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January 2008


the latest from
Suite 603

 


January 22, 2008

 (from top left, clockwise) "People Can Make Fences" by Legarto, "Crossing" by Patrick Brawley, the exhibition, "Southwest Gate" by Francis and Diane Carnright

Images from BETWEEN FENCES in Ajo, Arizona: (from top left, clockwise) "People Can Make Fences" by Legarto, "Crossing" by Patrick Brawley, the BETWEEN FENCES exhibition, "Southwest Gate" by Francis and Diane Carnright

Arizona Humanities Council launches BETWEEN FENCES visual archive
Peaceable Stories: Conflict Resolution Through the Humanities—the Maine Humanities Council's new initiative

Illinois Humanities Council on radio and web

Is your contact information up to date on the Federal/State Partnership website?
Get the word out: application deadlines for the We the People bookshelf & NEH summer seminars and institutes for teachers
"Peak Performance: Nonprofit Leaders Rate Highest in 360-Degree Reviews" 

the logon and password
for the Federal/State Partnership website:
"fedstate" & "partnership"

This website is a resource for executives, boards, and staff of state humanities councils. Join the Federal/State Partnership email list from the first page of the website.

Arizona Humanities Council launches BETWEEN FENCES visual archive



A local mariachi band performs at the opening of BETWEEN FENCES at the PimerĂ­a Alta Historical Society in Nogales, AZ, October 14, 2007.

A local mariachi band performs at the opening of BETWEEN FENCES at the Pimería Alta Historical Society in Nogales, AZ, October 14, 2007.

A joint project of the Arizona Humanities Council, the Winslow Historical Society/Old Trails Museum, and SNOWDRIFT Art Space, a new visual archive documents the Between Fences project in Arizona through photographs and text. Read and see more >>

BETWEEN FENCES can also be seen in Nebraska, Wisconsin, Wyoming, and North Dakota.

Other Museum on Main Street exhibits can be seen now in museums and historical societies in Ohio, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, and New Mexico (KEY INGREDIENTS); and in Washington (NEW HARMONIES).

Read more about the Museum on Main Street >>

Peaceable Stories: Conflict Resolution Through the Humanities—the Maine Humanities Council's new initiative

Sara Boilard reads to children in her classroom at Portland, ME, YMCA Child Care.
Sara Boilard reads to children in her classroom at Portland, ME, YMCA Child Care.

We want to share with you this story from the January 2008 issue of the Maine Humanities Council's "Notes from an Open Book":

In 2001, the MHC was holding a reading and discussion program in Hallowell, Maine, with probationers recently released from prison. The men had first been uncomfortable with the humanities model of reading and discussion, which insists upon equal exchange for all members of the group and thoughtful exploration of ideas, but gradually learned to disagree respectfully with one another and speak openly. Following the final session, one participant told a MHC staff member that the discussion series had changed his life. He told her that he had been contemplating killing someone to solve a conflict in his life, but as a result of the readings and discussions, he realized that violence was not the best or only way of dealing with even the most challenging problems. ...

The capacity of reading and discussion programs to make significant differences created a new initiative at the MHC called Peaceable Stories: Conflict Resolution Through the Humanities. This project, funded by a $225,000 three-year grant from Jane’s Trust, will bring discussions with a conflict resolution theme to child care workers for use in under-five classrooms, domestic abuse victims and their children, people living in poverty or rural isolation, and people in Maine’s prisons and jails.

Read more in MHC's winter newsletter >>

Illinois Humanities Council on radio and web

Voices: A Collection of Illinois Stories, a one-hour special featuring  programs of the Illinois Humanities Council, will air Tuesday, February 5th, at 10:45 pm and Saturday, February 23rd, at 4:45 pm on 98.7 WMFT. Voices is also available on web streaming.

IHC's series of public forums, "Future Perfect: Conversations on the Meaning of the Genetics Revolution," can be seen online

Is your contact information up to date on the Federal/State Partnership website?

Please review the information about your organization at www.neh.gov/partnership/contacts/councilcontacts.htm. Check especially the name and email of your board chair. Executives might want to make sure that their bios are current. Email updated information to Shirley Newman. Thanks.

Get the word out: application deadlines for the We the People bookshelf & NEH summer seminars and institutes for teachers

The last day to apply for the "Created Equal" bookshelf is January 25.
The last day to apply for the "Created Equal" bookshelf is January 25.

January 25 is the last day to apply for the "Created Equal" We the People bookshelf.

The deadlines for participant applications to NEH-supported summer seminars and institutes are fast approaching. 
 
* for bookshelf guidelines and application >>
* for more about the "Created Equal" bookshelf >>
* for 2008 seminars and institutes and other NEH projects >>

"Peak Performance: Nonprofit Leaders Rate Highest in 360-Degree Reviews" 

A study written by Jean R. Lobell and Paul M. Connolly in the winter 2007 issue of The Nonprofit Quarterly demonstrates that nonprofit leaders "received higher ratings than for-profit leaders based on feedback from direct reports, managers, peers, and a category called 'others.'" The article is posted in the nonprofit resources section of the Federal/State Partnership website.

Read the article >>


FEDERAL/STATE PARTNERSHIP
National Endowment for the Humanities
1100 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, Suite 603
Washington, DC 20506
202.606.8254, main number
202.606.8365, fax

Edie Manza, director
202.606.8257
Kathleen Mitchell, senior program officer
202.606.8302
Shirley Newman, program assistant
202.606.8254
Dwan Reece, senior program officer
202.606.8266

visit www.neh.gov to keep up with the
National Endowment for the Humanities