid in South Africa when their governments would not.

March 16, 2013 to January 20, 2014

Palaces for the People: Guastavino and America’s Great Public Spaces

The architectural legacy of Rafael Guastavino Sr. (1842-1908), arguably the most influential architectural craftsman working in late-nineteenth and early-twentieth-century America.

March 15, 2013

Woody Guthrie: Ain't Got No Home

Hear the story of Woodie Guthrie’s creative energy, personal imperfections and family tragedy.

March 12, 2013

The Storm That Swept Mexico

The Storm That Swept Mexico tells the epic story of the Mexican Revolution of 1910.

March 11, 2013

Have You Heard From Johannesburg?

This five-part series chronicles the unprecedented international movement of citizen activists who fought for three decades to bring down the brutal, racist system of apartheid in South Africa when their governments would not.

March 8, 2013 to March 9, 2013

Winter Weekend 2013: Great Expectations by Charles Dickens

Maine Humanities Council hosts Winter Weekend, a humanities experience that brings together historians, writers, artists, public intellectuals, and others for a weekend of discussion of Dickens' Great Expectations.

March 1, 2013

MYSTERY! A Conversation with David Lindsey and Archer Mayor

Humanities Texas and the Harry Ransom Center will present MYSTERY! a conversation with two New York Times bestselling mystery authors David Lindsey and Archer Mayor, moderated by Karen Olsson, author of Waterloo and a contributing editor for Texas Monthly.

February 2013

February 22, 2013

Slavery By Another Name

Documentary explores the little-known story of the post-Emancipation era and the labor practices and laws that effectively created a new form of slavery in the South that persisted well into the 20th century.

February 20, 2013 to April 5, 2013

Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War

Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War, a traveling exhibition, examines how President Abraham Lincoln used the Constitution to confront three intertwined crises of the Civil War – the secession of Southern states, slavery, and wartime civil liberties.

February 16, 2013 to June 9, 2013

Revealing the African Presence in Renaissance Europe

An exhibition exploring the presence of Africans and their descendants in Europe from the late 1400s to the early 1600s and the roles these individuals played in society as reflected in art.

February 10, 2013 to May 19, 2013

Wari: Pre-Inca Lords of Peru

Wari’s capital is one of the largest archaeological sites in South America. From AD 600 and 1000, its denizens created an exhilarating episode in the history of the Americas by forging a society now widely regarded as one of the western hemisphere’s first empires.

 

February 8, 2013

For All the World to Hear: Stories from the Struggle for Civil Rights

For All the World to Hear: Stories from the Struggle for Civil Rights, an oral history performance project supported by the Maryland Humanities Council, brings ten Baltimore-area senior ci

February 3, 2013

18th-Annual Langston Hughes Community Poetry Reading

Langston Hughes' poems, dating from the Harlem Renaissance through the 1960's, continue to resonate today.  These powerful, poignant and often amusing works are read aloud by members o

February 2, 2013 to April 28, 2013

1968: The Year that Rocked America

The social forces that swirled through the turbulent 1960s crested in 1968. It was a turning point for a generation coming of age and a nation at war.
February 2, 2013 to February 22, 2013

Manifold Greatness: The Creation and Afterlife of the King James Bible

Manifold Greatness: The Creation and Afterlife of the King James Bible celebrates the 400th anniversary of the first printing of the King James Bible in 1611 and examines its fascinating and complex history.

February 2, 2013 to April 14, 2013

Carnaval!

The sights and sounds of Carnaval in New Orleans, Mexico, Bolivia, Brazil, Trinidad, Italy, Spain, and Switzerland.

January 2013

January 31, 2013

Film Premiere of Strokes of Justice: the Simmie Knox Story

Join the Delaware Humanities Forum for the premiere of Strokes of Justice: the Simmie Knox Story about the life and work of artist Simmie Knox and meet the artist at a reception following the film screening.

January 30, 2013

Freedom Riders

Find inspiration in the story of a courageous band of young civil-rights activists who journeyed through the Deep South in 1961.

