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NEH Digital Humanities Project Directors Meeting – Open to Public

August 30, 2011 | By Jason Rhody

Come learn about developing mobile app platforms for history, capturing dance notation using an iPad, using gaming technology to teach the history of medicine, or applying crowdsourcing to culinary history … all in just two minutes.

From 10:30 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. on September 27th at the National Endowment for the Humanities, the recipients of the 2011 NEH Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants will give the public a sneak preview of 54 ground-breaking projects that apply cutting-edge technology to high quality research in the humanities. Recipients of Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities Grants will also present.

On September 27th, Start-Up and Institute grant recipients from around the country will assemble at NEH headquarters in Washington D.C. in room M-09 to present their projects in “lightning-round” format. Project directors will have just two minutes and three PowerPoint slides to introduce and explain their projects to the public. See the full schedule of presentations here.

In between morning and afternoon lightning-round project presentations, Cathy N. Davidson, Ruth F. DeVarney Professor of English & John Hope Franklin Humanities Institute Professor of Interdisciplinary Studies at Duke University, will deliver a lunchtime talk entitled “NOW YOU SEE IT: How the Brain Science of Attention Will Transform the Way We Live, Work, and Learn.”

The National Endowment for the Humanities invites you to join us—whether for a few minutes, or a few hours—to survey the future of digital humanities, in lightning-quick bursts. We ask that those who plan to attend please register, as seating is limited.

Registration: [Edit: Registration Now Closed]

Those too far away to make the event can use the Twitter hashtag: #SUG2011 to follow along online.

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Digital Humanities Project Directors Meeting

NEH, Room M-09

10:30 – 10:45 – Welcome
10:45 – 12:00 – Lightning Round #1
12:00 – 12:30 – Lunch (on your own; a food court is available in the OPO)
12:30 – 1:15 – Lunchtime Remarks

Lunchtime Speaker: Cathy Davidson, NOW YOU SEE IT: How the Brain Science of Attention Will Transform the Way We Live, Work, and Learn

Using cutting-edge research on the brain and learning, Cathy N. Davidson shows how the phenomenon of “attention blindness” shapes our lives, and how it has led to one of the greatest problems of our historical moment: Although we email, blog, tweet, and text as if by instinct, too many of us toil in schools and workplaces designed for the last century, not the one in which we live. A “technopragmatist,” Davidson helps us to think in historical, theoretical, institutional, and practical ways about thriving in the connected, global world we already inhabit.

Cathy N. Davidson served as Vice Provost for Interdisciplinary Studies at Duke University from 1998 until 2006, where she helped create the Program in Information Science + Information Studies, the John Hope Franklin Humanities Institute, and many other programs. She is currently the Ruth F. DeVarney Professor of English and the John Hope Franklin Humanities Institute Professor of Interdisciplinary Studies at Duke University. In 2002, she co-founded HASTAC (Humanities, Arts, Science, and Technology Advanced Collaboratory, or "haystack"). In 2010, President Obama nominated her to a six-year term on the National Council on the Humanities.

1:15 – 2:30 – Lightning Round #2
2:30 – 2:45 – Break
2:45 – 3:30 – Getting the Word Out: Outreach Strategies for your Project
3:30 – Public Meeting Adjourns

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Begun in 2007, NEH Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants support pioneering projects that use technology to advance the humanities. These small grants are designed to spur innovation, test new ideas, and act as a catalyst for further development in the field. Some projects focus on specific topics in the humanities. Others explore new technology-based methods for research, scholarly publications, collaboration, or public programming.

Since 2008, the Institutes for Advanced Technology in the Digital Humanities grant program has supported national or regional training programs for scholars and advanced graduate students to broaden and extend their knowledge of digital humanities. Through these programs, NEH seeks to increase the number of humanities scholars using digital technology in their research and to broadly disseminate knowledge about advanced technology tools and methodologies relevant to the humanities.

Directions to the National Endowment for the Humanities:

http://www.neh.gov/about/visiting-neh

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