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Office of Communications and Public Affairs

The Office of Communications and Public Affairs represents the National Endowment for the Humanities in communications with the media and members of the public. Its mission is to disseminate information about NEH grant programs and products and to promote the importance of the humanities our country’s cultural advancement and in enriching the lives of its citizens.

The Office of Communications and Public Affairs publishes news releases and other information, works with the news media to keep them informed of the work of the agency and its grantees, manages the agency’s website and social media, and publishes announcements of NEH grants. The office also responds to media requests, arranges interviews with NEH staff, and coordinates major NEH public events, including the National Humanities Medals and the annual Jefferson Lecture in the Humanities.

To reach NEH’s Office of Communications and Public Affairs, please contact:

telephone: 202-606-8446
email: info@neh.gov

To find the Grantee Communication Toolkit click here

Recent News

Malinda Lowery

Q&A with NEH Public Scholar Malinda Lowery

NEH Public Scholar discusses her book, The Lumbee Indians: An American Struggle
Philip Dray

Q&A with NEH Public Scholar Philip Dray

Philip Dray discusses his NEH Public Scholar project on the history of hunting in America
One World Trade Center: Biography of the Building by Judith Dupré

Q&A with NEH Public Scholar Judith Dupré

NEH Public Scholar Judith Dupré discusses her "biography" of One World Trade Center
Gregg Hecimovich

Q&A with NEH Public Scholar Gregg Hecimovich

NEH Public Scholar Gregg Hecimovich uncovers the identity of fugitive slave and first African-American woman novelist, author of the 1850s novel The Bondwoman’s Narrative
August 30, 2016

Stark Decency: New Hampshire's World War II German Prisoner of War Camp

During World War II, 300 German prisoners of war were held at Camp Stark near the village of Stark in New Hampshire's North Country. Allen Koop reveals the history of this camp, which tells us much about our country's war experience and about our state.  

August 24, 2016

The Music History of French-Canadians, Franco-Americans, Acadians, and Cajuns

Lucie Therrien follows the migration of French-Canadians and the evolution of their traditional music:  its arrival in North America from France; the music's crossing with Indian culture during the evangelization of Acadia and Quebec; its growth alongside English culture after British colonization; and its expansion from Quebec to New England, as well as from Acadia to Louisiana. 

August 21, 2016

Lafayette and the Farewell Tour: An American Idol

General Lafayette, born the Marquis de Lafayette in Auvergne, France, was truly an American Idol in the 19th century. One proof is that more than 80 American counties, cities, towns, and countless roads were named in his honor, from Lafayette Road in Portsmouth to Mount Lafayette in Franconia. Lafayette's extraordinary reputation was based on his military record in the Revolution, his friendship with George Washington, his continued support of American interests, his story-book life, and perhaps most importantly, his Farewell Tour of America when he visited all 24 states and Washington D.C. as the last surviving major general of the Continental Army.

August 16, 2016

Home Ground on Yellowstone Public Radio

Home Ground’s guests tell us who they are, what they think and what they are doing about it. Those diverse stories help us to think more deeply – about what we believe and why.

August 14, 2016

New England's Colonial Meetinghouses and their Impact on American Society

New England's colonial meetinghouses embody an important yet little-known chapter in American history. Built mostly with tax money, they served as both places of worship and places for town meetings, and were the centers of life in colonial New England communities.

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