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EXHIBITION

January 31, 2015

Civil War in Missouri: A State Divided

Missouri’s status as a border state forced many of its citizens to make difficult decisions and choose sides in a complex situation that resulted in a bitter, divisive, brutal, and psychological war within a war. Organized along three broad themes, the exhibition looks at the contest for the hearts, minds, and bodies of Missouri’s citizens.

January 12, 2015 to February 7, 2015

The Way Things Were: Texas Settlers and Their Buildings, 1860s–1930s

This Humanities Texas traveling exhibition looks at early Texas buildings for information about settlers' visions of community and progress and their accommodation to the physical demands and economic realities of everyday life.

January 8, 2015

Rationing Food During the Depression

The 1930s were a trying time for most Kansans. Learn how people lived through the Depression by hearing what they ate.

January 7, 2015 to March 1, 2015

Black Art—Ancestral Legacy: The African Impulse in African American Art

This exhibition addresses the question posed by African American poet Countee Cullen in 1926: “What is Africa to me?”  This exhibition provides a number of examples from twentieth-century African American artists—both trained and untrained—that visually respond to this question.

January 6, 2015 to January 19, 2015

The Road to the Promised Land: Martin Luther King Jr. and the Civil Rights Movement

Exhibition featuring photographs, facsimiles of landmark documents, and quotations by Dr. King and others engaged in the struggle for civil rights, this Humanities Texas traveling exhibition surveys the Civil Rights Movement from the emergence of Martin Luther King Jr. in the Montgomery bus boycott of 1955 through the 1990s.

January 2, 2015

Hometown Teams in Rice County

The project is part of "Hometown Teams," a statewide initiative exploring the way sports build and unite communities.

January 1, 2015 to January 4, 2015

RACE: Are We So Different

RACE brings together the everyday experience of living with race, its history, the role of science in that history, and the findings of contemporary science that are challenging its foundations.

December 29, 2014 to February 7, 2015

Miguel Covarrubias: Caricaturista

Miguel Covarrubias (1904–1957) was one of the foremost Mexican artists of the twentieth century.

December 15, 2014

Terza Domenica Heritage Series - Nativity Scene and other Italian Christmas Traditions

Nativity scenes are very popular in Italy and are generally found in every household. This tradition dates back to the 13th century and to St. Francis of Assisi. The nativity scenes are associated with Naples, which turned them into an art form. The artisans who have carried on their craft from father to son have organized into a guild that protects their traditions.

December 1, 2014

The Way We Worked in Palm Harbor

The Way We Worked, adapted from an original exhibition developed by the National Archives, explores how work became such a central element in American culture by tracing the many changes that affected the workforce and work environments over the past 150 years.  The exhibition draws from the Archives’ rich collections to tell this compelling story.

December 1, 2014 to December 31, 2014

Southwest Michigan in the Civil War

Exhibit visitors will learn about the life of a local soldier from recruitment to training camp, and arrival on the battlefield.

November 13, 2014

Scandinavian Modern Design: Norwegian Enamel

This exhibition focuses on Norwegian enamel production (technology, innovation, and business) and enamel design. Artistic and technical innovations in enamel work were Norway’s greatest, though least remembered, contributions to the Scandinavian Modern Design movement of the mid-twentieth century.

November 12, 2014 to June 14, 2015

Mendes Cohen Living History Character

Come meet the most interesting person you have never heard of!

November 10, 2014 to January 5, 2015

Vaquero: Genesis of the Texas Cowboy

In the early 1970s, Bill Wittliff visited a ranch in northern Mexico where the vaqueros still worked cattle in traditional ways. Wittliff photographed the vaqueros as they went about daily chores that had changed little since the first Mexican cowherders learned to work cattle from a horse's back. Wittliff captured a way of life that now exists only in memory and in the photographs included in this exhibition.

November 1, 2014

Buen Provecho: The History of Food in Latin America

An exhibit focusing on food in Latin American culture to be held in connection with the Newark Public Library’s celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month.

