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May 2013

the latest from Suite 603

May 15, 2013

Outgoing Chair Jim Leach and Acting Chair Carole Watson with the ten new executives of state humanities councils at NEH on May 2.
Federal/State Partnership hosts new council executives
Time travel, Kentucky Humanities Council style
"We all have a very strong case for philanthropic support"
"How can we model the behavior we seek to inspire?" State humanities councils, migration, and immigration
Department of Useful Information: mine NEH data for grants made to your state

Federal/State Partnership hosts new council executives

 Adam Davis, OR; Tim Henderson, TN; Paula Watkins, NC; Patricia Williamsen, OH; Jim Leach; Elizabeth Francis, RI; Nina Kemppel, AK; Carole Watson; Armand de Keyser, AL; Erik Nordberg, MI; Hayden Anderson, ME; Laurie Zierer, PA
L-R: Adam Davis, OR; Tim Henderson, TN; Paula Watkins, NC; Patricia Williamsen, OH; Jim Leach; Elizabeth Francis, RI; Nina Kemppel, AK; Carole Watson; Armand de Keyser, AL; Erik Nordberg, MI; Hayden Anderson, ME; Laurie Zierer, PA

Ten new council executives came to the Old Post Office on May 2 to get acquainted with Federal/State Partnership and its work, to meet the staff and work of NEH, and to enjoy brainstorming and good conversation.

Outgoing NEH Chair Jim Leach and now Acting Chair Carole Watson spent time with the new EDs. Especially because of his Civility Tour when he visited every state in the union, councils are special to Jim. His latest speech, "STEM and the Humanities: a False Dichotomy," makes clear his love of the humanities. Carole said how thrilled she had been to begin working at NEH as a program officer in the Division of State Programs, the precedessor of Federal/State Partnership. She was director of State Programs for several years.

READ to find out more about their day at NEH and the energy and passion they bring to their work.

Time travel, Kentucky Humanities Council style

Saturday, May 4, 2013 – Kentucky Derby Weekend. Speaker of the House John Boehner meets former Speaker of the House Henry Clay at Henry Clay’s Ashland Estate, Lexington. Kentucky Chautauqua’s Henry Clay, portrayed by George McGee, is one of the Kentucky Humanities Council’s longest running presentations. The two speakers had much to talk about.

Photo by Alex Orlov.

"We all have a very strong case for philanthropic support"

Read on the various "hum" emails ...

[April 5] Chris Sommerich, Nebraska Humanities, responding to Edie Manza’s email “Subject: No details available yet on FY 2013 general support funding”: I am grateful that our council has not stalled despite this delay of NEH funding. We have private donations, endowment funds, and 8 months of operating reserves. This has been built up over nearly two decades, and now our culture of philanthropy nurtures itself and continues to grow. All councils have a very strong case for philanthropic support and we ALL can get there!

[April 15] Kathleen Gardner, Utah Humanities Council: Are corporations mainly taking care of themselves?

[April 15] Rachel Dutcher, Humanities Council of Washington, DC: Corporate support tends to be local and insular. Board members may have connections you know nothing about. Ask key questions. What bank do they use? Do they know construction firms? Do they work with consultants?

[April 16] Kristen Fuhs Wells, Indiana Humanities: For us it’s all about local companies and finding someone who knows someone to make an introduction.

For more complete messages—Kristen gives a lot of examples—read more >>

"How can we model the behavior we seek to inspire?" State humanities councils, migration, and immigration

Sandhill cranes migrating through Nebraska.
Sandhill cranes migrating through Nebraska.

A series based on the Federation of State Humanities Councils' 2013 conference theme of inclusion. This series surveys the challenges the 56 councils face as they confront such issues as geography, educational and cultural resources, audiences, and philanthropy in their work. Previous articles in this series are available online.

The four largest states—California, Texas, New York, and Florida—experience the largest number of people moving to them from other states. In 2011, California, Texas, and Florida each welcomed more than half a million Americans on the move; New York, around 300,000. Current U.S. migration patterns include shifting generational distribution as well as people moving within states, often from the country to the city.

The 2010 census indicates that 40 million people, 13% of the U.S. population, are foreign born. Most come from Latin America and the Caribbean (53%), followed by Asia (28%). As you will see from the examples of the councils in Florida, Kansas, California, New Hampshire, Guam, and Puerto Rico, many of the states and jurisdictions are home to immigrants from many countries and language groups. Puerto Ricans play a key role by moving into the continental U.S.

A challenge for councils is how to keep pace with the changing populations they are designed to serve; how do they listen to, learn from, and engage with ... read more >>

Department of Useful Information: mine NEH data for grants made to your state

Thanks to Alaska Humanities Forum's Nina Kemppel for asking how to find out the grants NEH has made to Alaska. The NEH website gives you access to this information. If you enter the name of your state or jurisdiction in the box for the state, and then enter the time frame you want, the list of NEH grants made there will pop up. You can also export the list to Excel.

For easy copying, here's the url: https://securegrants.neh.gov/publicquery/main.aspx.

 

FEDERAL/STATE PARTNERSHIP
National Endowment for the Humanities
1100 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, Suite 603
Washington, DC 20506
202.606.8254, main number
202.606.8365, fax

Edie Manza, director [ about ]
202.606.8257
Kathleen Mitchell, senior program officer [ about ]
202.606.8302
Meg Ferris, program analyst [ about ]
202.208.7100
Shirley Newman, program assistant [ about ]
202.606.8254

directions to the National Endowment for the Humanities and Federal/State Partnership

visit www.neh.gov to keep up with the
National Endowment for the Humanities

Federal/State Partnership is the liaison between the National Endowment for the Humanities and the nonprofit network of 56 state and jurisdictional humanities councils

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