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February 2008


the latest from
Suite 603

 


February 21, 2008

Alaska Humanities Forum receives $1M grant from the Rasmuson Foundation
Deadlines deadlines deadlines: get the word out about national teacher seminars sponsored by state humanities councils
More deadlines: We the People grants for state humanities councils
We're looking forward to seeing you during Humanities on the Hill

Picturing America launch

the logon and password
for the Federal/State Partnership website:
"fedstate" & "partnership"

This website is a resource for executives, boards, and staff of state humanities councils. Join the Federal/State Partnership email list from the first page of the website.

Alaska Humanities Forum receives $1M grant from the Rasmuson Foundation

Federal/State Partnership and the National Endowment for the Humanities congratulates the Alaska Humanities Forum for its receipt of a $1,000,000 grant from the Rasmuson Foundation to support the Alaska Statehood Experience.

The ASE program encourages creative exploration of all aspects of Alaska’s journey to statehood. Eligible projects include: Media, Public Meetings/Exhibits, Oral History, Research, Planning, and Creative Expression. A blue-ribbon panel of outstanding Alaskans will review proposals and make awards.

The Alaska Statehood Experience is also supported by NEH's We the People program.

Deadlines deadlines deadlines: get the word out about national teacher seminars sponsored by state humanities councils

Minnesota's Iron Range
Minnesota's Iron Range

Application deadlines to apply for teacher development summer seminars are quickly approaching. The seminars listed below are sponsored by state humanities councils and available to teachers from around the country. They are all We the People projects.

  • Building America: Minnesota’s Iron Range, U.S. Industrialization, and the Creation of World Power: applications due March 18 
    Minnesota’s Iron Range supplied late 19th and 20th century America with the iron needed to fuel industrialization, economic expansion, and military might. The history of the Iron Range tells the history of America; it is the story of immigrants, of conflict and assimilation, of people creating lives for themselves, their families, and for others. It is a story about industrial America and U.S. military build-ups in the first and second world wars.
    More information >>
  • Roots 2008: Teaching the African Dimensions of the History and Culture of the America (Through the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade): applications due March 3
    Participants will include 15 teachers from all over the United States with teaching and/or professional responsibilities that they wish to enhance with greater knowledge of Africa, the Middle Passage, and the people who arrived here in North America in slavery.  They will do so by developing projects of their own choosing involving early Atlantic history, literature, or culture up to and including the early nineteenth century.
    More information >>
  • Jump at the Sun: Zora Neale Hurston and her Eatonville Roots: applications due March 17
    Just ten miles north of Orlando, Eatonville lies in the shadow of the world’s largest theme park. Surrounded by five lakes and acres of orange groves, the oldest incorporated black municipality in the United States is where Zora Neale Hurston (1891-1960), writer, folklorist, anthropologist, and arguably the most significant collector and interpreter of Southern African-American culture spent her childhood. It was a “pure Negro town…where the only white folks were those who passed through,” Hurston wrote about the town, which provided the folktales, characters, and events that inspired her literary works and folklore expeditions.
    More information >>
  • Women's Suffrage on the Western Frontier: applications due March 17
    Imagine living in South Pass City in 1869, a gold mining town with a half-mile main street, five hotels, three meat markets, two bakeries, four law firms, thirteen saloons and other businesses that served 460 citizens. This was the residence for both the legislator who introduced the new Wyoming Territory’s women’s suffrage bill and for the first woman justice of the peace in the U.S., Esther Hobart Morris.
    More information >>

More deadlines: We the People grants for state humanities councils

Mark your calendars for the two application deadlines for the 2008 We the People grants: March 18, 2008 and May 1, 2008.

Here is the memo Federal/State Partnership director, Edie Manza, sent on February 19 about the We the People deadlines:

February 19, 2008

MEMORANDUM

TO: Executive Directors, State Humanities Councils

FROM: Edie Manza, Director, Federal/State Partnership

ABOUT: We the People Application Guidelines for State Humanities Councils

I am very pleased to announce that the application guidelines for We the People: Project Grants for State Humanities Councils are now available on the NEH website. The URL is

http://grants.neh.gov/Fedstate/

The entire application -- cover sheet, project description, and budget -- will be submitted online. Each council will need a password to submit its application.