October 25, 2014 to May 17, 2015

La Belle: The Ship That Changed History

On October 25, 2014, the shipwreck La Belle will be reconstructed live at the Bullock Museum in the special exhibition,

October 24, 2014

Earthquakes, Chukars and Millionaires: The Mackay Mines Story

The exhibit celebrates Nevada's sesquicentennial, and it will be interactive and encourage visitor participation; for example, visitors will see and have an opportunity to attempt a 1920s geology exam.

October 19, 2014

Patchwork of the Prairie

Yvonne Hollenback presents a trunk show of approximately 30 quilts made by members of the same family spanning 135 years. The stories behind both the quilters and the quilts themselves are shared and accompanied with some of Hollenbeck’s own cowboy/cowgirl poetry.

October 15, 2014 to November 14, 2014

Crossroads of Empire: Early Printed Maps of the American Southwest

The traveling exhibition spans the mapmaking enterprise, beginning with the earliest known map to show the Texas edge of the Gulf (1512) and ending with an 1873 map of Texas showing the right of way granted to railroads.

October 6, 2014 to November 14, 2014

Changing the Face of Power: Women in the U.S. Senate

The exhibition based on Melina Mara's work, was created by the Dolph Briscoe Center for American History at The University of Texas at Austin.

October 1, 2014 to November 21, 2014

Annexation: Celebrating Texas Statehood

This Humanities Texas traveling exhibition narrates the story of Texas as a Mexican colony and Republic, its campaign to join the United States, the vote for annexation, and the consequences of that vote.

September 27, 2014 to February 1, 2015

Flint Hills Forces: The Shaping of Manhattan, Fort Riley and Kansas State University 1917-1963

Exhibition and series of public programs exploring the history of the region between 1917 and 1963.

September 26, 2014 to May 25, 2015

Chinese American: Exclusion/Inclusion

Chinese American: Exclusion/Inclusion chronicles the complex history of the Chinese in America, from the early days of the China trade to the history of Chinese immigration and the life of Chinese Americans.

September 17, 2014 to January 24, 2015

The World Knew: Jan Karski's Mission for Humanity

This exhibition illustrates Jan Karski’s mission of courage during World War II, and his subsequent life and testimony.

September 12, 2014 to September 14, 2014

Living History The Final Invasion Plattsburgh, New York

The Bicentennial of the Battle of Plattsburgh is a once in a lifetime opportunity to have history come alive in an extraordinary way for teachers and the public.

September 7, 2014 to December 12, 2014

Bandits & Heroes, Poets & Saints: Popular Art of the Northeast of Brazil

The story of how African, European, and indigenous cultural traditions have interacted over a period of more than 500 years to form the distinctive culture of this fascinating area of the largest country in South America.

September 1, 2014 to September 30, 2014

The Blessings of Liberty: The U.S. Constitution

This exhibition seeks to explain the immense importance of a document that holds answers to challenging questions of government and features twelve panels charting the progress of former colonies to a united nation.

August 28, 2014

Ukrainian Immigration to the Coal Region of Northeastern Pennsylvania

 Audiences learn the reasons for this first major wave of Ukrainian immigration and explore the cultural legacy of the early immigrants.

August 9, 2014

The History of Trick Roping and the Wild West Show

South of the border in Old Mexico, the charros created rope spinning -making intricate flower designs with ropes. When Vincente Otopeza introduced this trick roping tradition to Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show in 1894, he gave American cowboys a different perspective on trick and fancy roping.

August 4, 2014 to August 29, 2014

Voces Americanas: Latino Literature in the United States

A celebratory survey of works by Latinos in the past thirty years.

August 1, 2014 to August 29, 2014

Citizens at Last: The Woman Suffrage Movement in Texas

Created to celebrate the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment.