January 25, 2013 to February 8, 2013

Shakespeare Uncovered

Six episodes combine history, biography, iconic performances, new analysis and the personal passion of its celebrated hosts to tell the story behind the stories of Shakespeare’s greatest plays.

January 24, 2013 to May 24, 2013

Teenie Harris, Photographer: An American Story

A groundbreaking retrospective of the works of African American photographer Charles "Teenie" Harris (1908-1998)

January 18, 2013 to February 28, 2013

Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War

Traveling exhibition explores how Lincoln used the Constitution to confront three intertwined crises of the war—the secession of Southern states, slavery, and wartime civil liberties.

January 12, 2013

“New Harmonies” exhibit tour closes with a symphony concert in South Dakota

To close out the Museum on Main Street tour of “New Harmonies: Celebrating American Roots Music” in South Dakota, the South Dakota Symphony Orchestra will perform the world premiere of

January 8, 2013 to January 22, 2012

The Abolitionists

Radicals. Agitators. Troublemakers. Liberators. Called by many names, the abolitionists tore the nation apart in order to make a more perfect union.

January 6, 2013

Besa: The Promise

Documentary on the little-known story of the Albanian Muslims who took Jews into their homes during WWII and saved thousands of lives.

December 2012

December 28, 2012

Best of the Best of the New BackStory

As 2012 winds down, and a New Year is born, American History Guys Brian, Ed, and Peter reflect on their first weekly season, reprising favorite interviews, riffs, features, and calls.
December 26, 2012 to January 24, 2013

Freedom Riders

Freedom Riders looks at six months in 1961 when more than 400 courageous Americans - old and young, black and white, men and women, Northern and Southern - risked their lives to challenge segregated facilities in the South.

December 21, 2012

Naughty & Nice: A History of the Holiday Season

The Puritans banned Christmas, once a time of rowdiness when the poor demanded food from the rich.

December 17, 2012

The Central Park Five: Film Screening and Discussion with Ken Burns

Ken Burns will screen and discuss his new documentary on the Central Park jogger case in an event sponsored by the New Hampshire Humanities Council and New Hampshire Public Television.

December 14, 2012

Apocalypse Now & Then: End Times in America

BackStory Radio examines how apocalyptic visions gain traction from time to time, and what they tell us about American hopes and fears through the centuries.

December 12, 2012 to February 8, 2013

Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War

Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War explores how Lincoln used the Constitution to confront three intertwined crises of the war—the secession of Southern states, slavery, and wartime civil liberties.

December 10, 2012 to February 2, 2013

From Morning to Night: Domestic Service in the Gilded Age South

The traveling exhibit examines the role of African Americans in domestic service in the South.

December 10, 2012 to December 16, 2012

The Loving Story

This Oscar-shortlisted film is the definitive account of the landmark 1967 Supreme Court decision that legalized interracial marriage: Loving v. Virginia.

December 7, 2012

Paris: The Luminous Years

In the early decades of the Twentieth Century, a storm of modernism swept through the art worlds of the West, uprooting centuries of tradition in the visual arts, music, literature, dance, theater and beyond.

December 7, 2012

You've Got Mail: A History of the Post Office

BackStory Radio looks at the history of the U.S. Postal Service

November 2012

November 27, 2012

The War of 1812

For two and a half years, Americans fought against the British, Canadian colonists and native nations. The War of 1812 presents the conflict that forged the destiny of a continent.

November 18, 2012 to November 19, 2012

The Dust Bowl

The Dust Bowl, by filmmaker Ken Burns, chronicles the worst man-made ecological disaster in American history.

November 17, 2012

Constitutionally Speaking -The Conversation Continues: How Does the Constitution Keep Up with the Times?

Nine constitutional scholars and authors share their perspectives in 15-minute TED-x style talks.

November 16, 2012

Straight Shot: A History of Gun Ownership

The American History Guys explore the history of guns in America

November 15, 2012 to March 10, 2013

For All The World To See: Visual Culture and the Struggle for Civil Rights

For All The World To See is the first comprehensive museum exhibition to explore the historic role played by visual image

November 11, 2012

Veterans Reclaim Armistice Day: Healing through the Humanities

Veterans, their families, and the community are invited to just listen or to tell their stories through visual art, performance, and the written word.

