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September 2009

the latest from
Suite 603

 


September 24, 2009

California and Hawai'i featured in Humanities magazine's September/October "Around the Nation"

With support from the Hawai'i Council for the Humanities, the Honolulu Academy of Arts is exhibiting Katsushika Hokusai's Thirty-Six Views of Mount Fuji, including The Great Wave Off Kanagawa. Gift of James A. Michener, 1955; photo by Tim Siegert/Honolulu Academy of Arts
Hail: Judith Havemann and Eva Caldera
& Farewell: Dwan Reece
Rick Yarosh's portrait at the National Portrait Gallery

Bookmark it! There is a lot of information on the Federal/State Partnership website

Projects by the North Carolina Humanities Council receive awards for outstanding work in the humanities

2010 We the People Bookshelf is open for applications: "A More Perfect Union"
National Book Festival this Saturday in Washington

Hail: Judith Havemann and Eva Caldera

Chairman Jim Leach has announced the appointments of Judith Havemann to be Director of Communications and Public Affairs and Eva Caldera to serve as Senior Advisor to the Chairman.

Judy comes to NEH from the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars where she was senior editor of The Wilson Quarterly. Before joining the Wilson Center staff, Judy held a number of positions at the Washington Post, including among others that of national reporter, deputy national editor, Virginia editor, Maryland editor, director of recruiting and editing, and executive editor of the Post’s weekly Food section. While working as journalist at the Post, Judy was the recipient of a Nieman fellowship at Harvard University.

Eva and her family recently located to the Washington, D.C. area from Albuquerque, New Mexico where from 2004 to 2009 she taught and conducted research in healthcare ethics, law, and policy, and the ethics of emerging technologies (including nanotechnology and neurotechnology) at the University of New Mexico. Eva, who received her law degree from Harvard University in l986, will help to establish partnerships with other federal agencies, provide policy advice to the Chairman’s office, and serve as liaison to the National Council on the Humanities.

& Farewell: Dwan Reece

After more than nine years in Federal/State Partnership, Dwan Reece has left NEH to take up a position as Museum Curator at the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of African American History and Culture. At this new museum—slated to open in 2015, Dwan will be responsible for developing a collection and conducting research in African American Music and Performance. In addition. she will lead the conceptual planning for the Museum's opening exhibition, "Musical Crossroads."

During her years as Senior Program Officer at NEH, Dwan has led Federal/State Partnership's involvement with We the People and state humanities councils. She has managed the submission of annual compliance reports and developed an increasingly detailed reporting capability for the agency. Many of you have worked with Dwan on her central involvement in site visits and the self-assessment process, and many, many other responsibilities.

We wish her all the best as she moves across the Mall to the Smithsonian.

Rick Yarosh's portrait at the National Portrait Gallery

The National Portrait Gallery in Washington, DC will display the portrait of Rick Yarosh from the 100 Faces of War Experience project supported by Mass Humanities. The portrait will be on display from October 23, 2009 through August 22, 2010. Rick Yarosh's statement will accompany his portrait along with an explanation of the 100 Faces of War Experience project.

Bookmark it! There is a lot of information on the Federal/State Partnership website

login: fedstate — password: partnership

The Federal/State Partnership website is a resource for executives, boards, and staff of state humanities councils. All the documents and information you could want from Federal/State Partnership are available for perusal and download at your convenience.

Join the Federal/State Partnership email list from the first page of the website.

Projects by the North Carolina Humanities Council receive awards for outstanding work in the humanities

Spinner in Vivian Cotton Mills, Cherryville, NC, 1908. Lewis Wickes Hine. U.S. National Child Labor Committee Records, Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division
Spinner in Vivian Cotton Mills, Cherryville, NC, 1908. Lewis Wickes Hine. U.S. National Child Labor Committee Records, Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division

The North Carolina Humanities Council is proud to announce that three sponsored projects have received significant awards. The projects demonstrate the relevance and importance of the humanities in the daily lives of North Carolinians.

  • Project Director Karen Loughmiller and Archivist Betsy Murray, both of the Asheville Public Library, received Buncombe County’s 2009 Excellence in Public Service Award in the "Improving Diversity" category for the oral history/documentary photography project "Twilight of a Neighborhood: Asheville’s East End – c.1970."
  • The Gaston County Museum of Art & History won the Award of Merit from the American Association of State and Local History for the exhibit component of "Standing on a Box: Lewis Hine’s National Child Labor Committee Photography in Gaston County, 1908." The project director is Carol Reinhardt of the Gaston County Public Library.
  • "LifeVerse," a Greensboro Public Library project directed by Steve Sumerford that began two years ago as the Council-funded "The Elders Poetry Project," won first place in the annual American Library Diversity and Outreach Fair at the annual American Library Association conference. "LifeVerse" delivers poetry programming into nursing homes, assisted living centers, worship places, and adult day care sites. "LifeVerse" has taken poetry programs to over 3,000 older adults in twenty-five facilities across Guilford County in North Carolina.

2010 We the People Bookshelf is open for applications: "A More Perfect Union"

Looking toward the 150th anniversary of the Civil War, the 2010 We the People Bookshelf features books that explore the meaning of the American "union" and the motto of the United States, e pluribus unum, out of many, one.

An added bonus is a full DVD set of Ken Burns' The Civil War, complete with performance rights, that goes to each Bookshelf recipient. Books in the Bookshelf include When Marian Sang: The True Recital of Marian Anderson by Pam Muñoz Ryan, César ¡Sí, se puede! by Carmet T. Bernier-Grand (Spanish edition), and The Souls of Black Folk by W. E. B. DuBois.

Any U.S. public library or K-12 school library in the United States and its territories are eligible to apply to receive this Bookshelf. Please help to spread the word about this opportunity. Applications must be received by January 29, 2010.

National Book Festival this Saturday in Washington

Nine state humanities councils will be represented at the National Book Festival, September 26th, on the National Mall. The councils that are their state's Center for the Book accepted NEH's offer of $3,000 to help subsidize the expenses of their participation in the event. We're looking forward to seeing staffers from Colorado Humanities, Maine Humanities Council, Maryland Humanities Council, Minnesota Humanities Center, Humanities Montana, North Dakota Humanities Council, South Dakota Humanities Council, Humanities Tennessee, and Virginia Foundation for the Humanities.

Washington's weather on Saturday should be some sun and some clouds, with a high of 72°and a low of 58°. It will be a great day to be on the Mall.


FEDERAL/STATE PARTNERSHIP
National Endowment for the Humanities
1100 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, Suite 603
Washington, DC 20506
202.606.8254, main number
202.606.8365, fax

Edie Manza, director [about ]
202.606.8257
Kathleen Mitchell, senior program officer [ about ]
202.606.8302
Shirley Newman, program assistant [ about ]
202.606.8254

visit www.neh.gov to keep up with the
National Endowment for the Humanities

Federal/State Partnership is the liaison between the National Endowment for the Humanities and the nonprofit network of 56 state and jurisdictional humanities councils