August 1, 2014 to September 1, 2014

Dugout Canoes: Paddling Through the Americas

Discover how dugout canoes have affected life and travel throughout the Americas and explore the world's largest archaeological find - 101 ancient dugouts at Newnans Lake.

July 8, 2014 to December 31, 2014

Stable Views: Life in the Backstretch of the Thoroughbred Racetrack

This exhibition that uses art, photography, and oral histories to explore the daily life of those who work in the stable areas of New York's thoroughbred racetracks.

June 20, 2014 to September 21, 2014

Behind Closed Doors: Art in the Spanish American Home, 1492–1898

The first major exhibition in the United States to explore the private lives and interiors of Spain’s New World elite from 1492 through the nineteenth century.

June 19, 2014

One Trail, Many Voices: Songs of the Oregon Trail

Folksinger and storyteller Hank Cramer will share traditional folksongs and culture of the Pacific Northwest's Orgeon Trail.

June 14, 2014 to September 7, 2014

Archibald Motley: Jazz Age Modernist

Retrospective of Jazz Age artist Archibald Motley's scenes of life in the African-American community

June 14, 2014

Civil War in Missouri: A State Divided

Missouri’s status as a border state forced many of its citizens to make difficult decisions and choose sides in a complex situation that resulted in a bitter, divisive, brutal, and psychological war within a war.

June 9, 2014 to February 1, 2015

Earthquakes, Chukars and Millionaires: The Mackay Mines Story

The exhibit celebrates Nevada's sesquicentennial, and it will be interactive and encourage visitor participation; for example, visitors will see and have an opportunity to attempt a 1920s geology exam.

May 24, 2014 to July 20, 2014

Museum on Main Street: Journey Stories – Casper

Journey Stories explore how travel has shaped the U.S. both culturally and economically.

May 10, 2014

Created Equal: Walking Tour of Boston Black Heritage Trail

Focuses on the emerging free black community of the 1800s and their leading efforts in the Abolition Movement, the Underground Railroad, and the early struggles for equality and justice.

May 9, 2014

Shadows and Sounds: Memories from a Forgotten Neighborhood

Visitors are invited to delve into the history of the former West Elmwood neighborhood and current Huntington Industrial Park through an immersive sound installation. Organized activities will take place every half-hour, including a hands-on science demonstration, storytelling and a scavenger hunt.

May 5, 2014 to May 30, 2014

Vaquero: Genesis of the Texas Cowboy

In the early 1970s, Bill Wittliff visited a ranch in northern Mexico where the vaqueros still worked cattle in traditional ways. Wittliff photographed the vaqueros as they went about daily chores that had changed little since the first Mexican cowherders learned to work cattle from a horse's back.

May 4, 2014

Rethinking the Puerto Rican Riots of 1974

Exhibit explores the series of disturbances and confrontations that took place between Newark’s Puerto Rican community and city police in 1974.

May 1, 2014 to May 29, 2014

Annexation: Celebrating Texas Statehood

This Humanities Texas traveling exhibition narrates the story of Texas as a Mexican colony and Republic, its campaign to join the United States, the vote for annexation, and the consequences of that vote.

April 26, 2014 to August 17, 2014

American Spirits: The Rise and Fall of Prohibition

Step back in time to an era of flappers and suffragists, bootleggers and temperance lobbyists, and real-life legends like Al Capone and Carry Nation.

April 9, 2014

"To Be! Shakespeare Here and Now"

Shakespeare's work isn't recited, but performed by professional actor, stunt-person, improv artist and educator.

April 4, 2014

American Chronicles: The Art of Norman Rockwell

Exhibition tracing the evolution of Rockwell’s art and iconography throughout his career.

April 1, 2014 to April 30, 2014

The Dust Bowl

The Dust Bowl.  In the 1930s, photographers working for the Farm Security Administration (FSA) captured unforgettable images of human fortitude and despair in the face of calamity.

April 1, 2014 to May 1, 2014

Anne Frank - A History for Today

The story of Anne Frank against the background of the Holocaust and the Second World War.