November 10, 2012 to December 19, 2012

Pride and Passion: The African-American Baseball Experience

A traveling exhibition examining the challenges faced by African-American baseball players as they sought equal opportunities in their sport begining in the post-Civil War era.

November 7, 2012 to November 11, 2012

Wisconsin Book Festival

The Wisconsin Book Festival is a free, five-day program of public events that takes place every fall in downtown Madison, WI.

November 3, 2012

Arizona Humanities Festival

The Arizona Humanities Festival is a vibrant celebration of the humanities that engages the imagination, explores ideas, and excites people to learn more about the world we share.

November 3, 2012

Mind the Gap: Economic Inequality and Our Democracy

Do increasing economic divisions threaten the survival of our democratic institutions? What are the causes of increasing economic inequality in America?

November 2, 2012

Pulling the Curtain: Voting in America

BackStory Radio looks at the history of voting in America.

October 2012

October 28, 2012 to January 6, 2013

Wari: Lords of the Ancient Andes

Between 600 and 1000, long before the Inca, the Wari forged a complex society widely regarded today as ancient Peru’s first empire.

October 27, 2012

World House Series: Voices of Change, Sounds of Freedom Symposium

Humanities Council of Washington, DC, hosts symposium on go-go, calypso, jazz, and classical music.

October 26, 2012

World House Series: Voices of Change, Sounds of Freedom Opening Reception

Humanities Council of Washington DC hosts an opening reception for "Voices of Change, Sounds of Freedom"

October 21, 2012 to January 13, 2013

Henry Ossawa Tanner: Modern Spirit

This major exhibition delves into the life and career of African American artist Henry Ossawa Tanner (1859–1937).

October 20, 2012

Making Meaning of May 4th: The Kent State Shootings in American History

Kent State University opens a long-term exhibition about the 1970 shooting of Kent State University students by National Guardsmen.

October 19, 2012 to October 20, 2012

An American Turning Point: Civil War 150 HistoryMobile

Housed in a tractor-trailer, this “museum on wheels" presents individual stories of the Civil War from the perspective of those who experienced it—young and old, enslaved and free, soldiers and civilians.

October 19, 2012

Tiny Nation, Big Problems: Cuba in American History

50 years ago this week, a U.S. military jet photographed strategic nuclear missiles that had been installed by the Soviets in Cuba.

October 17, 2012

National Youth Summit: Dust Bowl

A webcast discussion of Ken Burns' The Dust Bowl and environmental stewardship.

October 14, 2012 to January 21, 2013

Revealing the African Presence in Renaissance Europe

Revealing the African Presence in Renaissance Europe invites visitors to explore the roles of Africans and their descendents in Renaissance Europe as revealed in compelling paintings, drawings, sculpture and printed books of the period.

October 13, 2012 to October 13, 2012

West Virginia Book Festival

The West Virginia Book Festival brings people and books together in a two-day event that celebrates the Mountain State’s writers and brings authors from across the nation to Charleston, WV.

October 12, 2012 to October 14, 2012

Southern Festival of Books: A Celebration of the Written Word

A three-day book festival celebrated each year during the second full weekend of October in Downtown Nashville.

October 12, 2012 to December 7, 2012

Pride and Passion: The African-American Baseball Experience

Travelling exhibition examines the challenges faced by African-American baseball players.

October 11, 2012 to November 30, 2012

Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War

Traveling exhibition examines how President Lincoln used the Constitution to confront three intertwined crises of the Civil War—the secession of Southern states, slavery and wartime civil liberties.

October 10, 2012 to November 28, 2012

Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War

Traveling exhibition examines how Abraham Lincoln used the Constitution to confront the challenges of the Civil War.

October 7, 2012 to November 11, 2012

Broadway: The American Musical

This six-part documentary series chronicles the Broadway musical throughout the 20th century and explores the evolution of this uniquely American art form.

