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Office of Communications and Public Affairs

The Office of Communications and Public Affairs represents the National Endowment for the Humanities in communications with the media and members of the public. Its mission is to disseminate information about NEH grant programs and products and to promote the importance of the humanities our country’s cultural advancement and in enriching the lives of its citizens.

The Office of Communications and Public Affairs publishes news releases and other information, works with the news media to keep them informed of the work of the agency and its grantees, manages the agency’s website and social media, and publishes announcements of NEH grants. The office also responds to media requests, arranges interviews with NEH staff, and coordinates major NEH public events, including the National Humanities Medals and the annual Jefferson Lecture in the Humanities.

To reach NEH’s Office of Communications and Public Affairs, please contact:

telephone: 202-606-8446
email: communications@neh.gov

To find the Grantee Communication Toolkit click here

Recent News

Presidents and the Press: A Pulitzer Centennial Event

Presidents and the Press: A Pulitzer Centennial Event

20 NEH-Funded Films To Watch This Summer

NEH has opened new worlds of learning with noteworthy films

Expanding Our Current Scope | NDNP

NEH & LOC announce the expansion of the chronological scope of the National Digital Newspaper Program

William Craig Rice, Farewell

NEH remembers Director of Division of Education Programs

Learning the Humanities through Video Games

NEH Chairman Adams to speak at 2016 Games For Change festival.
November 29, 2016

Stark Decency: New Hampshire's World War II German Prisoner of War Camp

During World War II, 300 German prisoners of war were held at Camp Stark near the village of Stark in New Hampshire's North Country. Allen Koop reveals the history of this camp, which tells us much about our country's war experience and about our state.  

November 28, 2016

Reading with WA State Poet Laureate

The Spokane Valley Library hosts a reading with Tod Marshall, the Washington State Poet Laureate. Marshall, a poet and professor at Gonzaga University, is the author most recently of Bugle(2014), which won the Washington State Book Award in 2015. He is also the author of two previous collections, Dare Say (2002) and The Tangled Line (2009), and a collection of interviews with contemporary poets, Range of the Possible (2002).

The Washington State Poet Laureate serves to build awareness and appreciation of poetry through public readings, workshops, lectures and presentations in communities, schools, colleges, universities, and other public settings in geographically diverse areas of the state.

November 19, 2016

Kansas United Methodist Resources Digitization Project

Learn about a multi-month preservation project to digitize and make available online United Methodist Church documents from Kansas dating back to the 19th century. 

November 18, 2016

Rally Round the Flag: The American Civil War Through Folksong

Woody Pringle and Marek Bennett present an overview of the American Civil War through the lens of period music. Audience members participate and sing along as the presenters explore lyrics, documents, and visual images from sources such as the Library of Congress. Through camp songs, parlor music, hymns, battlefield rallying cries, and fiddle tunes, Pringle and Bennett examine the folksong as a means to enact living history, share perspectives, influence public perceptions of events, and simultaneously fuse and conserve cultures in times of change. Showcasing numerous instruments, the presenters challenge participants to find new connections between song, art, and politics in American history.

November 17, 2016

Timekeeping and Timekeepers in Early New England

Join clock expert Bob Frishman for an illustrated talk of more than 100 digital images, offering the history of clocks and watches in New England beginning with the arrival of the Mayflower up to the adoption of standard time by the railroads in the late 19th century.

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