March 24, 2014 to April 18, 2014

Crossroads of Empire: Early Printed Maps of the American Southwest

The traveling exhibition spans the mapmaking enterprise, beginning with the earliest known map to show the Texas edge of the Gulf (1512) and ending with an 1873 map of Texas showing the right of way granted to railroads.

March 22, 2014 to May 4, 2014

Hometown Teams: How Sports Shape America (Traveling Smithsonian Exhibition)

Each weekend, hundreds of thousands of Americans participate in some sport, on some level. We win and we lose, and we yearn to play another day. And if we’re not playing, we’re watching: in the stands, on the fields with our sons and daughters, or in our living rooms with friends in front of a television.

March 7, 2014 to April 23, 2014

Faces and Places of the Chihuahuan Desert

Covering over 140,000 square miles, the Chihuahuan Desert is considered the largest in North America.

March 5, 2014 to May 26, 2014

American Chronicles: The Art of Norman Rockwell

Exhibition tracing the evolution of Rockwell’s art.

March 2, 2014 to May 26, 2014

Treasures from Korea: Arts and Culture of the Joseon Dynasty, 1392-1910

An exhibit of more than a hundred fifty works drawn primarily from the National Museum of Korea dazzles with paintings, scultpture, and decorative arts

February 26, 2014

Road to the Promised Land

The Civil Rights Movement from 1954 to the 1980s changed the face of the nation, laying the groundwork for crusades by other minorities to claim their rights. The efforts to achieve equality produced a revolutionary social impact.

February 14, 2014

Road to the Promised Land: The Civil Rights Movement

Traveling exhibition surveys the Civil Rights Movement from the emergence of Martin Luther King Jr. in the Montgomery bus boycott of 1955 through the 1990s.

February 11, 2014

Western Africa Before the Boats

The exhibit explores what life was like in Africa before the slave trade began, approximately 1500-1650 AD.

February 8, 2014 to May 4, 2014

The 1968 Exhibit

Revisit the extraordinary events of 1968

February 7, 2014 to March 6, 2014

The Dust Bowl

In the 1930s, photographers working for the Farm Security Administration (FSA) captured unforgettable images of human fortitude and despair in the face of calamity.

February 6, 2014

Stories From the Underground Railroad

This presentation is part art exhibition, part history, and part decoding of the secrets behind the quilt patches that are synonymous with the Underground Railroad.

February 5, 2014

Forging Faith, Building Freedom: African American Faith Experiences in Delaware, 1800-1980

Two hundred years ago, in 1813, Peter Spencer founded the African Union Church, the first independent black denomination in the United States. The next year, he started the August Quarterly, the nation’s oldest African American festival.

February 3, 2014 to March 30, 2014

Citizens at Last: The Woman Suffrage Movement in Texas

Created to celebrate the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment.

February 1, 2014 to February 28, 2014

Road to the Promised Land: Martin Luther King Jr. and the Civil Rights Movement

Exhibition featuring photographs, facsimiles of landmark documents, and quotations by Dr. King and others engaged in the struggle for civil rights.

January 30, 2014

“Ask an Expert” Exhibitions

Brian Horrigan, Exhibit Curator, Minnesota Historical Society will lead the NEH Google+ Hangout on Exhibitions, sharing a behind-the-scenes look at his work putting together the NEH-supported exhibition The 1968 Exhibit.

January 15, 2014 to December 31, 2017

In Pursuit of Freedom

Exhibition on the unsung heroes of Brooklyn’s anti-slavery movement

January 13, 2014 to March 7, 2014

Fact, Fiction, and the New World: The Role of Books in the Making of America

The availability of books and the spread of literacy profoundly influenced the discovery of the New World

January 9, 2014 to February 6, 2014

“Across the Divide”

Exhibition of works by Chinese artists and accompanying symposium on the role art plays in representing cultural identities

January 1, 2014 to December 31, 2014

Depots of Iowa: The James H. Andrew Railroad Museum & History Center

December 6, 2013 to January 4, 2014

Museum on Main Street - New Harmonies: Celebrating American Roots Music

Museum on Main Street is a cultural project that serves rural America.

