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October 2008


the latest from
Suite 603

 


October 24, 2008

State Humanities Councils on the Air

Rhode Island Council for the Humanities hosted an NPR Tell Me More conversation with (left to right) host Michel Martin, RICH executive director Mary-Kim Arnold, and James Campbell, professor Africana Studies at Brown University.

Rhode Island Council for the Humanities hosted an NPR Tell Me More conversation with (left to right) host Michel Martin, RICH executive director Mary-Kim Arnold, and James Campbell, professor Africana Studies at Brown University. 

RICH's "On the Road to Freedom" on NPR's Tell Me More

Mass Moments: broadcast, email, podcast, online
VFH radio helps explain the electoral college ... and the whole tradition of voting in America

Utah history on the radio and online

"Hold this Thought"

... more great radio

Picturing America deadline extended to November 14
See you in Crystal City

the logon and password
for the Federal/State Partnership website:
"fedstate" & "partnership"

This website is a resource for executives, boards, and staff of state humanities councils. Join the Federal/State Partnership email list from the first page of the website.

RICH's "On the Road to Freedom" on NPR's Tell Me More

The Rhode Island Council for the Humanities has just completed a Freedom Festival to commemorate the bicentennial of the abolition of the slave trade. RICH hosted a reception and conversation led by Michel Martin of NPR's Tell Me More. Mary-Kim Arnold and James Campbell were joined by Katrina Browne, director, writer, and producer of the documentary Traces of the Trade, and the Rev. Jeffrey A. Williams, pastor at the Cathedral of Life church. This conversation later aired on WNRI. Listen to it and read the full schedule of festival events. 

Traces of the Trade was supported NEH's Division of Public Programs and by Mass Humanities as well as the by Rhode Island Council for the Humanities.

"On the Road to Freedom" is a We the People project.

Mass Moments: broadcast, email, podcast, online

"Mass Moments", a signature program of Mass Humanities, is a daily almanac of Massachusetts history. It currently plays in one-minute segments at least once a day on six radio stations. You can also hear it online. Listen to the piece on the Millerites for October 22.

"Mass Moments" is a We the People project.

VFH radio helps explain the electoral college ... and the whole tradition of voting in America

The Virginia Foundation for the Humanities' "Back Story with the American History Guys" recently aired Early and Often: Voting in America. We heard it on WAMU, Washington's NPR station, on October 19th while cooking dinner. The history guys are Peter Onuf, Thomas Jefferson Memorial Foundation Professor at the University of Virginia; Ed Ayers, president of the University of Richmond and former member of the National Council on the Humanities; and Brian Balough, Mayo Distinguished Teaching Professor at the University of Virginia.

Utah history on the radio and online

Utah's Beehive Archive, a program of the Utah Humanities Council, shows up on several radio stations each week. This two-minute spot looks "at some of the most pivotal—and peculiar—events in Utah history." Missed it on the radio? You can download (click on "download" and then scroll down the page) programs from the the Beehive Archive to your computer or iPod. Topics include "Women in Utah Politics," "Henry Adams Visits Utah," and "Land and Murder in Beaver County." The Beehive Archive's blog includes the scripts of a number of programs.

Beehive Archive is a We the People project.

"Hold this Thought"

Eudora Welty
Eudora Welty
The Alaska Humanities Forum supports three kinds of radio programming: general news programming on urban/rural issues on Koahnic Broadcasting (KNBA statewide) and Alaska Public Radio Network; "AK," a feature-style weekly on hour radio magazine that has won at least two national awards; and a new program, "Hold this Thought," a one-minute daily civic reflection piece on KSKA and founded by former AHF staffer and Leadership Anchorage director Barbara Brown. "Hold this Thought" is a combination radio program and blog—the website includes guidelines for submitting pieces. The October 23 program is about Eudora Welty's One Writer's Beginnings. Eudora Welty received a Charles Frankel Prize (now the National Humanities Medal) from the National Endowment for the Humanities in 1992.

... more great radio

The examples of council radio programming above are just illustrations of the ways councils use radio to reach millions of people. These examples demonstrate the range of topics which lend themselves to radio as well as the spin-offs of radio programming.

