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October 2011

the latest from
Suite 603

 


October 25, 2011

 

You learn on SQUEEZEBOX STORIES that the accordion is
the first "global instrument," that it is "the only instrument you hug,"
and that "it becomes part of your body."
You also learn that its mechanism has to be adapted to play Arab music.
SQUEEZEBOX STORIES is being broadcast on PRI's The World.
Hear accordion stories of an old master and his young apprentice and of
this instrument in California's Zydeco, Arab, and Oaxacan communities.

 

squeezeboxes
"The squeezebox is a great vehicle for telling immigration stories." Squeezebox Stories is funded by the California Council for the Humanities. Click on the image to hear the stories.

 
NEH at the National Humanities Conference
Making Sense of the American Civil War
Picturing America gives Maine youngsters a Head Start
The pleasure of this dance
Welcome Pat Williamsen, new executive of the Ohio Humanities Council

NEH at the National Humanities Conference

We look forward to seeing many of you next week in St. Petersburg. NEH staffers will participate in a number of sessions and workshops. Please make a point of chatting with as many of us as possible.

Thursday, November 3
10:00 am to 3:15 pm
Patti Van Tuyl, senior program officer, is one of the moderators of "Making Sense of the Civil War: Orientation to Statewide CW150 Programming," in the Grand Ballroom.

Friday, November 4
1:30-3:00 pm
Edie Manza, director of Federal/State Partnership, leads the orientation to NEH and Federal/State Partnership for new board members in Majestic 1B.
Kathleen Mitchell, senior program officer, Federal/State Partnership, moderates "Civility and the American Dream" in Majestic 1A. Panel members will be Ralph Lewin, California Council for the Humanities; Ken Egan, Humanities Montana; Brenda Thomson, Arizona Humanities Council; and Marcia Britton, Wyoming Humanities Council.
3:30-5:00
Laura Davis, Office of the Inspector General, "NEH Office of Inspector General (OIG) Annual Update" in Plaza A.
Jen Serventi, senior program officer in the Office of Digital Humanities, will speak in the session "Digital Communities: Reclaiming the Public Square?" in Majestic 2AB.

Saturday, November 5
8:00-9:30 am
Robert Straughter, grants guru of the Office of Grant Management, "NEH All-in-One Award Funding" in Majestic 1B.
Karen Mittelman, Deputy Director, Division of Public Programs, "NEH Public Programs Division: A Conversation" in Majestic 1A.
11:45-1:15
♦ Luncheon with NEH Chairman Jim Leach in the Grand Ballroom.

Be on the lookout as well for Carole Watson, NEH Deputy Chairman; Eva Caldera, Senior Advisor to the Chairman; Judy Havemann, Director of Communications; Courtney Chapin, White House and Congressional Liaison; Steve Ross, director, and Andrea Anderson, senior program officer, Office of Challenge Grants; and Malcolm Richardson, Senior Partnership Officer.

Making Sense of the American Civil War

Making Sense of the American Civil War is a five-part reading and discussion program presented by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the American Library Association's Public Programs Office. It is being launched at the National Humanities Conference with an orientation session on November 3rd. Most of the host organizations in 36 states and and the District of Columbia are state humanities councils.

The reading list, names of host organizations, and program resources and promotional materials are available on the Federal/State Partnership website. The program will run through 2013.

The national project scholar is Edward L. Ayers, President of the University of Richmond, historian of the American South, digital history pioneer, and former member of the National Council on the Humanities. Professor Ayers selected the reading materials and topics of conversation for the program. His essay sets the stage for Making Sense of the American Civil War.

Picturing America gives Maine youngsters a Head Start

The County Election by John Caleb Bingham helped these children and their teachers read books and talk about "a variety of topics, from hats around the world to the voting process."
The County Election by John Caleb Bingham helped these children and their teachers read books and talk about "a variety of topics, from hats around the world to the voting process."

Denise Pendleton, program director of the Maine Humanities Council's Born to Read program, writes about the impact of the Maine Humanities Council's collaboration with Maine's Head Start program, using NEH's Picturing America.

"It was the last Tuesday in May, when temperatures made the day feel like one of Maine’s dog days of August. At the Colby College Museum of Art there was a bustle of activity inside and out, amidst grateful exclamations for the air conditioning within. Museum docents were on hand, along with staff from the museum, the Maine Humanities Council, and Maine’s Head Start Quality Initiative all of whom came together to create a special Family Day at the Museum for Head Start families. Nearly 135 children, parents and grandparents, and local Head Start Program staff attended. The event was the culmination of several intensive training sessions for Head Start teachers on the Picturing America initiative of National Endowment for the Humanities.

"Programs similar to this one have been offered statewide through a Maine Humanities Council initiative created …" [read more]

The pleasure of this dance

Nancy Walker and Jef Savage demonstrate historic dances in "May I Have the Pleasure of this Dance?"
Nancy Walker and Jef Savage demonstrate historic dances in "May I Have the Pleasure of this Dance?"
 

The humanities has taken to the dance floor in Pennsylvania. Humanities on the Road, the Pennsylvania Humanities Council's speakers bureau and television series, includes an interactive presentation by dance historians Jef Savage and Nancy Walker.

They highlight social dance from the mid-1800s to the early 1900s. Waltzes, ragtime favorites, and the tango are re-created with attention to correct technique. Time also is given to discussing the significance of each dance and the fashions worn by men and women throughout history. The audience also dances.

Take a look at their presentation at the Humanities on the Road website that includes three videos.

Welcome Pat Williamsen, new executive of the Ohio Humanities Council

Over the summer Pat Williamsen became executive director of the Ohio Humanities Council, after having served as interim executive. Her experience with the Ohio Humanities Council is longstanding. She served as Assistant Director for Development and Public Relations from 1985-1993 and returned to the Council in 2002 as Director of Development. She began her career in nonprofit administration with the Ohio Humanities Council in 1984 as the half-time coordinator of OHC’s first Council-conducted project.

In addition to fundraising activities, Ms. Williamsen has advanced the Council’s mission by developing strategic partnerships for Council-conducted projects on civic reflection, heritage tourism, and history. Most recently, she directed “Images of the Great Depression: The New Deal in Ohio.”

Pat holds a B.A. degree in English from the University of Toledo and an M.A. in Film History and Theory from The Ohio State University. She has held a variety of administrative positions, including Executive Director of Community21, Columbus’ public access television station. An active photographer and writer, her work has been published in numerous journals and magazines; current projects include documenting street performers throughout the United States.


FEDERAL/STATE PARTNERSHIP
National Endowment for the Humanities
1100 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, Suite 603
Washington, DC 20506
202.606.8254, main number
202.606.8365, fax

Edie Manza, director [ about ]
202.606.8257
Kathleen Mitchell, senior program officer [ about ]
202.606.8302
Meg Ferris, program analyst [ about ]
202.208.7100
Shirley Newman, program assistant [ about ]
202.606.8254

directions to the Federal/State Partnership office

visit www.neh.gov to keep up with the
National Endowment for the Humanities

Federal/State Partnership is the liaison between the National Endowment for the Humanities and the nonprofit network of 56 state and jurisdictional humanities councils