November 25, 2013 to December 22, 2013

A State Divided: The Civil War in Missouri

A State Divided: The Civil War in Missouri is a joint project of the Missouri History Museum and the Missouri Humanities Council.

November 8, 2013 to January 5, 2014

Preserving the Iraqi Jewish Archive

Recovered records of the once vibrant Jewish life in Iraq

October 2, 2013 to November 15, 2013

Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War

Traveling exhibition examines how President Lincoln used the Constitution to confront three intertwined crises of the Civil War—the secession of Southern states, slavery and wartime civil liberties.

September 6, 2013 to October 2, 2013

Crossing Cultures: the Art of Manga in Hawai'i

Exhibition supported by the Hawai’i Council for the Humanities brings together seven Hawai‘i-produced manga and explores the varied cross-cultural sources that influenced the narratives and artistic styles of these works.

June 16, 2013 to September 8, 2013

Wari: Lords of the Ancient Andes

Between 600 and 1000, the Wari forged a complex society widely regarded today as ancient Peru’s first empire.

June 14, 2013 to September 2, 2013

The 1968 Exhibit

Revisit 1968 at the National Constitution Center

June 12, 2013 to August 16, 2013

Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War

This traveling exhibition examines how President Lincoln used the Constitution to confront three intertwined crises of the Civil War—the secession of Southern states, slavery and wartime civil liberties.

May 29, 2013 to July 12, 2013

Manifold Greatness: The Creation and Afterlife of the King James Bible

Traveling exhibit on the dramatic history of the King James Bible, what we know about the scholars who translated it, and how it has continued to influence literature, culture, and society for over 400 years.

May 24, 2013 to July 6, 2013

The Way We Worked

May 19, 2013 to October 27, 2013

Free & Safe: The Underground Railroad in Vermont

A new exhibit at Rokeby Museum, a National Historic Landmark and Underground Railroad site, traces the journey of two fugitive slaves from slavery to freedom.

April 29, 2013 to May 1, 2014

The Moton School Story: Children of Courage

New Civil Rights exhibition explores origin and aftermath of ‘Brown v. Board’
April 27, 2013 to September 2, 2013

Designing Tomorrow: America's World's Fairs of the 1930s

Designing Tomorrow: America's World's Fairs of the 1930s showcases six Depression-era expositions that brought visions of a brighter future to tens of millions of Americans.

March 16, 2013 to January 20, 2014

Palaces for the People: Guastavino and America’s Great Public Spaces

The architectural legacy of Rafael Guastavino Sr. (1842-1908), arguably the most influential architectural craftsman working in late-nineteenth and early-twentieth-century America.

February 20, 2013 to April 5, 2013

Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War

Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War, a traveling exhibition, examines how President Abraham Lincoln used the Constitution to confront three intertwined crises of the Civil War – the secession of Southern states, slavery, and wartime civil liberties.

February 16, 2013 to June 9, 2013

Revealing the African Presence in Renaissance Europe

An exhibition exploring the presence of Africans and their descendants in Europe from the late 1400s to the early 1600s and the roles these individuals played in society as reflected in art.

February 10, 2013 to May 19, 2013

Wari: Pre-Inca Lords of Peru

Wari’s capital is one of the largest archaeological sites in South America. From AD 600 and 1000, its denizens created an exhilarating episode in the history of the Americas by forging a society now widely regarded as one of the western hemisphere’s first empires.

 

February 2, 2013 to April 28, 2013

1968: The Year that Rocked America

The social forces that swirled through the turbulent 1960s crested in 1968. It was a turning point for a generation coming of age and a nation at war.
February 2, 2013 to February 22, 2013

Manifold Greatness: The Creation and Afterlife of the King James Bible

Manifold Greatness: The Creation and Afterlife of the King James Bible celebrates the 400th anniversary of the first printing of the King James Bible in 1611 and examines its fascinating and complex history.