October 6, 2012 to January 14, 2013

Gods, Myths and Mortals: Discover Ancient Greece

Exhibition for children and famillies on Ancient Greece transports visitors to the bedrock of western civilization.

October 4, 2012 to October 6, 2012

Humanities Montana Festival of the Book

The 13th annual Humanities Montana Festival of the Book celebrates the literature of the West bringing over 70 authors to downtown Missoula.

October 3, 2012 to November 2, 2012

Manifold Greatness: The Creation and Afterlife of the King James Bible

Traveling exhibition celebrates the 400th anniversary of the King James Bible.

October 2, 2012

American Grace: How Religion Divides and Unites Us

Acclaimed author and political scientist Robert D. Putnam delivers the 17th annual Governor's Lecture in the Humanities in an address that focuses on the role of religion in American public life.

September 2012

September 28, 2012 to February 24, 2013

Palaces for the People: Guastavino and America’s Great Public Spaces

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and the Boston Public Library partner to present the first major exhibition on the Guastavino Company and its architectural and historical legacy.

September 28, 2012 to September 30, 2012

South Dakota Festival of Books

The South Dakota Festival of Books celebrates its 10th anniversary this year welcoming new festival authors Roy Blount Jr., Heid Erdrich, Karl Marlantes and Will Hermes.

September 26, 2012

2012 Griffith Honors Forum Lecture with Sherman Alexie

Author Sherman Alexie speaks at South Dakota State University to kick off the 2012 South Dakota Festival of Books.

September 22, 2012 to September 23, 2012

2012 National Book Festival

Join NEH at the 12th annual Library of Congress National Book Festival on the National Mall in Washington, DC

September 20, 2012

Natasha Trethewey reading at Jackson State University

Current Mississippi and United States Poet Laureate Natasha Trethewey will give a reading of her poetry at Jackson State University in an event cosponsored by the Mississippi Humanities Council.

September 18, 2012

Death and the Civil War

From acclaimed filmmaker Ric Burns, Death and the Civil War explores an essential but largely overlooked aspect of the most pivotal event in American history: the transformation of the nation by the death of an estimated 750,000 people – nearly two and a half percent of the population – in four dark and searing years from 1861 to 1865.

September 17, 2012

Emancipation Nation: Celebrating Freedom on Constitution Day

Join NEH in Washington, DC on Constitution Day for a celebration of Abraham Lincoln's Preliminary Emancipation Proclamation.

September 15, 2012

Sixth Annual Distinctive Women in Hawaiian History Program

Local historians, acclaimed scholars, poets, filmmakers, and students gather to celebrate “historic, famous, and not-so-famous” Hawaiian women.

September 14, 2012

Constitutionally Speaking with Justice David H. Souter

Retired U.S. Supreme Court Justice David Souter speaks at opening of Constitutionally Speaking project in New Hampshire.

September 13, 2012

One Evening in Maine: A Celebration of Robert McCloskey

Join the Maine Humanities Council for a benefit dinner to support programs for educators and at-risk populations on the 60th anniversary of McCloskey's book One Morning in Maine, the story of a lost tooth, a wish come true, and Maine at its most beautiful.

September 13, 2012 to October 31, 2012

15th Annual Utah Humanities Book Festival

From September 13th through the entire month of October, the Utah Humanities Book Festival will feature hundreds of authors and presenters.

September 11, 2012 to January 6, 2013

I Have Seen the Future: Norman Bel Geddes Designs America

I Have Seen the Future: Norman Bel Geddes Designs America explores the career of American stage and industrial designer, futurist and urban planner Norman Bel Geddes (1893-1958).

September 11, 2012 to January 6, 2013

Echoes of the Past: The Buddhist Cave Temples of Xiangtangshan

Echoes of the Past unites a group of imposing sculptures from the Northern Qi period (550-577 CE) Buddhist cave temple complex at Xiangtangshan in northern China with a full-scale, digital, 3-D reconstruction of the interior of one of the site's impressive caves.

September 1, 2012 to October 20, 2012

Our Lives, Our Stories: America's Greatest Generation

Our Lives, Our Stories explores the life arc of a single generation—the stories of their lives, told in their words—from birth to old age.

