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November 2010

the latest from
Suite 603

 


November 22, 2010

Oregon Humanities' Wheel of Cogitation, featured on the front page of the Federal/State Partnership website (logon fedstate password partnership). Click through to watch the video.
 
Let's make it viral: Tweet Federal/State Partnership your favorite words
"Cranberry Surprise": Thanksgiving stories from the Indiana Humanities Council

Bridging Cultures: learn more about the furthest flung of the 56 state and jurisdictional humanities councils

The Humanities Council of Washington, D.C. looks at the "World House" and Climate Change

NEH 2011 Seminars and Institutes for Teachers

Federal/State Partnership is now on Twitter
♦ Check out the Montana Authors Project
♦ The next application deadline for The Big Read is February 1, 2011

2010-2011 general liability insurance policies
Everything you need is there: www.neh.gov/partnership (login fedstate password partnership)

Let's make it viral: Tweet Federal/State Partnership your favorite words

To inaugurate its new Twitter account, Federal/State Partnership asks you to tweet us your favorite words. To find out what our favorite words are, you'll have to go to our page to look them up!

We need your help to make this Twitter site viral. Let's all work together to see just how big it can become. Tag Federal/State Partnership in your tweets by adding @NEH_FedState. Then, send us (either Kathleen Mitchell or Meg Ferris) your stories and we'll tweet them out to an ever-expanding audience.

"Cranberry Surprise": Thanksgiving stories from the Indiana Humanities Council

"She set the last dish which was the cranberries on to the table and gave a sigh of relief; she was finally finished! Everyone started coming. The food smelled wonderful, the table looked beautiful, and finally everyone arrived. Everyone sat down to the beautiful table and started eating all the food. It was delicious until the first person ate the cranberries and quietly gagged. They looked around and everyone’s eyes connected with strange looks on their faces. Granny noticed and said, 'What’s wrong?'

"Being polite, they all said, 'Nothing.'

"Granny then said, 'Oh, come on, guys, tell me. I can tell something is wrong.' Uncle Guy opened his mouth to tell her, and out came a … " [read more]

Bridging Cultures: learn more about the furthest flung of the 56 state and jurisdictional humanities councils



Dancers portrayed in the Virgin Islands presentation.

Dancers portrayed in the Virgin Islands presentation.

Federal/State Partnership hosted a session at the Federation conference about "Bridging Cultures within the network of State Humanities Councils." Moderated by Kathleen Mitchell, the session highlighted the work of the four most far-flung humanities councils.

Each of these councils serves populations and cultures which are unique and complicated internally, while also dealing with the broad national/western culture of the mainland/lower 48. Each of these councils represents a state or jurisdiction with indigenous cultures as well as many diverse cultures. In many ways these councils are some of the most cutting-edge councils because they "bridge cultures" every day.

The Amerika Samoa Humanities Council is the southernmost council and the only one south of the equator, the Northern Mariana Islands Council for the Humanities is the furthest west (or east, depending on your perspective), the Alaska Humanities Forum is the northernmost, and the U.S. Virgin Islands Humanities Council is the easternmost.

Learn more about these councils and the people and cultures they serve by looking at the presentation materials used in the session. These materials have been posted on the Federal/State Partnership website in the section on council activities (logon fedstate password partnership). Look under "Councils at Work."

The Humanities Council of Washington, D.C. looks at the "World House" and Climate Change

The Humanities Council of Washington, D.C. has just concluded its annual World House Series, focusing this year on global climate change.

The World House Series focuses Washington, D.C. residents' attention on the important cultural and historical intersections that exist between their city and the international community. The program is inspired by Martin Luther King, Jr.'s concept of a "World House" shared by all citizens of the world, each charged with the responsibility of protecting it, and making it a better place to live.

Held in four places in the city, one in each quadrant, the topics of presentation and discussion were "Local Solutions to a Global Challenge - Envisioning a Sustainable District," "Moral Dilemma - Is Going Green a Choice Between Right and Wrong?," "Caring for the World House - A Shared Responsibility as Citizens and a Community," and "Green is the New Black - Eco-consciousness is in Style."

The series drew in panelists from fields of international diplomacy, religion, politics, and nutrition, among others.

NEH 2011 Seminars and Institutes for Teachers

 Sustainability and the Humanities," will be held in Flagstaff, AZ, June 20 to July 15, 2011.
Aldo Leopold. The NEH Summer Institute for College and University Faculty, "Rethinking the Land Ethic: Sustainability and the Humanities," will be held in Flagstaff, AZ, June 20 to July 15, 2011.

During the summer of 2011 NEH is offering Summer Seminars and Institutes for School Teachers, Summer Seminars and Institutes for College and University Teachers, Landmarks of American History and Culture Workshops for School Teachers, and Landmarks of American History and Culture Workshops for Community College Faculty. The application deadline for participants in all these seminars, institutes, and workshops is March 1, 2011.

"Jump at the Sun: Zora Neale Hurston and Her Eatonville Roots" is offered by the Florida Humanities Council as a Landmarks Workshop for School Teachers. Click to see the full offering of summer teacher development programs.


FEDERAL/STATE PARTNERSHIP
National Endowment for the Humanities
1100 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, Suite 603
Washington, DC 20506
202.606.8254, main number
202.606.8365, fax

Edie Manza, director [ about ]
202.606.8257
Kathleen Mitchell, senior program officer [ about ]
202.606.8302
Meg Ferris, program analyst [ about ]
202.208.7100
Shirley Newman, program assistant [ about ]
202.606.8254

directions to the Federal/State Partnership office

visit www.neh.gov to keep up with the
National Endowment for the Humanities

Federal/State Partnership is the liaison between the National Endowment for the Humanities and the nonprofit network of 56 state and jurisdictional humanities councils