February 2, 2013 to April 14, 2013

Carnaval!

The sights and sounds of Carnaval in New Orleans, Mexico, Bolivia, Brazil, Trinidad, Italy, Spain, and Switzerland.

January 18, 2013 to February 28, 2013

Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War

Traveling exhibition explores how Lincoln used the Constitution to confront three intertwined crises of the war—the secession of Southern states, slavery, and wartime civil liberties.

December 26, 2012 to January 24, 2013

Freedom Riders

Freedom Riders looks at six months in 1961 when more than 400 courageous Americans - old and young, black and white, men and women, Northern and Southern - risked their lives to challenge segregated facilities in the South.

December 12, 2012 to February 8, 2013

Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War

Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War explores how Lincoln used the Constitution to confront three intertwined crises of the war—the secession of Southern states, slavery, and wartime civil liberties.

December 10, 2012 to February 2, 2013

From Morning to Night: Domestic Service in the Gilded Age South

The traveling exhibit examines the role of African Americans in domestic service in the South.

November 15, 2012 to March 10, 2013

For All The World To See: Visual Culture and the Struggle for Civil Rights

For All The World To See is the first comprehensive museum exhibition to explore the historic role played by visual image

November 10, 2012 to December 19, 2012

Pride and Passion: The African-American Baseball Experience

A traveling exhibition examining the challenges faced by African-American baseball players as they sought equal opportunities in their sport begining in the post-Civil War era.

October 28, 2012 to January 6, 2013

Wari: Lords of the Ancient Andes

Between 600 and 1000, long before the Inca, the Wari forged a complex society widely regarded today as ancient Peru’s first empire.

October 21, 2012 to January 13, 2013

Henry Ossawa Tanner: Modern Spirit

This major exhibition delves into the life and career of African American artist Henry Ossawa Tanner (1859–1937).

October 20, 2012

Making Meaning of May 4th: The Kent State Shootings in American History

Kent State University opens a long-term exhibition about the 1970 shooting of Kent State University students by National Guardsmen.

October 19, 2012 to October 20, 2012

An American Turning Point: Civil War 150 HistoryMobile

Housed in a tractor-trailer, this “museum on wheels" presents individual stories of the Civil War from the perspective of those who experienced it—young and old, enslaved and free, soldiers and civilians.

October 14, 2012 to January 21, 2013

Revealing the African Presence in Renaissance Europe

Revealing the African Presence in Renaissance Europe invites visitors to explore the roles of Africans and their descendents in Renaissance Europe as revealed in compelling paintings, drawings, sculpture and printed books of the period.

October 12, 2012 to December 7, 2012

Pride and Passion: The African-American Baseball Experience

Travelling exhibition examines the challenges faced by African-American baseball players.

October 11, 2012 to November 30, 2012

Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War

Traveling exhibition examines how President Lincoln used the Constitution to confront three intertwined crises of the Civil War—the secession of Southern states, slavery and wartime civil liberties.

October 10, 2012 to November 28, 2012

Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War

Traveling exhibition examines how Abraham Lincoln used the Constitution to confront the challenges of the Civil War.

October 6, 2012 to January 14, 2013

Gods, Myths and Mortals: Discover Ancient Greece

Exhibition for children and famillies on Ancient Greece transports visitors to the bedrock of western civilization.

October 3, 2012 to November 2, 2012

Manifold Greatness: The Creation and Afterlife of the King James Bible

Traveling exhibition celebrates the 400th anniversary of the King James Bible.

September 28, 2012 to February 24, 2013

Palaces for the People: Guastavino and America’s Great Public Spaces

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and the Boston Public Library partner to present the first major exhibition on the Guastavino Company and its architectural and historical legacy.