August 2012

August 31, 2012

Turf War: A History of College Sports

BackStory Radio's American History Guys explore the history of American college sports.

August 24, 2012

Conventional Wisdom: A History of American Political Conventions

BackStory Radio's American History Guys explore the development of American political conventions.

August 23, 2012 to August 24, 2012

Four Souls: Stories from America's Borders

This public humanities symposium brings together four of the nation's most celebrated writers and poets to share their stories.

August 22, 2012 to September 21, 2012

Manifold Greatness: The Creation and Afterlife of the King James Bible

Published in 1611, the King James Bible’s blend of poetry and piety has nurtured generation after generation.

August 19, 2012

Rediscovering Alexander Hamilton

Rediscovering Alexander Hamilton, hosted and written by author and journalist Richard Brookhiser, focuses on Hamilton’s character.

August 17, 2012

Climate Control: A History of Heating and Cooling

The American History Guys consider the advent of air conditioning, and explore its far-reaching implications on everything from architecture and leisure to demography and politics.

August 16, 2012 to September 24, 2012

Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War

Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War explores how Lincoln used the Constitution to confront three intertwined crises of the war—the secession of Southern states, slavery, and wartime civil liberties.

August 10, 2012

Here to There: A History of Mapping

From the 16th to 18th centuries, many European mapmakers were convinced that California was an island — an Edenic paradise populated by black Amazons.

August 9, 2012

NEH and Disaster Preparedness and Response

Congressional briefing on NEH and disaster preparedness and relief.

August 7, 2012 to October 28, 2012

Teenie Harris, Photographer: An American Story

Photographer Charles "Teenie" Harris chronicled a vibrant black urban community during the Jim Crow and Civil Rights eras.

August 5, 2012 to August 8, 2012

The War

This seven-part documentary series from Ken Burns and Lynn Novick explores the history and horror of the Second World War by following the fortunes of so-called ordinary American men and women who become caught up in one of the greatest cataclysms in human history.

August 3, 2012

Beach Bodies: A History of the American Physique

Aspirations to a more perfect body have a long history in America.

July 2012

July 31, 2012 to August 2, 2012

The War

This seven-part documentary series from Ken Burns and Lynn Novick explores the history and horror of the Second World War by following the fortunes of so-called ordinary American men and women who become caught up in one of the greatest cataclysms in human history.

July 29, 2012

Besa: The Promise

Besa: The Promise chronicles the inspiring story of Albanian Muslims who helped rescue Jewish refugees during World War II.

July 29, 2012 to November 25, 2012

The Legacy of the Plumed Serpent in Ancient Mexico

The Legacy of the Plumed Serpent in Ancient Mexico focuses on an era of cultural innovation in Mesoamerica. Trade networks, closely linked to the deity Quetzalcoatl, fostered the exchange of both goods and ideas across vast distances. These southern Mexican kingdoms, which recognized Quetzalcoatl as their founder and patron, became the Children of the Plumed Serpent.

July 27, 2012

City Upon a Hill: American Exceptionalism in U.S. History

In this episode, the American History Guys at BackStory Radio look at the changing meanings of Exceptionalism.

July 26, 2012

The Dust Bowl preview screening

A preview screening and panel discussion of Ken Burns' NEH-funded film The Dust Bowl at the White House.

July 20, 2012

Charles & Ray Eames: The Architect and the Painter

A White House screening and panel discussion of the NEH-funded documentary on Charles and Ray Eames.

July 12, 2012

Special Walking Tour: 19th Century Landmark Treasures of Noho

The tour will feature stories of famous as well as infamous residents and builders of these landmarks and the renowned architects who designed them. Stops will include Colonnade Row, the DeVinne Press Building, Astor Library, The Cooper Union, and the Bayard-Condict Building.

July 11, 2012 to August 10, 2012

Manifold Greatness: The Creation and Afterlife of the King James Bible

Published in 1611, the King James Bible’s blend of poetry and piety has nurtured generation after generation.