We the People: Project Grants for State Humanities Councils support programs sponsored by state humanities councils that explore significant events and themes in American history and culture, and that advance knowledge of the principles that define America. Councils are encouraged to think of new ways to explore themes related to We the People and how their existing programs can advance the initiative. State humanities councils have wide latitude to design projects for this initiative -- regarding both formats and audiences -- and funds may support more than one project.

Federal/State Partnership is well aware that NEH has not given you much advance notice about the availability of $5,000 for Picturing America. If your council has a plan for Picturing America activities by the time you are ready to submit the application, please include details of the plan within your project narrative. If your council does not yet have a plan, please include the paragraph below at the end of your project narrative.

Picturing America ($5,000) - Expenses for programming may include, among others, program development, consultant fees, honoraria and travel, books and other materials, publication development and dissemination, audio-visual materials, web-sites, promotional materials, professional development for teachers, student projects, exhibitions, partnership opportunities and re-grant awards.

The funds awarded for Picturing America should be included in the budget breakdown and in the project budget.

As most of you know by now, We the People: Project Grants for State Humanities Councils are distinct from Federal/State Partnership's general support grants for the councils. We the People grants must adhere to the 'General Terms and Conditions for Awards to Organizations' and not the 'General Terms and Conditions for General Support Grants to State Humanities Councils.' Please note that some of these provisions are different than the ones outlined for a state humanities council's general operating support. You will find a copy of the 'General Terms and Conditions for Awards to Organizations' on the NEH website:

http://www.neh.gov/manage/gtcao.html

There will be two deadlines, March 18, 2008 and May 1, 2008. Councils applying to the March deadline will hear from NEH following the May meeting of the National Council on the Humanities. Applications submitted by the May 1st deadline will be reviewed at the July meeting of the National Council. Grant periods may run from twelve to eighteen months.

If you have any comments or questions, please do not hesitate to call our office at 202.606.8254 or to send an email to fedstate@neh.gov.

We're looking forward to seeing you during Humanities on the Hill

Here's an overview of the territory you'll be covering next week. Wear comfortable shoes.
Here's an overview of the territory you'll be covering next week. Wear comfortable shoes.

The highlights of our year are when we get to see a lot of you all at once. That happens at the annual humanities conference in November and then in the spring (we'll try to consider February spring, although it's snowing outside right now) when you come for Humanities on the Hill. If Edie, Dwan, Kathleen, and Shirley are not able to talk with each of you in person, please know that that is our goal.

We will also welcome the executive directors who have begun their work in the last year. Paul Austin, Arkansas Humanities Council;  Sara Ogger, New York Humanities Council; Shelley Crisp, North Carolina Humanities Council; Sherry DeBoer, North Dakota Humanities Council; Cara Ungar-Gutierrez, Oregon Council for the Humanities; Mary-Kim Arnold, Rhode Island Council for the Humanities; and Dena Wortzel, Wisconsin Humanities Council. They will stay on in Washington through Friday noon for orientation meetings with the Federation of State Humanities Councils (Wednesday and Thursday) and here at NEH with Federal/State Partnership (Thursday and Friday). Ralph Lewin, California Council for the Humanities, will not be able to stay for the orientation sessions, but will meet with us earlier in the week.

Picturing America launch

Keep checking the NEH website for more information about this new We the People initiative.
More information >>


FEDERAL/STATE PARTNERSHIP
National Endowment for the Humanities
1100 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, Suite 603
Washington, DC 20506
202.606.8254, main number
202.606.8365, fax

Edie Manza, director
202.606.8257
Kathleen Mitchell, senior program officer
202.606.8302
Shirley Newman, program assistant
202.606.8254
Dwan Reece, senior program officer
202.606.8266

visit www.neh.gov to keep up with the
National Endowment for the Humanities