September 11, 2012 to January 6, 2013

I Have Seen the Future: Norman Bel Geddes Designs America

I Have Seen the Future: Norman Bel Geddes Designs America explores the career of American stage and industrial designer, futurist and urban planner Norman Bel Geddes (1893-1958).

September 11, 2012 to January 6, 2013

Echoes of the Past: The Buddhist Cave Temples of Xiangtangshan

Echoes of the Past unites a group of imposing sculptures from the Northern Qi period (550-577 CE) Buddhist cave temple complex at Xiangtangshan in northern China with a full-scale, digital, 3-D reconstruction of the interior of one of the site's impressive caves.

September 1, 2012 to October 20, 2012

Our Lives, Our Stories: America's Greatest Generation

Our Lives, Our Stories explores the life arc of a single generation—the stories of their lives, told in their words—from birth to old age.

August 22, 2012 to September 21, 2012

Manifold Greatness: The Creation and Afterlife of the King James Bible

Published in 1611, the King James Bible’s blend of poetry and piety has nurtured generation after generation.

August 16, 2012 to September 24, 2012

Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War

Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War explores how Lincoln used the Constitution to confront three intertwined crises of the war—the secession of Southern states, slavery, and wartime civil liberties.

August 7, 2012 to October 28, 2012

Teenie Harris, Photographer: An American Story

Photographer Charles "Teenie" Harris chronicled a vibrant black urban community during the Jim Crow and Civil Rights eras.

July 29, 2012 to November 25, 2012

The Legacy of the Plumed Serpent in Ancient Mexico

The Legacy of the Plumed Serpent in Ancient Mexico focuses on an era of cultural innovation in Mesoamerica. Trade networks, closely linked to the deity Quetzalcoatl, fostered the exchange of both goods and ideas across vast distances. These southern Mexican kingdoms, which recognized Quetzalcoatl as their founder and patron, became the Children of the Plumed Serpent.

July 11, 2012 to August 10, 2012

Manifold Greatness: The Creation and Afterlife of the King James Bible

Published in 1611, the King James Bible’s blend of poetry and piety has nurtured generation after generation.

July 11, 2012 to August 20, 2012

For All The World To See: Visual Culture and the Struggle for Civil Rights

An NEH-supported exhibit at the National Civil Rights Museum examines the role of visual culture in the struggle for civil rights.

July 6, 2012 to October 7, 2012

Contested Visions in the Spanish Colonial World

Contested Visions in the Spanish Colonial World examines the significance of indigenous peoples within the artistic landscape of colonial Latin America.

June 20, 2012 to August 3, 2012

Pride and Passion: The African-American Baseball Experience

This nationally travelling exhibit examines the challenges faced by African-American baseball players as they sought equal opportunities in their sport beginning in the post-Civil War era, tthrough integration of the major leagues in the mid-20th century.

May 26, 2012 to September 9, 2012

Henry Ossawa Tanner: Modern Spirit

More than one hundred works, from paintings to sculpture, are featured in this major exhibition devoted to the acclaimed artist Henry Ossawa Tanner (1859–1937).

April 28, 2012

Building America: House and Home

A new permanent exhibition packs seven galleries with photographs, objects, models, “touch me” exhibits, and films on the history, technology, and changing culture of the American home.

April 1, 2012 to July 1, 2012

Children of the Plumed Serpent: The Legacy of Quetzalcoatl in Ancient Mexico

Chairman Jim Leach attends opening of new exhibition following the life and the epic stories of the Mexican culture-hero and deity, Quetzalcoatl, founder and benefactor of communities that flourish

March 28, 2012

Chosen Food

A presentation on the Jewish Museum of Maryland's NEH-funded exhibit Chosen Food.

September 21, 2011

Preview Reception for Manifold Greatness: the Creation and Afterlife of the King James Bible

Members of Congress and staff attend a preview of the Manifold Greatness exhibition marking the 400th anniversary of the King James Bible.