  • The South Dakota Humanities Council sponsored the national broadcast of NPR's "Wait, Wait ... Don't Tell Me," with guest Senator George McGovern, during the South Dakota Book Festival. It also sponsors the bi-weekly program "Food for Thought."
  • Humanities Montana regularly broadcasts events from its book festival—on this past weekend in Missoula. Check back to its website in the next week or two for information about the broadcasts. One program that will definitely be broadcast is the session by William Kittredge and Annick Smith, "The Last Best Place 20 Years Later." Supported by Humanities Montana, this collection came not only to define western literature but also Montana itself.
  • Each month Vermont Humanities Council Executive Director Peter Gilbert talks about the humanities on Vermont Public Radio. Check out his latest, "Wordsworth in the Tropics."
  • For fifteen years the Florida Humanities Council has broadcast statewide weekly on nine public radio stations, reaching an audience of about 100,000. Its five-minute programs are archived on the Council's website. The latest program is about "Ricardo Pau-Llosa, Exile Poet." 
  • Since 1997, the Michigan Humanities Council has collaborated with the Michigan Council for Arts and Cultural Affairs, Michigan Radio, and the Michigan Public Radio Network to produce the Arts and Humanities Radio Project. The reports can be heard on radio statewide as well as online. A recent program is about a letter press in northern Michigan.

Picturing America deadline extended to November 14

John James Audubon's American Flamingo (1838)
John James Audubon's American Flamingo (1838)

NEH has extended the deadline for schools and public libraries to apply for the Picturing America set of reproductions. The set includes 40 laminated large, high-quality reproductions of significant American art and a comprehensive teachers resource book with lesson ideas to facilitate the use of the images in all K-12 grade levels and subject areas. Here is the state-by-state list of institutions that have already received Picturing America.

Schools and libraries may apply for the program in a simple, online application process. School and library districts may also apply for every institution in their jurisdiction with one, single application. Details and instructions are available at PicturingAmerica.neh.gov.

To date, more than 26,000 schools and public libraries—representing an estimated 10 million K-12 students across all 50 states, the District of Columbia and five U.S. territories—have received Picturing America. Schools and public libraries submitting their applications prior to the new November 14 deadline will receive their Picturing America materials in spring 2009. Please note that previous recipients of the Picturing America collection are not eligible for a second award.

See you in Crystal City

Crystal City, Virginia
Crystal City, Virginia

All of us in Federal/State Partnership look forward to seeing you in a couple of weeks at the Federation conference across the river from Washington in Crystal City, VA.

Edie will present the orientation to NEH and Federal/State Partnership for new board members. Dwan and Kathleen will be involved with the Marketplace of Ideas—Dwan will discuss what we learn from councils' self-assessments and will be joined by Elizabeth Young, former chair of the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities and an NEH site visitor. Kathleen will moderate a session on the general liability insurance Federal/State Partnership provides the councils. She will be joined by Marvin Klein and Frank Serra from our insurance broker, McManus Serra Klein.

Several other NEH staffers will be involved in sessions. Chairman Bruce Cole will speak at the Saturday luncheon. Tom Phelps will talk about the Division of Public Programs; Nadina Gardner of the Division of Preservation and Access organized the session on the Bracero History Archive; Robert Straughter and Steve Veneziani will lead two sessions on the Office of Grant Management; Patti Van Tuyl is presenting a session on the ways we commemorate events in America; Sheldon Bernstein, Charles Garfinkel, and Laura Davis will discuss audits; Malcolm Richardson will be on a panel discussing foundations; and William Craig Rice moderates a panel on Picturing America and the state councils. 

We look forward as well to seeing Jamie Doggett at the conference. Jamie, a member of the National Council on the Humanities and the Federal/State Partnership Committee, has been chair of both the Federation and Humanities Montana.

For more information about Crystal City, read >>


FEDERAL/STATE PARTNERSHIP
National Endowment for the Humanities
1100 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, Suite 603
Washington, DC 20506
202.606.8254, main number
202.606.8365, fax

Edie Manza, director
202.606.8257
Kathleen Mitchell, senior program officer
202.606.8302
Shirley Newman, program assistant
202.606.8254
Dwan Reece, senior program officer
202.606.8266

visit www.neh.gov to keep up with the
National Endowment for the Humanities