July 11, 2012 to August 20, 2012

For All The World To See: Visual Culture and the Struggle for Civil Rights

An NEH-supported exhibit at the National Civil Rights Museum examines the role of visual culture in the struggle for civil rights.

July 6, 2012 to October 7, 2012

Contested Visions in the Spanish Colonial World

Contested Visions in the Spanish Colonial World examines the significance of indigenous peoples within the artistic landscape of colonial Latin America.

July 6, 2012

Islamic Art: Mirror of the Invisible World

Travel to nine countries and across 1,400 years of cultural history to explore the astonishing artistic and architectural riches of Islam.

July 3, 2012

“The Meaning of the Fourth of July for the Negro”: A Communal Reading of a lecture by Frederick Douglass

One person comes with a poster; another, a mike and a stack of speeches.

July 2, 2012

“The Meaning of the Fourth of July for the Negro”: Frederick Douglass at the Massachusetts State House

One person comes with a poster; another, a mike and a stack of speeches.

June 2012

June 29, 2012

Independence Daze: A History of July Fourth

In the early days of our nation, July Fourth wasn’t an official holiday at all.

June 26, 2012

Pluralisms With a Big "S": The American Versions

Professor Martin E. Marty explores ways of understanding, interpreting, and teaching the varieties of phenomena we have in mind when we talk about America’s civil and religious “pluralism.”

June 20, 2012 to August 3, 2012

Pride and Passion: The African-American Baseball Experience

This nationally travelling exhibit examines the challenges faced by African-American baseball players as they sought equal opportunities in their sport beginning in the post-Civil War era, tthrough integration of the major leagues in the mid-20th century.

June 16, 2012

"Civility, With a German Immigrant Accent"

NEH Chairman Jim Leach delivers a public lecture entitled "Civility, With a German Immigrant Accent" at St. Ambrose University in Davenport, Iowa.

June 14, 2012 to June 16, 2012

Marianas History Conference

All About the Mariana Islands

June 12, 2012

Pedalpalooza

A conversation aboard bikes about where the news is going

May 2012

May 30, 2012

Exploring Communities of Muslim Women Throughout History

Women's worlds: the Qajar Era in Iran  and modern family law reform. 

May 26, 2012 to September 9, 2012

Henry Ossawa Tanner: Modern Spirit

More than one hundred works, from paintings to sculpture, are featured in this major exhibition devoted to the acclaimed artist Henry Ossawa Tanner (1859–1937).

May 25, 2012

Monumental Disagreements

Why is there no image of George Washington on the Washington Monument? Three history professors discuss the controversy over building the Washington Monument in "Monumental Disagreements,"...

May 23, 2012

Tenement Museum Talk

Making the Jewish Lower East Side Iconic: the Tenement Museum and the Story of American Immigration.

May 22, 2012

NEH on the Web: Online Resources for K-12 Education in the Humanities

Congressional staff members, both in DC and district offices, join NEH staff for a webinar to explore NEH-funded, web-based educational resources available for teachers, tutors, parents, and homeschooling families.

May 18, 2012

Home Bittersweet Home

The American history guys, all history professors, ask whether there was ever a Golden Age of home ownership in the second episode of a new NEH-funded weekly radio show being launched across the country.

May 17, 2012

"Cultural Power and the Role of the Humanities"

National Endowment for the Humanities Chairman Jim Leach delivers the keynote address on "Cultural Power and the Role of the Humanities" at the Barnett Symposium on Cultural Soft Power.

May 16, 2012

Wade in the Water: Songs and Stories of the Mississippi

As the Mississippi winds its way past New Orleans, American Routes is reminded of the power and place of these waterways in American culture.

May 13, 2012

Touching the Yupiaq Heart

Chairman Jim Leach delivers the commencement address at the University of Alaska.

May 11, 2012

BackStory with the American History Guys

University of Virginia history professors Peter Onuf and Brian Balogh and Ed Ayers, president of the University of Richmond, explore “Childbirth in America” in the first episode of a NEH-funded weekly show.

May 11, 2012

"The Power of the Humanities"

NEH Chairman Jim Leach delivers remarks on "The Power of the Humanities" to the American Council of Learned Societies.

