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August 2013

the latest from Suite 603

August 19, 2013

"From sea to shining sea" NEH-funded projects support veterans

NEH presented a Capitol Hill briefing about humanities projects that serve veterans. From combat to the classroom, NEH is helping veterans and their families process the homecoming experience and transition to college and the workforce. Click on the image to link to NEH impact reports.

New Mexico Art Through Time
Ave atque vale / Hail and farewell
"Let's Get Lost": NEH supports San Francisco walking tour app
“How can we model the behavior we seek to inspire?” State humanities councils and indigenous peoples

MORE ABOUT THE HUMANITIES
*The New Georgia Encyclopedia is even newer!
*The Alaska Humanities Forum has $1M to fund Anchorage's centennial humanities events and projects, thanks to the Rasmuson Foundation and the municipality of Anchorage.
* The Humanities Council of Washington, DC hosts Andrew Young August 26 to honor the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington.
* Jamil Zainaldin's and Kathleen Mitchell's histories of the public humanities are in the Resource Library.

New Mexico Art Through Time

 James Stovall Morris, LIGHTENING, ca. 1940

James Stovall Morris, LIGHTENING, ca. 1940
On long term loan to the New Mexico Museum of Art, New Mexico from the U.S. General Services Administration, Works Project Administration, 1477.23P

"It's About Time: 14,000 Years of Art in New Mexico" is on exhibit at the New Mexico Museum of Art through November 20, 2013. The New Mexico Humanities Council is a primary funder. The NMHC also supported publication of the accompanying book, New Mexico Art Through Time. Prehistory to the Present, by Joseph Traugott. James Stovall Morris' "Lightening" is an example of New Mexico WPA art in the book. Traugott, curator of Twentieth-Century Art at the New Mexico Museum of Art, states that "New Mexico Art Through Time includes works that were intended to be art by their makers, as well as objects that ultimately became art through metamorphosis."

The exhibition and the book are part of the 2012 centennial commemoration of New Mexico statehood. A traveling version of the exhibition will be on display at the Herzstein Memorial Museum in Clayton, NM, through August 29th. NMHC executive director Craig Newbill chaired the statewide Centennial Steering Committee. Read more on the Federal/State Partnership website.

Ave atque vale / Hail and farewell

 Ben Chandler, Adam Davis, Paula Watkins, Shannon Smith
Clockwise from top left: Ben Chandler, Adam Davis, Paula Watkins, Shannon Smith

Welcome to Ben Chandler (Kentucky Humanities Council), Adam Davis (Oregon Humanities), Shannon Smith (Wyoming Humanities Council), and Paula Watkins (North Carolina Humanities Council). This summer they have joined the unique circle of state humanities council executives.

Ben represented Kentucky's 6th congressional district from 2004-2013; Adam was executive director of the Center for Civic Reflection in Chicago and taught in the Illinois Humanities Council's Odyssey Project; Shannon is an award-winning author and historian of the West who taught at Oglala Lakota College on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota; and Paula was Assistant Director of Humanities SC and directed its book festival.

We also bid fond adieux to long-time executives Virginia Carter (KHC), Cara Ungar (OH), Marcia Britton (WHC), and Shelly Crisp (NHHC).

"Let's Get Lost": NEH supports San Francisco walking tour app

The New Deal meets the 21st century in KQED's "Let's Get Lost" walking tour mobile app.

The New Deal meets the 21st century in KQED's "Let's Get Lost" walking tour mobile app.

Cal Humanities' president Ralph Lewin spoke at Rincon Annex, San Francisco's former central Post Office, during the launch of KQED's "Let's Get Lost" app for iPhone, iPad, and Android. This walking tour app features “The New Deal Murals of San Francisco” and includes WPA murals in the Rincon Annex and at Coit Tower as well as the "unexpected" Diego Rivera masterpiece at City College of San Francisco. NEH's Division of Public Programs supported this project, of which this app is the first installment.

Ralph emailed Public Programs Director Karen Mittelman and Program Officer Marc Ruppel to thank them "for inviting me to speak on behalf of NEH. I think this is a great way to put a human face on the agency. I would be happy to do this again. Also, I’m certain that my other colleagues around the country would welcome such an opportunity." Ralph talked about the importance of history, ideas and the imagination and how NEH supports the best of these qualities in projects across the nation. He notes that "KQED representatives were ... excited because they feel that they’ve developed the technical infrastructure to build more apps with humanities content." Ralph wrote that, although he didn't talk with them about this, he wonders "how this could be shared with other PBS/NPR affiliates?"

“How can we model the behavior we seek to inspire?” State humanities councils and indigenous peoples

The Oklahoma Humanities Council supported the Five Tribes Story Conference in Muskogee
The Oklahoma Humanities Council supported the Five Tribes Story Conference in Muskogee.

The mission of the 56 state and jurisdictional humanities councils is to provide “adequate”—the term used in the founding legislation—public humanities programming for the populations they serve. This includes efforts to serve as many of the various resident groups as is feasible. Many states have sizeable Native American communities; all are home to native people. Outreach is achieved in numerous ways. Some provide programming that explores native history and culture as well as programming developed specifically for native communities that addresses their interests and concerns. Some councils have people of native origin on their staffs and boards. Native representatives serve as project directors and as humanities experts to advise projects with council support. For three of the four Pacific Island councils (in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, and American Samoa), indigenous cultures are key to everyday life. The work of the Hawai’i Council for the Humanities is very much influenced throughout by native Hawai’ian history and culture.

The full article on state humanities councils and indigeous peoples, provides examples of the indigenous contexts in which eight councils work. The Amerika Samoa Humanities Council and the Northern Marianas Humanities Council serve predominantly indigeous populations. The program emphases of the Minnesota Humanities Center, the Alaska Humanities Forum, and the Oklahoma Humanities Council are shaped by the native populations they serve. The New Mexico Humanities Council and the North Carolina Humanities Council operate in states with growing native populations. Although the indigenous peoples of the U.S. Virgin Islands no longer exist as they do elsewhere in the country, the Virgin Islands Humanities Council serves communities of people with many of the characteristics of the other islands states and territories, especially with regard to the preservation of long-standing cultural characteristics in the face of outside influences.

Read more >>
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This series is based on the Federation of State Humanities Councils' 2013 conference theme of inclusion. This series surveys the challenges the 56 councils face as they confront such issues as geography, educational and cultural resources, audiences, and philanthropy in their work.

 

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