May 4, 2012

NEH on the Web: Online Resources for K-12 Education in the Humanities

Congressional staff members, both in DC and district offices, join NEH staff for a webinar to explore NEH-funded, web-based educational resources.

May 1, 2012

Let’s Talk About It: Making Sense of the Civil War

Scholar-led reading and discussion series at 65 libraries across the country commemorates the sesquicentennial of the Civil War and Emancipation.  The NEH-funded series draws on March

April 2012

April 28, 2012

Building America: House and Home

A new permanent exhibition packs seven galleries with photographs, objects, models, “touch me” exhibits, and films on the history, technology, and changing culture of the American home.

April 26, 2012

Chairman Leach Introduces Besa: The Promise

NEH Chairman Jim Leach introduces NEH-funded documentary film, Besa: The Promise.

April 26, 2012

Every Day Is History Day

Chairman Leach speaks at celebration of History Day on Capitol Hill. 

April 26, 2012

Every Day Is History Day

Chairman Leach speaks at celebration of History Day on Capitol Hill. 

April 23, 2012

Wendell E. Berry delivers 41st Jefferson Lecture

“It All Turns on Affection”

April 18, 2012

Missouri Humanities Awards ceremony

Chairman Jim Leach delivers keynote address at the annual Missouri Humanities award ceremony for educators, scholars, community leaders and students who represent exemplary achievement in the human

April 17, 2012

An NEH conversation with 2011 Jefferson Lecturer Drew Gilpin Faust

Historian and Harvard University President Drew Gilpin Faust, returning to the NEH nearly a year after her lecture, Telling War Stories, Reflections of a Civil War Historian, discusses the lasting legacy of the Civil War.

April 11, 2012

A Heartland Congressional Workshop

NEH Congressional Affairs and the Smithsonian Institution cohost a breakfast workshop for Congressional staff on NEH On the Road.

April 5, 2012

Bridging Cultures through Law Film Series: The Loving Story

A screening of the NEH-funded documentary about Richard and Mildred Loving, whose successful challenge of a Virginia law barring interracial marriage changed history, provides the centerpiece for a  panel discussion of civil rights law.

April 1, 2012 to July 1, 2012

Children of the Plumed Serpent: The Legacy of Quetzalcoatl in Ancient Mexico

Chairman Jim Leach attends opening of new exhibition following the life and the epic stories of the Mexican culture-hero and deity, Quetzalcoatl, founder and benefactor of communities that flourish

March 2012

March 29, 2012

“The Relevance of the Humanities and the Challenge of Democracy”

Chairman Jim Leach delivers lecture on the Relevance of the Humanities and the Challenge of Democracy to the Los Angeles Institute for the Humanities

March 28, 2012

Chosen Food

A presentation on the Jewish Museum of Maryland's NEH-funded exhibit Chosen Food.

March 21, 2012

Bridging Cultures through Law Film Series: I Came to Testify

I Came to Testify, a documentary about women testifying to the use of rape as a war crime.

February 2012

February 22, 2012

Bridging Cultures through Law Film Series: Prohibition

A moderated panel discussion on issues of Constitutional law presented in Ken Burns' NEH-funded film Prohibition.

 

December 2011

December 13, 2011

Holiday Hill Workshop

The Congressional Affairs Office hosts a workshop to introduce new Congressional staff members to the inner workings of the NEH.

November 2011

November 16, 2011

Using the Humanities to Support Veterans

NEH brought together Veterans Affairs officials, representatives from Veterans Service Organizations, and military families to showcase two NEH-funded programs.

October 2011

October 19, 2011

Bridging Cultures through Law Film Series: Freedom Riders

Throughout the summer of 1961, more than 400 black and white young Americans traveled together on buses and trains throughout the Deep South...

September 2011

September 21, 2011

Preview Reception for Manifold Greatness: the Creation and Afterlife of the King James Bible

Members of Congress and staff attend a preview of the Manifold Greatness exhibition marking the 400th anniversary of the King James Bible.